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Old 05-30-2012, 01:33 PM
 
222 posts, read 457,363 times
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It seems that each day there are new threads about people relocating to North Carolina. I do not understand why. I am a transplant myself so I am not simply posting a rant from a native who is upset with the transplants. I am just honestly confused as to why so many are coming this way with hopes that the streets are made out of gold.

It would be understandable if these prospective transplants were being transferred down here or had jobs lined up, but most don't. Most seem to suggest that they are planning to move to North Carolina and then look for a job, despite economic numbers that suggest that jobs are not more plentiful down here than anywhere else. Further, many of these prospective transplants seem to be from sophisticated and cosmopolitan areas and seem to expect cities like Raleigh, Charlotte, Greensboro, etc, to be culturally similar to Seattle, Boston, and NYC, even though common sense should tell people that this won't be so. So why all the confusion? Do people just look at the cost of living and assume that because it's low, North Carolina must be a paradise, with jobs growing on trees, etc?
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Old 05-30-2012, 06:21 PM
 
Location: NC
1,981 posts, read 2,641,126 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DMG721 View Post
It seems that each day there are new threads about people relocating to North Carolina. I do not understand why. I am a transplant myself so I am not simply posting a rant from a native who is upset with the transplants. I am just honestly confused as to why so many are coming this way with hopes that the streets are made out of gold.

It would be understandable if these prospective transplants were being transferred down here or had jobs lined up, but most don't. Most seem to suggest that they are planning to move to North Carolina and then look for a job, despite economic numbers that suggest that jobs are not more plentiful down here than anywhere else. Further, many of these prospective transplants seem to be from sophisticated and cosmopolitan areas and seem to expect cities like Raleigh, Charlotte, Greensboro, etc, to be culturally similar to Seattle, Boston, and NYC, even though common sense should tell people that this won't be so. So why all the confusion? Do people just look at the cost of living and assume that because it's low, North Carolina must be a paradise, with jobs growing on trees, etc?
IMO it's partially due to all of the "Best Place" to live/retire/have a business list. It's also due to the lower overall cost of living and higher quality of life. For example, a 500-700k home in Cary will be brand new, custom-built PLUS be in an excellent school district.


Cary is also one of the lowest taxed parts of NC. The reason why I mention Cary is because most residents are transplants. It is a very safe area with many green spaces including trails, sidewalks, etc. Truely a great place to raise a family.


Prospective transplants need to do their homework and should have a job lined up before moving to NC. The unemployment rate is high. There is alot of competition here as well.

You stated that your a transplant yourself so what were your reasons for moving here?
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Old 05-30-2012, 06:34 PM
 
222 posts, read 457,363 times
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Originally Posted by escapenc View Post
You stated that your a transplant yourself so what were your reasons for moving here?
My line of work brought me down here, so I only moved here because of my job essentially. I totally get why people do that. Just curious why people are moving here without jobs. I've even seen threads where people have jobs in other places and are considering leaving them and looking for jobs here!

Though since I am now underemployed in my line of work I am on the lookout for full-time employment elsewhere and may be relocating somewhere else in the near future. So like I said I am all in favor of being mobile and going where life takes you, but I feel like a lot of people are moving here for the wrong reasons, or moving here without a plan and thinking that everything will work out just because they read an article about North Carolina being a hotspot for transplants
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Old 05-30-2012, 06:51 PM
 
Location: NC
1,981 posts, read 2,641,126 times
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Originally Posted by DMG721 View Post
My line of work brought me down here, so I only moved here because of my job essentially. I totally get why people do that. Just curious why people are moving here without jobs.
I've never understood why anyone would relocate without a job lined up. Like I said, competition is fierce. I have cousins who moved out of NC for work, would love to move back, but can't because there isn't any employment!
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Old 05-30-2012, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Carrboro and Concord, NC
964 posts, read 2,040,820 times
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I think NC is becoming known as a place with a high, but steady rate of growth, without that growth becoming a real estate bubble, like parts of Florida or the Southwest. So IMO that is part of it.

It's no utopia for sure - the tradition of generally moderate politics seems to be on the ropes for the time being, but this too is simply a reflection in microcosm of how polarized the entire nation is. and unemployment is stubbornly high, in comparison with other states. Our infrastructure is certainly showing its' age. University costs are low in comparison with other states (a big draw, once you've been here long enough to claim residency), but they are climbing at ever-escalating rates: there is something of an intellectual arms race at star universities to attract talent, and while that can pay off in business spin-offs and entreprenurial alumni, the costs do hit massive, and growing numbers of students hard. The quality of public schools around the state veers wildly from award-winning to awful, so this too depends on location, and is thus inherently unequal, and politics has been heavily polluting school governance, especially over the last 2 decades.

But the state is dynamic, and while it's not as cosmopolitan as Chicago, NYC, Boston, SF or Seattle, it's much more diverse than it was when I was a teenager (1980s), por ejemplo. And NC does boast both one of the largest stretch of undeveloped (mostly) coastline (Cape Hatteras and Cape lookout National Seashores - part of the National Park system), and the tallest stretch of the Appalachian Mountains - of the 50+ peaks east of the Mississippi River that rise beyond 6000 feet in elevation, all but two are partially or entirely in NC, and many of those are in either National Park or Wilderness areas. East of the Rocky Mountain Front, only Texas beats us in absolute elevation range - sea level to 6700 feet; Boone is the highest town with a population of greater than 10,000 east of the Miss, and Beech Mountain (just shy of 6000 feet) is the highest incorporated town east of the Black Hills of South Dakota. So both socially and in terms of nature, the state has a lot to offer.
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Old 05-31-2012, 06:58 AM
 
Location: Englewood, CO
361 posts, read 492,221 times
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Originally Posted by escapenc View Post
I've never understood why anyone would relocate without a job lined up. Like I said, competition is fierce. I have cousins who moved out of NC for work, would love to move back, but can't because there isn't any employment!
I can answer this, but of course only for myself. I moved to NC for family reasons. And yes, I moved without a job. But the need to be close to the family I had here was far more important than any job (my ex had moved to NC with my child).

Now, I did substantial research before moving, and found that in my fairly small, specialized field, I'd probably have little problem finding work. I visited 3 times, different parts of the state, arranging meetings during each of the visits with people that understood the type of work I do so I could find out more about how to best position myself. From that, I determined the bests location for my work (Raleigh), and then started researching living expenses, starting with housing, including insurance (health and car), and reading weekly sales ads for food and clothing both so I could see what the general cost of these items were. I did not make the move until I had saved enough for 6 months of expenses. Then, I finally got to be closer to my wonderful child.

I found a full time job in my field within 3 months, and at 6 months here, met a wonderful local fella (born at Rex Hospital, graduated Apex HS, went to UNC-W, NC State, and finally graduated from Appalachian). Today is our fourth anniversary, and 3 years ago, my ex asked if I wanted full custody of my daughter, because he was leaving NC. I couldn't ask for anything better than my life right now. So, yeah, sometimes people move without work lined up. And sometimes it works out, but not without a whole lot of effort!
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Old 05-31-2012, 08:50 AM
 
Location: On the brink of WWIII
21,094 posts, read 23,822,000 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DMG721 View Post
It seems that each day there are new threads about people relocating to North Carolina. I do not understand why. I am a transplant myself so I am not simply posting a rant from a native who is upset with the transplants. I am just honestly confused as to why so many are coming this way with hopes that the streets are made out of gold.

It would be understandable if these prospective transplants were being transferred down here or had jobs lined up, but most don't. Most seem to suggest that they are planning to move to North Carolina and then look for a job, despite economic numbers that suggest that jobs are not more plentiful down here than anywhere else. Further, many of these prospective transplants seem to be from sophisticated and cosmopolitan areas and seem to expect cities like Raleigh, Charlotte, Greensboro, etc, to be culturally similar to Seattle, Boston, and NYC, even though common sense should tell people that this won't be so. So why all the confusion? Do people just look at the cost of living and assume that because it's low, North Carolina must be a paradise, with jobs growing on trees, etc?
I think many folks are still reading articles that say it is growing, top 10 on some list and better than average prospects.
On the other hand, I know 3-4 folks who are leaving for various reasons. Though more typically it is the lower pay that is the reason. The 3-4 I know are heading back to Michigan where there has been some stability in the job market.
As much as I love NC, I will also be returning primarily due to the low pay and a freeze on teacher salary the last 4 years. At least I will be trading in the beauty of NC for a 50% raise. Of the other 3-4, two are also teachers who left for the same reason.
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Old 05-31-2012, 10:55 AM
 
6,270 posts, read 9,995,686 times
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Originally Posted by DMG721 View Post
Further, many of these prospective transplants seem to be from sophisticated and cosmopolitan areas and seem to expect cities like Raleigh, Charlotte, Greensboro, etc, to be culturally similar to Seattle, Boston, and NYC, even though common sense should tell people that this won't be so. So why all the confusion? Do people just look at the cost of living and assume that because it's low, North Carolina must be a paradise, with jobs growing on trees, etc?
If there was "confusion", NC would never retain the vast majority of these "sophisticated and cosmopolitan" people. From what I've seen, it's the least educated burger flipping transplants who "wants to go back home". Most of the doctors, lawyers, bankers, nurses and such who relocate here wouldn't dream of going back "home".
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Old 05-31-2012, 09:16 PM
 
1 posts, read 10,362 times
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My Husband and I are moving from Boston to Western NC in less than a month. I am a nurse and really had no problem lining a job up. For us, its about quality of life. I am taking a significant paycut to move from Boston, but having made more than 10 trips to the area before making the decision to move- We felt that it was well worth taking a chance. We also have friend in the town we are moving to, so I am sure that helps. I know for us, quality of life was a major factor!
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Old 06-05-2012, 11:59 AM
 
2,820 posts, read 4,914,954 times
Reputation: 2535
Default Post of the day!!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by DMG721 View Post
It seems that each day there are new threads about people relocating to North Carolina. I do not understand why. I am a transplant myself so I am not simply posting a rant from a native who is upset with the transplants. I am just honestly confused as to why so many are coming this way with hopes that the streets are made out of gold.

It would be understandable if these prospective transplants were being transferred down here or had jobs lined up, but most don't. Most seem to suggest that they are planning to move to North Carolina and then look for a job, despite economic numbers that suggest that jobs are not more plentiful down here than anywhere else. Further, many of these prospective transplants seem to be from sophisticated and cosmopolitan areas and seem to expect cities like Raleigh, Charlotte, Greensboro, etc, to be culturally similar to Seattle, Boston, and NYC, even though common sense should tell people that this won't be so. So why all the confusion? Do people just look at the cost of living and assume that because it's low, North Carolina must be a paradise, with jobs growing on trees, etc?
I been saying this all alone....People move here from sophisticated/cosmopolitan areas and they think that Charlotte will be the same. Most are highly disappointed, especially the ones that move from California. I had a coworker move here from San Diego and ask where the sidewalk cafe's were/eclectic neighborhood shops/all night coffee houses/etc. I had to break it to her to say the least.....LOL. She is no longer in Charlotte. She ended up moving back to California. In her own words, she felt like she was in a cultural vacuum.
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