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Old 06-30-2009, 02:07 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmd69 View Post
Nothing is like SC.
Actually a lot is.
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Old 06-30-2009, 03:07 PM
 
6,272 posts, read 10,018,545 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
And NC had Jesse Helms while SC had Strom Thurmond.
Yeah, but Strom Thurmond's oldest child is black. Point goes to SC for hypocrisy.



Her name is Essie Mae Washington-Williams. I can certainly see a resemblance.
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Old 06-30-2009, 07:03 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancharlotte View Post
Yeah, but Strom Thurmond's oldest child is black. Point goes to SC for hypocrisy.
Wait until Jesse's half-Black love child finally works up the nerve to come forward.
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Old 07-01-2009, 02:46 PM
 
Location: central North Carolina
62 posts, read 150,321 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rubber_factory View Post
I agree with most of what you say, but I'm not sure that this is the case. I know SC had relatively large numbers of Scots-Irish, French protestant, German, Swiss, and Dutch immigrants prior to the Civil War.
Really? I knew SC had lots of French Protestants (French Heugenots) who, along with the English, settled the lowcountry/Charleston area of SC. And I knew the upstate was largely settled by the Scots-Irish. But most of SC was settled by the English. Never read or heard about German, Swiss and Dutch settlement in SC. I HAVE read about the German, Swiss and Dutch settlement in NC though...
You may be thinking of NC...
I know for a fact that New Bern, NC was settled by the Swiss and Dutch before colonial times. Winston-Salem (especially Old Salem) and parts of the western Peidmont and foothills had lots of German Moravian settlement. Those Moravians came down fom PA in the mid 1700's to settle in NC.
The Cape Fear Valley/Fayetteville area of NC was settled by the highland Scots during the same time. Western NC was largely settled by the Scots-Irish and Germans .......like most of Appalachia. Eastern NC was largely settled by the English and some Welsh (except New Bern) and the central Piedmont was settled by English, Scots-Irish and Germans.

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Old 07-01-2009, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Roanoke VA
2,031 posts, read 6,138,041 times
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When a person visits North or South Carolina everything is mentioned as "Carolina" this or that. I always thought growing up as a visitor to the Carolinas that everyone identified as Carolinians and not North or South Carolina. I only learned until recently that NC and SC really had their distinct differences. Whenever I visit NC there is a identity as a "Southern" city, not an "American" city. I don't think being "Southern" really goes over as well in VA. I think we think of ourselves more as the birthplace of America, even though we have many of the "Southern" values of NC & SC. To me, NoVa is DC, I could never understand why people in that part of VA want to seperate themselves from DC. Is it a segregation thing? To me, DC is one of the most beautiful cities in the world. Enjoy!
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Old 07-01-2009, 09:41 PM
 
Location: central North Carolina
62 posts, read 150,321 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roanoker 4 View Post
When a person visits North or South Carolina everything is mentioned as "Carolina" this or that. I always thought growing up as a visitor to the Carolinas that everyone identified as Carolinians and not North or South Carolina. I only learned until recently that NC and SC really had their distinct differences. Whenever I visit NC there is a identity as a "Southern" city, not an "American" city. I don't think being "Southern" really goes over as well in VA. I think we think of ourselves more as the birthplace of America, even though we have many of the "Southern" values of NC & SC. To me, NoVa is DC, I could never understand why people in that part of VA want to seperate themselves from DC. Is it a segregation thing? To me, DC is one of the most beautiful cities in the world. Enjoy!
You really need to read up on some American history...

The definition of "Southern" as well as most other things evolves over time...
Virginia was the birthplace of America AND the American South. The old definition of "southern" was of the old antebellum South, especially the coastal South. States like Virginia and South Carolina were the epitome of the Old South. But today, Virginia is increasingly being 'pulled in' with the MidAtlantic states because of DC. The 'New South' is more of the Peidmont culture, which is really a blend of Appalachian and Coastal Plains culture.
Many people think of old Confederate cities like Richmond and Charleston as less 'southern' today than say Winston-Salem or Chattanooga despite Richmond and Charleston having a MORE southern history (demographics, economy, slavery, Civil War history, etc.).
Like I said before, states change over time. Kentucky is every bit as southern, maybe even moreso than Virginia, despite having a much less southern history than Virginia.
I would say Virginia is a mixed New South/MidAtlantic state nowadays.
North Carolina is a decidedly New South state today.
South Carolina is a mixed Old South/New South state. Basically the South Atlantic states plus maybe Tennessee are the 'New South' states. I think of Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama as more 'Old South'.
Of course, the Atlantic southern states are some of the oldest states in the country, so they definitley have the Old South history. But when I mean 'Old South' in today's form, I am talking about the economy and culture of what many consider Old South.

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Old 07-02-2009, 11:30 PM
 
Location: Roanoke VA
2,031 posts, read 6,138,041 times
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Yes, states do change over time. Today in VA over 32% of the states population reside in Northern VA(only 33% were born in VA).
These people are largely foreign born, have some of the highest incomes and education in the nation. There is a cultural and economic divide that has developed in the state between the regions. Because of the increasing dominance of Northern VA this state has lost much of its "southerness".
I have noticed the "southern" accent line starts to disappear around Charlottesville and a bit north of Richmond. From what I've noticed here a discussion of "old South/new South" would not generate much interest. I have read many readers in NC especially feel their culture has been changed by so many transplants with little regard of southerners' history. Yes, VA NC & SC are indeed changing very fast!
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Old 07-06-2009, 11:03 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,790,027 times
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I don't think NC is more like one over the other.
That said, here are some random thoughts on the issue.
  • Politically, NC is more like VA. SC, as a whole, is much more politically conservative than either NC or VA.
  • All 3 states have a distinct Coastal Plain, Piedmont and Mountain area.
  • NC's geographic areas are more distinct and dramatic than either VA or SC
  • NC is the most populated of the three and the fastest growing.
  • There are parts of NC and VA (especially NOVA) that feel decidely less Southern than other areas in their respective states. I don't get that sense in SC.
  • Virginia feels more blue blood culturally than either NC or SC.
  • SC definitely feels more Southern overall than the other two states.
  • NC and VA have much larger cities than SC. SC has a fairly large metro area in Greenville/Spartanburg but it's spread out and none of the cities are very large.
  • Agriculturally, I think SC and NC have more in common with each other than either of them would have with VA.
  • Richmond feels like Winston Salem
  • Charlottesville feels like a cross between Chapel Hill and Asheville
  • NOVA feels like parts of The Triangle (Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill)
  • Eastern NC feels more like Eastern SC than Eastern VA.
  • Western NC feels more like Western VA than Western SC
  • NC's population is more evenly distributed across the state in more metro areas than in either SC or VA
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Old 07-07-2009, 01:01 AM
 
Location: east of my daughter-north of my son
1,928 posts, read 3,197,694 times
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This is a great thread! History and geography lessons. Things I never knew. Thanks!!!!
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Old 07-07-2009, 05:44 AM
 
Location: Apex, NC
3,036 posts, read 7,397,847 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
I don't think NC is more like one over the other.
That said, here are some random thoughts on the issue.
  • Politically, NC is more like VA. SC, as a whole, is much more politically conservative than either NC or VA.
  • All 3 states have a distinct Coastal Plain, Piedmont and Mountain area.
  • NC's geographic areas are more distinct and dramatic than either VA or SC
  • NC is the most populated of the three and the fastest growing.
  • There are parts of NC and VA (especially NOVA) that feel decidely less Southern than other areas in their respective states. I don't get that sense in SC.
  • Virginia feels more blue blood culturally than either NC or SC.
  • SC definitely feels more Southern overall than the other two states.
  • NC and VA have much larger cities than SC. SC has a fairly large metro area in Greenville/Spartanburg but it's spread out and none of the cities are very large.
  • Agriculturally, I think SC and NC have more in common with each other than either of them would have with VA.
  • Richmond feels like Winston Salem
  • Charlottesville feels like a cross between Chapel Hill and Asheville
  • NOVA feels like parts of The Triangle (Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill)
  • Eastern NC feels more like Eastern SC than Eastern VA.
  • Western NC feels more like Western VA than Western SC
  • NC's population is more evenly distributed across the state in more metro areas than in either SC or VA
I would pretty much agree with you on all points.
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