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Old 07-17-2007, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
3,895 posts, read 5,532,984 times
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Then there are the bizarre graves in The Old Burying Ground...here are a few of them...

--the grave of the little girl from Beaufort who died at sea on a trip back from England and her merchant captain father had promised her mother to bring her home no matter what, and so rather than the customary burial at sea, he preserved her little body in a keg of rum and thus it was buried in the Old Burying Ground...and local children, for the past 250 years, decorate her grave with toys and shells and the next morning they have been moved as though someone has taken them away to play with them...there are more tales and eye-witness accounts about this apparently haunted grave for you to discover.

--A British soldier fell ill in Beaufort during the Revolutionary War. With his dying words, he asked to be buried in full uniform, standing up, facing England, and saluting King George. So it was done, and he's still there, buried in that pose.

--Otway Burns, a highly-regarded privateer, lies buried with the cannon from his ship, The Snapdragon, atop his grave.

There are many more tales and fascinating graves to discover in this quaint and much-visited Old Burying Ground..you can pick up a self-guided walking brochure at the nearby Historical Site before entering the grounds.

Come back at night on a Ghost Tour for some more hair-raising adventures...
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Old 07-17-2007, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Quadrangle, NC
306 posts, read 900,420 times
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The Devil's Tramping Ground about ten miles south of Siler City. Devil's Tramping Ground.
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Old 07-26-2007, 07:15 AM
NCN
 
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Mineral Springs has a historical place called the Methodist Campground. All those little houses around the central meeting arbor are called "tents" because the Methodist all gathered together after the crops were in and had a religious camp for a couple of weeks. They still have this every year. I had never seen anything like this campground before.
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Old 07-26-2007, 07:38 AM
 
Location: Blue Ridge Mtns of NC
5,660 posts, read 18,368,130 times
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Does anyone remember the unclaimed corpse on display at a funeral home garage in Laurinburg? I personally saw him around 1969.

In 1911, a traveling carnival worker was killed in a fight. His body was taken to McDougald Funeral Home. His father traveled to Laurinburg, paid ten dollars down to have the body embalmed, and said he'd return with the rest of the money and burial instructions. And that was the last anyone at the funeral home ever heard from him. Just in case he came back, however, Mr. McDougald saved the body. For a while it hung from the wall in the embalming room. Later it was stored upright in a box in the garage. He became something of a tourist attraction, eventually being visited over the course of sixty years by thousands of people from all over the country.
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Old 07-26-2007, 12:49 PM
 
18 posts, read 89,331 times
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Taken from a CBS news story in 2000...

CBS) This week, CBS News Correspondent Steve Hartman has once again proven that everyone has a story. After reading this one, you may say to yourself, "There's no way he picked that story out of the phone book."

But he did.

Beacham McDougald is a funeral director by birth. It's what his father did, and his father did, and his father did.

"It was the last thing I wanted to do," says Beacham.

But the business was not the only thing he inherited. He also inherited Laurinburg's most famous legend.

"Everybody knew about Spaghetti," says one old timer.

"That's what they called him," recalls another.

"Uh huh, I guess he was an Italian," adds a third.

The legend of spaghetti started in 1911. Records show a traveling carnival worker was killed in a fight and brought to the McDougald Funeral Home on April 28 of that year. His real name was Concetto Farmica.

As the story goes, Concetto's father then worked out some sort of embalming payment plan with old Mr. McDougald. He put $10 down and promised to return later with the rest of the money and specific burial instructions.

"And nothing more was ever heard from him," says Beacham.

But just in case the family did ever return, Beacham's grandfather saved the body. About 30 years went by. Beacham's dad took over, and there went 30 more.

And that left the McDougalds with a bona fide mummy, which, for lack of a better place, they stored upright in the garage.

"There was the box right here," says Beachman pointing at a wall, "and it would open."

"Somebody would say, 'I dare you to go in,' and you'd go in," says one old timer.

"You'd just kind of duck in straight up in that box and duck out," recalls another.

"It would really scare you," adds a third.

Over the years, thousands of kids braved McDougald's garage and eventually word spread.

"It was all over the news," says an old timer.

Tourists started showing up. That lasted until 1972, when a congressman named Biaggi took exception to a fellow Italian becoming a public spectacle. So to bury the controversy, they buried Spaghetti 61 years after he had died.

"I believe they put about two tons of cement on him," says an old timer.

The McDougalds were worried someone might actually dig him up. Spaghetti had become that popular.

"He held quite a place of honor in our community," says one old timer.

"I think there was a great fondness there," says another.

"That was like a member of the family," adds a third.

And that's how a dead man made the best friends of his life. And gave a funeral director - the best story of his.

--------------------------------------------------

I live in Laurinburg and have always thought someone should open an Italian restaurant called 'Concetto's' or 'Farmica's'.

-S
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Old 07-26-2007, 01:53 PM
 
28 posts, read 107,407 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stacey1968 View Post
Taken from a CBS news story in 2000...

CBS) This week, CBS News Correspondent Steve Hartman has once again proven that everyone has a story. After reading this one, you may say to yourself, "There's no way he picked that story out of the phone book."

But he did.

Beacham McDougald is a funeral director by birth. It's what his father did, and his father did, and his father did.

"It was the last thing I wanted to do," says Beacham.

But the business was not the only thing he inherited. He also inherited Laurinburg's most famous legend.



-S

Yeah I work with some people who have gone to see him. I guess it was kind of a field trip arrangement. I was a little taken aback the first time I heard it.
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Old 08-16-2007, 02:07 PM
 
Location: The 12th State
22,080 posts, read 40,170,867 times
Reputation: 13305
YOu may have heard or seen the bureau at Furniture Land South but this beauty is off Wrenn St near the International Furniture Market buildings.



I was riding down highway 64 the best road in North Carolina to see beautiful country side thru out the state and came across a school that still has a school bell.



In Greensoboro off High Point Road you can see the wildlife below




Off Higway 150 you will meet this cute guy he right beside CJ Barbecue I love the murals on this building.


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Old 08-16-2007, 03:34 PM
 
1,900 posts, read 4,294,572 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnyKayak View Post

Winston Salem, North Carolina
there is a historical gas station shaped like a bright yellow Shell. This was a former Shell gas station.

Also located within this city is 12 foot tall by 16 feet circu****ence coffee pot.
Note that it is hyphenated Winston-Salem. Before they hyphen, there were two towns, Winston and Salem. Part of Salem has been preserved as "Old Salem" and that is where the (apparently obscene ) coffee pot is located. Old Salem is a pretty neat place to visit. Kind of a mini-Williamsburg. Lots of history with the Moravians. Other Moravian settlements are sprinkled around the area.

My Granddad actually grew up in a small house in Old Salem.
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Old 08-18-2007, 07:38 AM
 
Location: Concord, NC
1,418 posts, read 5,036,383 times
Reputation: 584
Mystery Hill - Between Boone and Blowing Rock.

South-of-the-Boarder - Just barely across the state line in Dillon, SC (south of Fayetteville off of I-95).
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Old 02-10-2009, 02:36 PM
 
1 posts, read 17,668 times
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Hey, just wanting to say that this info really helped, with a current report! Thanks!
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