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Old 12-17-2010, 09:42 AM
 
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I'm trying get the general tenor and personality of these three areas and which would fit us best. My sense is that they're all very nice communities, but distinct and different.

We're looking for the best area for a new family. We like a more suburban, residential, family-friendly feel, but definitely not glitzy. While we actually like newer cookie-cutter suburbs, we hope to avoid those areas that are more hoity-toity (as some suburban communities certainly can be). We're also very outdoorsy, so a plethora of parkland and hiking opportunities is important. We also a prefer a more predominantly conservative area, though it doesn't have to be uniformly conservative.

Thanks.

Edit: Whoops--I mean Greensboro (although Greenville, SC is another community we're considering). Sorry.
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Old 12-17-2010, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Charlotte
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There isn't a huge difference between the three. Many people would say that Charlotte and Greensboro are more conservative than the Triangle. I'll talk about Charlotte and let others comment on the other areas.

We like a more suburban, residential, family-friendly feel, but definitely not glitzy.

While we actually like newer cookie-cutter suburbs, we hope to avoid those areas that are more hoity-toity (as some suburban communities certainly can be).


In general the Charlotte is a down to earth, suburban metro. There are a few areas that are more hoity-toity but they are easy to avoid.

We're also very outdoorsy, so a plethora of parkland and hiking opportunities is important.
  • Parks including several greenways and three nature preserves which have many hiking trails.

Less than an hour from Charlotte
  • Crowders Mountain (http://www.crowdersmountain.com/v1/default.asp - broken link) very popular for hiking, camping and climbing.

We also a prefer a more predominantly conservative area, though it doesn't have to be uniformly conservative.

As mentioned earlier, Charlotte is considered by many to be conservative city.
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Old 12-17-2010, 02:24 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
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Charlotte isn't conservative, it's moderate. Mecklenburg County is a blue county.
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Old 12-17-2010, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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Any urban area is going to be more politically progressive than more rural areas, but in NC, right outside the cities/suburbs, you can still find very rural areas (at least until the ever-encroaching sprawl catches them) that are more conservative politically. NC is an extremely "purple" state so you can find every viewpoint, though the area from Greensboro west is more Republican by a long shot (Asheville being the only "liberal spot" in Western NC).

What field of work are you in? The three areas have different focuses as far as finding jobs. Charlotte is closer to the mountains (though the Triad (Greensboro) is not far, and Raleigh is closest to the beach (since you mentioned outdoor recreation).

The "hoity-toity" areas near Raleigh would be more in Cary/Apex, or up near Wake Forest, such as Heritage and Wakefield. though not everywhere in those areas fits that bill. The most conservative part of the Triangle (Raleigh) is the Southern part near Garner. But i still think looking to see which area has better job prospects is a good first step, in this economy. Every one of the cities should have something like you're looking for.
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Old 12-17-2010, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Charlotte
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
Charlotte isn't conservative, it's moderate. Mecklenburg County is a blue county.
Didn't say it was, but it is perceived to be by many people. While I agree, "Moderate" is a relative term. I've lived in Charlotte for almost 15 years and I lean left and am quite liberal. So clearly I'm not saying everyone is conservative. I'm more talking about social norms and expectations not Democrat vs Republican. A common praise/criticism I've seen is that it is a conservative city.

For many potential relocators "Charlotte" isn't just the city itself. They are looking at the metro. If you look at all the counties, certainly most of the surrounding suburbs are more conservative.

Last edited by NCgirl; 12-17-2010 at 06:40 PM..
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Old 12-19-2010, 03:41 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCgirl View Post
Didn't say it was, but it is perceived to be by many people.
I was just making the point that perception isn't always reality. Politically, Mecklenburg County is blue. Socially, it also feels moderate. Socially conservative cities would include Greenville, SC and Jacksonville, FL and socially liberal cities include Atlanta, Austin, and DC. Charlotte falls squarely in the middle.

Quote:
For many potential relocators "Charlotte" isn't just the city itself. They are looking at the metro. If you look at all the counties, certainly most of the surrounding suburbs are more conservative.
That's the case for most metros. Charlotte is no different in that regard.
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Old 12-19-2010, 11:32 PM
 
4,675 posts, read 7,674,775 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoneNative View Post
I'm trying get the general tenor and personality of these three areas and which would fit us best. My sense is that they're all very nice communities, but distinct and different.

We're looking for the best area for a new family. We like a more suburban, residential, family-friendly feel, but definitely not glitzy. While we actually like newer cookie-cutter suburbs, we hope to avoid those areas that are more hoity-toity (as some suburban communities certainly can be). We're also very outdoorsy, so a plethora of parkland and hiking opportunities is important. We also a prefer a more predominantly conservative area, though it doesn't have to be uniformly conservative.

Thanks.

Edit: Whoops--I mean Greensboro (although Greenville, SC is another community we're considering). Sorry.
You really can't go wrong in either. Greensboro has the best location in this regard. You could hit up Raleigh or Charlotte for the weekend and still be in a smaller area. However, I can't really comment on the developments there because I know more of Charlotte and to a lesser extent Raleigh.

Charlotte has some great areas and some great greenways. University City is areal nice suburban community in Charlotte that has affordable housing, great parks, and some nice schools.
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Old 12-20-2010, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Charlotte
2,447 posts, read 6,429,388 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
I was just making the point that perception isn't always reality. Politically, Mecklenburg County is blue. Socially, it also feels moderate. Socially conservative cities would include Greenville, SC and Jacksonville, FL and socially liberal cities include Atlanta, Austin, and DC. Charlotte falls squarely in the middle.



That's the case for most metros. Charlotte is no different in that regard.
Since we can't "hear" on message boards this is in a sincere tone. I don't understand your need to argue. Some people here may like to debate topics, I do not. I just wanted to help the OP, GoneNative. I gave my opinion and then wanted to clarify. I respect your different perspective and hope you can do the same.

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Our opinions on a location or issue are just that, opinions. Highly subjective. Personal preferences. Quirks, even. Leave wiggle room for dialogue, others may not see things the same as you, or been there as long as you, and any one of us can be wrong. Pouncing on someone you disagree with runs contrary to the spirit of this board and its members. We are here to help each other.
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Old 12-21-2010, 09:52 AM
 
Location: metro ATL
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I'm not pouncing on you whatsoever, and I think you're being a bit sensitive here. You stated what you think others' perception is of Charlotte, and I stated what the reality is. I don't see what you're getting all up in arms about.
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