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Old 03-06-2017, 07:40 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
In colonial North America the middle colonies were Pennsylvania, NJ, & Maryland. When Delaware was spun off from Pennsylvania, it was included. The English colonies went as far south as a handful of parishes in Georgia, encompassing Augusta & Savannah.

In the mid 20th century the MidAtlantic was taught as being the transition from New England to the South. It was taught that it was comprised of Pennsylvania, NJ, Delaware, Maryland & Virginia, & that New York & North Carolina were sometimes included. North Carolina was taught as being the southern terminus of the the MidAtlantic AND the northern start of the South.
It wasn't taught like this everywhere, that's for sure. Probably not in most places as a matter of fact.
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Old 03-06-2017, 07:56 AM
 
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the triangle is mid atlantic, charlotte is the south, the coastal plains are part of the south

most of the piedmont is mid atlantic
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Old 03-06-2017, 08:10 AM
 
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Originally Posted by hey_guy View Post
the triangle is mid atlantic, charlotte is the south, the coastal plains are part of the south

most of the piedmont is mid atlantic
How so?
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Old 03-06-2017, 08:24 AM
 
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Originally Posted by mutiny77 View Post
how so?

i see it like this, blue is mid atlantic red is south
Is North Carolina mid-atlantic or southeast-capture.png
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Old 03-06-2017, 09:26 AM
 
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Originally Posted by hey_guy View Post
i see it like this, blue is mid atlantic red is south
Attachment 181673
You won't find one definition of the mid-Atlantic that includes parts of CT and MA; they are unquestionably New England. In common parlance, no part of NC is considered the mid-Atlantic and certainly not the Triad.

There's no rhyme or reason to your map whatsoever.
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Old 03-06-2017, 09:40 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
It wasn't taught like this everywhere, that's for sure. Probably not in most places as a matter of fact.
I'm a boomer. In conversation, with native boomers, they were taught the same, where I currently live. Many of them have family in the Delaware Valley & Baltimore regions & say that there are a lot of similarities & some differences, in their opinion & I agree with them.

It's hard to argue with North Carolina being the end of the MidAtlantic & the beginning of the South simultaneously, although some will argue it to the death.
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Old 03-06-2017, 09:45 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
I'm a boomer. In conversation, with native boomers, they were taught the same, where I currently live. Many of them have family in the Delaware Valley & Baltimore regions & say that there are a lot of similarities & some differences, in their opinion & I agree with them.

It's hard to argue with North Carolina being the end of the MidAtlantic & the beginning of the South simultaneously, although some will argue it to the death.
It's pretty easy to argue with it actually. From both a cultural and geographic standpoint, the south starts unquestionably well north of NC.

Historically, the mid-Atlantic is NJ, PA, and NY--the non-New England portion of the Northeast. From a contemporary standpoint, the mid-Atlantic centers on the DC/Baltimore region and extends into VA due to the DC 'burbs and sometimes Richmond and Hampton Roads are included. That's pretty much it.

What's the basis for including NC in the mid-Atlantic outside of a strict geographic definition (which has never really been the basis of the definition of the term)?
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Old 03-06-2017, 09:59 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
It's pretty easy to argue with it actually. From both a cultural and geographic standpoint, the south starts unquestionably well north of NC.

Historically, the mid-Atlantic is NJ, PA, and NY--the non-New England portion of the Northeast. From a contemporary standpoint, the mid-Atlantic centers on the DC/Baltimore region and extends into VA due to the DC 'burbs and sometimes Richmond and Hampton Roads are included. That's pretty much it.

What's the basis for including NC in the mid-Atlantic outside of a strict geographic definition (which has never really been the basis of the definition of the term)?
My opinion is the unquestionable Quaker influence, as well as some of the early migration patterns.
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Old 03-06-2017, 10:00 AM
 
Location: North of South, South of North
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
In colonial North America the middle colonies were Pennsylvania, NJ, & Maryland. When Delaware was spun off from Pennsylvania, it was included. The English colonies went as far south as a handful of parishes in Georgia, encompassing Augusta & Savannah.

In the mid 20th century the MidAtlantic was taught as being the transition from New England to the South. It was taught that it was comprised of Pennsylvania, NJ, Delaware, Maryland & Virginia, & that New York & North Carolina were sometimes included. North Carolina was taught as being the southern terminus of the the MidAtlantic AND the northern start of the South.
Well stated.
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Old 03-06-2017, 10:16 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
You won't find one definition of the mid-Atlantic that includes parts of CT and MA; they are unquestionably New England. In common parlance, no part of NC is considered the mid-Atlantic and certainly not the Triad.

There's no rhyme or reason to your map whatsoever.
ok well just draw the blue oval short wherever u feel new england starts it's totally besides my point
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