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Old 06-23-2015, 12:25 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
21,869 posts, read 27,133,212 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
No disrespect but why do you keep lumping NC in with the Mid-Atlantic? We're probably more similar to Mississippi over Pennsylvania or New Jersey, really (maybe even Maryland, too). We're comfortably in the South, things start to get iffy north of Richmond.
Was there something inaccurate in my post?

I was taught that NC is both MidAtlantic & the South. I know quite a few North Carolina natives who are in my age group who were taught the same. Someone else brought up the MidAtlantic. I pointed out some things. Were any of the things that I pointed out historically inaccurate?

During the Civil War there was a group in North Carolina who were actively devoted to overthrowing the Confederacy. At the beginning of the war the NJ legislature debated joining the Confederacy. In mid-war they passed an attempt to recognize the Confederacy & withdraw from the war.

Jim Crow was the law in most of the MidAtlantic until federal laws prohibited it. Same with NC. Think about it. In the 1960s which states were more like North Carolina? Delaware, Maryland, South Carolina, Mississippi? When I was in high school, the feds came in & ordered my county to bus students. They were adamant until they found out that the individual towns were districts. That's the only reason that I escaped being bussed to Camden.

You have a lot of threads trying to tie NC to the deep South. I don't question you about that. Does it make you uncomfortable that I've pointed out similarities to the MidAtlantic? Was there something inaccurate about me pointing out that Falwell's contemporaries included Jim & Tammy Fay & Carl McIntyre? I did point out that McIntyre was connected to the Presbyterian church.
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Old 06-23-2015, 07:47 AM
 
3,099 posts, read 4,123,528 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
No disrespect but why do you keep lumping NC in with the Mid-Atlantic? We're probably more similar to Mississippi over Pennsylvania or New Jersey, really (maybe even Maryland, too). We're comfortably in the South, things start to get iffy north of Richmond.
Because some people put it in the Mid-Atlantic. Obviously, it is also in the South too, just like Virginia, but an increasing number of people and media also include it in the Mid Atlantic. It has been debated here and elsewhere ad nauseum, and I am sure someone will revive those threads soon. Just because some people don't think it is part of the MA does not mean that others will stop thinking it is or should not refer to it as such.

Last edited by Tarheelhombre; 06-23-2015 at 08:59 AM..
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Old 06-23-2015, 08:14 AM
 
29,710 posts, read 27,133,604 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
No disrespect but why do you keep lumping NC in with the Mid-Atlantic? We're probably more similar to Mississippi over Pennsylvania or New Jersey, really (maybe even Maryland, too). We're comfortably in the South, things start to get iffy north of Richmond.
NC has a few mid-Atlantic influences and from a strictly geographical perspective it might be included, but historically and culturally it is unquestionably Southern. Virginia is the only state to which both the Southern and mid-Atlantic labels apply more or less equally.
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Old 06-23-2015, 08:45 AM
 
269 posts, read 347,114 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
NC has a few mid-Atlantic influences and from a strictly geographical perspective it might be included, but historically and culturally it is unquestionably Southern. Virginia is the only state to which both the Southern and mid-Atlantic labels apply more or less equally.
I pretty much agree, but I feel that west of the I95 corridor VA is very much a southern state.
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Old 06-23-2015, 09:07 AM
 
2,825 posts, read 3,243,500 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BullGoodBearBad View Post
I pretty much agree, but I feel that west of the I95 corridor VA is very much a southern state.
More like south of I-64, but I agree Virginia leans more towards the South than Mid-Atlantic. Virginia is arguably more similar to North Carolina over Maryland.

Last edited by JayJayCB; 06-23-2015 at 09:36 AM..
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Old 06-23-2015, 09:12 AM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,823,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southernlady5464 View Post
North Carolina...a valley of humility between two mountains of conceit.

That's what I was taught in grade school in SC. Liz
That's the traditional saying coming from the fact that N. C. had fewer larger farms and plantations and had more small farms and less affluent residents. Our coastline gave us no major ports to ship our goods, etc. Our motto is "To be rather than to seem." That means we are real people that can be trusted. What you see is what you get.

The Tar Heel means that we stick like tar and can be depended on in a crisis. We will let you think you have the advantage of us but if you think that, you better watch out. Your time will come and you will know it. And that sports announcer that calls our team the "Heels" has no understanding of who we are. There is a lot of difference between a Tar Heel and a heel.

I think the proper answer to the question is that we are like North Carolina. And Virginia and South Carolina are alike in ego.

Last edited by NCN; 06-23-2015 at 09:21 AM..
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Old 06-23-2015, 09:29 AM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,823,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
Was there something inaccurate in my post?

I was taught that NC is both MidAtlantic & the South. I know quite a few North Carolina natives who are in my age group who were taught the same. Someone else brought up the MidAtlantic. I pointed out some things. Were any of the things that I pointed out historically inaccurate?

During the Civil War there was a group in North Carolina who were actively devoted to overthrowing the Confederacy. At the beginning of the war the NJ legislature debated joining the Confederacy. In mid-war they passed an attempt to recognize the Confederacy & withdraw from the war.

Jim Crow was the law in most of the MidAtlantic until federal laws prohibited it. Same with NC. Think about it. In the 1960s which states were more like North Carolina? Delaware, Maryland, South Carolina, Mississippi? When I was in high school, the feds came in & ordered my county to bus students. They were adamant until they found out that the individual towns were districts. That's the only reason that I escaped being bussed to Camden.

You have a lot of threads trying to tie NC to the deep South. I don't question you about that. Does it make you uncomfortable that I've pointed out similarities to the MidAtlantic? Was there something inaccurate about me pointing out that Falwell's contemporaries included Jim & Tammy Fay & Carl McIntyre? I did point out that McIntyre was connected to the Presbyterian church.
The weather forecast always mentions us in the Mid-Atlantic. Imagine my shock when we moved to Colorado for my husband to go to school and my landlady informed me that she considers North Carolina the Deep South. If I remember correctly we were next to last of the Southern states to leave the union and close to the last to rejoin. That may not be accurate but I don't have the time to verify it right now. The reason the Civil War was State's Rights to us was that we had very few slave owners and they did not own that many.

As for school busing, I lived in Charlotte at the time and they were first to have it forced on them. Still haven't recovered.
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Old 06-23-2015, 09:49 AM
 
3,099 posts, read 4,123,528 times
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You could argue that self-identity is not the best way to measure liberalism or conservatism of an area, but it is one measure. According to Gallup, North Carolina is the 20th most conservative state in self-identity *(tied with Iowa), the 23rd most liberal state in self-identity (tied with Wisconsin). South Carolina is the 10th most conservative state in self-identity, the 39th most liberal state. Virginia is the 28th most conservative state in self-identity, the 26th most liberal state. This might explain why Democrats and progressives are much more successful and visible in North Carolina than other southern states, except Virginia. There is much larger pool of liberal-identified residents in NC than other Southern states.

http://www.gallup.com/poll/181505/mi...ve-states.aspx
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Old 06-23-2015, 10:08 AM
 
29,710 posts, read 27,133,604 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
The weather forecast always mentions us in the Mid-Atlantic. Imagine my shock when we moved to Colorado for my husband to go to school and my landlady informed me that she considers North Carolina the Deep South. If I remember correctly we were next to last of the Southern states to leave the union and close to the last to rejoin. That may not be accurate but I don't have the time to verify it right now. The reason the Civil War was State's Rights to us was that we had very few slave owners and they did not own that many.

As for school busing, I lived in Charlotte at the time and they were first to have it forced on them. Still haven't recovered.
Other than geography, was that especially shocking to you, and if so why?
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Old 06-23-2015, 11:54 AM
 
3,099 posts, read 4,123,528 times
Reputation: 2544
In 2010, North Carolina's population was 66% urban, as defined by the US Census. Virginia's population was 76% urban, South's Carolina's population 66%. Maryland's population was 87% urban. However, the Census' definition of urban is broader than what many of us what define urban. The Census Bureau identifies two types of urban areas:

Urbanized Areas (UAs) of 50,000 or more people;
Urban Clusters (UCs) of at least 2,500 and less than 50,000 people.

“Rural” encompasses all population, housing, and territory not included within an urban area.
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