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Old 08-28-2006, 11:08 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymous View Post
If an enormous Category 5 made landfall in Charleston or Georgetown (completely destroying the SC coast) and made its way north to the Charlotte area (or Waxhaw), it would probably be a cat 1 or a cat 2 by that time.

This is information from the NOAA Nat'l Hurricane Center website:
Category One Hurricane:
Winds 74-95 mph (64-82 kt or 119-153 km/hr). Storm surge generally 4-5 ft above normal. No real damage to building structures. Damage primarily to unanchored mobile homes, shrubbery, and trees. Some damage to poorly constructed signs. Also, some coastal road flooding and minor pier damage.

Category Two Hurricane:
Winds 96-110 mph (83-95 kt or 154-177 km/hr). Storm surge generally 6-8 feet above normal. Some roofing material, door, and window damage of buildings. Considerable damage to shrubbery and trees with some trees blown down. Considerable damage to mobile homes, poorly constructed signs, and piers. Coastal and low-lying escape routes flood 2-4 hours before arrival of the hurricane center. Small craft in unprotected anchorages break moorings.

Category Three Hurricane:
Winds 111-130 mph (96-113 kt or 178-209 km/hr). Storm surge generally 9-12 ft above normal. Some structural damage to small residences and utility buildings with a minor amount of curtainwall failures. Damage to shrubbery and trees with foliage blown off trees and large trees blown down. Mobile homes and poorly constructed signs are destroyed. Low-lying escape routes are cut by rising water 3-5 hours before arrival of the center of the hurricane. Flooding near the coast destroys smaller structures with larger structures damaged by battering from floating debris. Terrain continuously lower than 5 ft above mean sea level may be flooded inland 8 miles (13 km) or more. Evacuation of low-lying residences with several blocks of the shoreline may be required.

Category Four Hurricane:
Winds 131-155 mph (114-135 kt or 210-249 km/hr). Storm surge generally 13-18 ft above normal. More extensive curtainwall failures with some complete roof structure failures on small residences. Shrubs, trees, and all signs are blown down. Complete destruction of mobile homes. Extensive damage to doors and windows. Low-lying escape routes may be cut by rising water 3-5 hours before arrival of the center of the hurricane. Major damage to lower floors of structures near the shore. Terrain lower than 10 ft above sea level may be flooded requiring massive evacuation of residential areas as far inland as 6 miles (10 km).

Category Five Hurricane:
Winds greater than 155 mph (135 kt or 249 km/hr). Storm surge generally greater than 18 ft above normal. Complete roof failure on many residences and industrial buildings. Some complete building failures with small utility buildings blown over or away. All shrubs, trees, and signs blown down. Complete destruction of mobile homes. Severe and extensive window and door damage. Low-lying escape routes are cut by rising water 3-5 hours before arrival of the center of the hurricane. Major damage to lower floors of all structures located less than 15 ft above sea level and within 500 yards of the shoreline. Massive evacuation of residential areas on low ground within 5-10 miles (8-16 km) of the shoreline may be required. Only 3 Category Five Hurricanes have made landfall in the United States since records began.
Was looking for that! Good job. Cat2 is still bad. I get 75mph winds here in the desert at times. Nothing new here. So Cat1 is ok. What about the airports. At what Cat do they stop all flights?
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Old 08-28-2006, 11:31 AM
 
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I'm not sure, but I would think that even a Cat 1 or a Tropical Storm would cancel flights. That's a guess, though.

The primary danger in a hurricane is storm surge - that 5-20 foot wall of water that comes in off the ocean. If you live within 10 miles of the coast, that would be a major concern. Secondary concerns would be trailers or mobile homes - these can be destroyed even in a smaller hurricane. Otherwise, you probably oughta be concerned about falling trees. We had a pecan tree fall on our house in 1989 during Hurricane Hugo, which was a strong 3 or weak 4 by the time it hit my hometown. Falling trees caused the power to go out, and our water was cut off.

It's good to own a chainsaw, and know how to use it. I can remember the day after Hugo, the entire town was out chopping up firewood.
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Old 08-28-2006, 01:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymous View Post
I'm not sure, but I would think that even a Cat 1 or a Tropical Storm would cancel flights. That's a guess, though.

The primary danger in a hurricane is storm surge - that 5-20 foot wall of water that comes in off the ocean. If you live within 10 miles of the coast, that would be a major concern. Secondary concerns would be trailers or mobile homes - these can be destroyed even in a smaller hurricane. Otherwise, you probably oughta be concerned about falling trees. We had a pecan tree fall on our house in 1989 during Hurricane Hugo, which was a strong 3 or weak 4 by the time it hit my hometown. Falling trees caused the power to go out, and our water was cut off.

It's good to own a chainsaw, and know how to use it. I can remember the day after Hugo, the entire town was out chopping up firewood.
Cat3 or a 4 would get flooding too right? How long without power/water did you have?
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Old 08-28-2006, 01:31 PM
 
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From what I read the track has many possibilities now -

The national hurrican center is predicting it move move toward the carolina coast at 80 mph -

if this happens, it would cause heavy rain and strong winds from southern Georgia to the Outer Banks

There are other tracts in can take, but the only thing forecasted for the charlotte area depsite the tracts would be a variable on heavy rains and winds...The amount and strenght really depends on the tract it takes - different computer models have having different forecasts -

Again to all those in that region, keep watching your news, this storm changed yesterday - and it appears it will continue to do so, be prepared and again safety to all in this area
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Old 08-28-2006, 01:37 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weis02 View Post
From what I read the track has many possibilities now -

The national hurrican center is predicting it move move toward the carolina coast at 80 mph -

if this happens, it would cause heavy rain and strong winds from southern Georgia to the Outer Banks

There are other tracts in can take, but the only thing forecasted for the charlotte area depsite the tracts would be a variable on heavy rains and winds...The amount and strenght really depends on the tract it takes - different computer models have having different forecasts -

Again to all those in that region, keep watching your news, this storm changed yesterday - and it appears it will continue to do so, be prepared and again safety to all in this area
So flooding isn't an issue in the Fort Mill and Charlotte area?
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Old 08-28-2006, 01:50 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TornadoAlley View Post
So flooding isn't an issue in the Fort Mill and Charlotte area?
I do not know, the wost case scenario I saw due to the different tracts is if the system stalls over the carolinas that would be heavy rain and could mean flooding in some areas...

I don't even think the professionals know what is going to happen -

If I see anything specifc to these areas I will post
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Old 08-28-2006, 02:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weis02 View Post
I do not know, the wost case scenario I saw due to the different tracts is if the system stalls over the carolinas that would be heavy rain and could mean flooding in some areas...

I don't even think the professionals know what is going to happen -

If I see anything specifc to these areas I will post
Maybe I should have asked different. My fault. Are those areas acceptable to flooding in general?
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Old 08-28-2006, 02:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TornadoAlley View Post
Maybe I should have asked different. My fault. Are those areas acceptable to flooding in general?


A few weeks back, I dont' remember when (I am sure someone will) there was some heavy rains and flooding in areas around charlotte, many lost power, etc ...

One thing I have learned about mother nature is never say never.

There are areas that never get hit with things and then one day boom, here on LI, we had a bad storm last week and they note a tornado hit down

when we look at past weather and statisitics for an area just because something happened or didn't doesn't mean it can't or won't, the bottom line, Be Prepared - play it safe -
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Old 08-28-2006, 02:24 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymous View Post
It's good to own a chainsaw, and know how to use it. I can remember the day after Hugo, the entire town was out chopping up firewood.
It's good to own one period. Ice storms fell trees as well. One we had in .... 2004 IIRC, that brought down pine trees and totally blocked our road. While people in other parts of the state were whining because "nobody" was coming to rescue them, the people in our neighborhood had a tree cutting party. With the exception of one homeowner (who got a stink eye because he just stood and watched, didn't even offer to help pull limbs out of the way ) we all have chain saws. Much buzzing was heard that day

Bethany looks to be the most affected poster on this board by Ernesto - which has been downgraded to a Tropical Storm. Looking at the NOAA page, he's swinging farther east *whew*. One benefit will be the rain, as long as it isn't a deluge. We desperately need that.
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Old 08-28-2006, 02:54 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weis02 View Post
A few weeks back, I dont' remember when (I am sure someone will) there was some heavy rains and flooding in areas around charlotte, many lost power, etc ...
Raleigh. Alberto. http://photo.accuweather.com/accupic/showphoto.php?photo=8754&cat=520&page=1 (broken link)

One thing to consider is that much of the flooding can be blamed on poor development. Charlotte has seen an increase in flooding simply because everything is being paved over Developers are also wanting to build in areas where there was once natural runoff, leading to events of people being washed out of their neighborhoods. Much of the high water, and damage caused by flooding, is really our own d* fault
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