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Old 02-08-2011, 06:15 PM
 
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I was wonderling if north carolina still had a southern accent or if it was changing. Also is north carolina accent more northern then alabama?
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Old 02-08-2011, 06:23 PM
 
Location: The 12th State
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Yes it just a different drawl than AL
Also it varies in thickness & drawl depending on which region you are in the state.
The mountains , foothills, piedmont, eastern & outer banks each has their own unique drawl.
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Old 02-08-2011, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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There really isn't "one" North Carolina accent, even among those born here. There is the "coastal" accent (similar tom Charleston SC), the Piedmont, and the "mountain" accent (think Dolly Parton). The cities on NC, like cities anywhere but especially here, have had a lot of influence from many, many Northerners moving into the area, though there are still plenty of Southern accents in any city.

NC's accents are probably less "traditionally Southern" than Alabama (though very rural areas of both states are probably similar), especially in the cities, but it is still a Southern state though one with a lot of Northerners.


This map
shows the general breakdown of accents in the US, and you can see that in a very general sense, NC's native accent is in the same area as Alabama's.

I little research will turn up many websites on the Southern American accent, such as this one. I encourage you to look for sites based on hard linguistic data, if it is an important issue to you.

(I have a degree in Linguistics and a lifelong interest in regional accents).
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Old 02-08-2011, 07:12 PM
 
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Given all the northerners moving here, I'd say it sounds roughly like a New Jersey accent!!
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Old 02-08-2011, 07:21 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
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North Carolina is a melting pot of accents.
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Old 02-08-2011, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowbelle View Post
Given all the northerners moving here, I'd say it sounds roughly like a New Jersey accent!!
There are many NJ accents here, unquestionably, but they are NOT "North Carolina accents", any more than, say, a Russian accent or an Arabic accent heard in NC is a "NC accent". [thank God!]

Quote:
North Carolina is a melting pot of accents.
Part "melting pot" (where different accents actually change each other) and part "salad bowl", where different dialects are retained but all coexist. Then there is the "hybrid" situation where one person's accent will actually shift to match the people s/he is talking to; that is very common in areas like this where people grow up around Southern, Northern, and other accents. My native accent is NC Southern but when I speak to non-Southerners, I switch to a more "neutral" accent without even realizing it, and that's common for folks who grew up here or other places where we grew up with teachers and classmates of all kinds of regional accents.
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Old 02-09-2011, 07:20 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowbelle View Post
Given all the northerners moving here, I'd say it sounds roughly like a New Jersey accent!!
(That was a joke) ;-)
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Old 02-09-2011, 08:16 AM
PDD
 
Location: The Sand Hills of NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowbelle View Post
Given all the northerners moving here, I'd say it sounds roughly like a New Jersey accent!!
NFN but no such thing as a Jersey accent.
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Old 02-09-2011, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Washington DC
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In the Southern Piedmont outside of Charlotte, people generally have standard American accents but word their sentences southern. I do it all the time. Not when I am typing nor writing. But when I talk.


"Them over there"

"I done did...."

"I ain't got it"

"when you gonna..."

"I done been ...."

"I done thought that...."

"I ain't never not .... "

etc.



Words generally said in a southern accent that's some-what noticeable;

Talk (Tawk)

Walk (wok)

Oil (Oh-woah) (I do NOT say that but a lot of people do.)

Wal*Mart (Woah - mart)




It reminds me of back in College. It was a community college with like 10 students so it was pretty intimate. My teacher asked "Erik, why are you not working" and I said "I done did it" and she said "You done did it?" and I said "Yeah." she repeated herself "You done did it?" and I said "yes...." and she repeated herself again until I finally realized she was correcting my English.... ha ha.

Last edited by Charlotte485; 02-09-2011 at 12:02 PM..
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Old 02-09-2011, 12:57 PM
 
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Interesting thread. As Francois says, there is no one NC southern accent, and in fact there are many different accents and local language quirks found across the state. For example:

--Coastal accents can be Charleston-like, or they can be VA tidewater-like (where r's are almost Boston-like, and "about" becomes "aboat").
--Native American communities have their own accents and idioms, like the Lumbees in the southeastern part of the state and Cherokees in the west.
--African-Americans have definitely left their mark on the language, and even among them there is tremendous variation depending on what part of NC you're from.
--Eastern coastal plains people have their own thing, like when they ask "What are you lookin'?" instead of the more familiar "What are you looking for?"

Of course, everything is melting together with the mass media and communication tools of today. It would be very interesting to hear what the language sounds like 100 years from now.
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