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Old 10-02-2006, 10:51 AM
Status: "Life is a hard teacher gives the test 1st" (set 28 days ago)
 
Location: Charlotte,NC, US, North America, Earth, Alpha Quadrant,Milky Way Galaxy
3,375 posts, read 4,698,210 times
Reputation: 1705

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Liz Ann View Post
What many people don't realilze is this: Less [money] is not more. If you make "six figures" in the northeast, or even north of the Mason Dixon line, there is no way you will make that in the south. Maybe HALF of that. Less is not more in your 401K, IRA, cost of living, relocation costs back and forth if you don't like it. Not to mention what you could do to your children tearing them away from their security and friends. What are you going to do, follow the crowd around the country like sheep looking for the cheapest place to live? Take a lesson from the Floridians ... who are trying to bail out. Folks need to give this whole relocation thing enough rationalization. It was different when large corporations would transfer folks, it was your job, you had to go and 99% made out very well with transfer bonuses and so forth. That is not the case anymore, many companies do not relo people. It costs a company between $50,000 and $75,000 to relocate one individual because they pick up many of the costs. If you do not have a steady job and a future with a company in the south, do not even consider it. Low cost of living means low pay. That's pretty much the rule, not the exception. If you live in one of the big cities or want to commute 30 to 45 mins. highway traffic to the job, what are you gaining? Nothing. Same thing you left.

Hmm, I'd respectfully disagree with "Low cost of living means low pay". I didn't read that Eddy or any of those at this point in their lives, say this was solely about following "the heard migration to the south" or soley about money. I gathered it's about changing life's trajectory to one that will allow the pursuit of happiness. It happens to be NC is part of the consideration. It may end up being that staying in the same state and moving out west within the sate where the pace is slower will be much better.

I'm a firm believer in "eating", and one needs money to do that . However, it doesn't make sense to continue to do something that you totally dread, time spent is time not recovered. We have so many more options than we give ourselves credit for, and it's so easy to be locked in by fear of not losing a job. One of the greatest heartaches is regret of not trying.
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Old 10-02-2006, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Howell NJ...for now
58 posts, read 218,116 times
Reputation: 34
Eddy... For what it's worth, we were strongly considering the move about 2 months ago. Then we paid a visit (Lake Norman) area, and since returning home, our interest has backed off a bit. Not because we didn't like it, but because we now appreciate what we already have just a little bit more. It doesn't minimize our situation, nor does it correct the shortcomings we have already identified about where we are. But we saw the glass a little more full after our research.

The biggest thing for me is the daunting task of re-establishing everything we have now, especially all the work involved in setting up our home. Took me a lot of time and effort when we did it the first time without kids...now I'd have to do it with 2 under age 6. E-gads...

Good luck!
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Old 10-02-2006, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Howell NJ...for now
58 posts, read 218,116 times
Reputation: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miker2069 View Post
However, it doesn't make sense to continue to do something that you totally dread, time spent is time not recovered. We have so many more options than we give ourselves credit for, and it's so easy to be locked in by fear of not losing a job. One of the greatest heartaches is regret of not trying.
Very well said...and something that does contribute to our outlook...
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Old 10-02-2006, 12:53 PM
Status: "Life is a hard teacher gives the test 1st" (set 28 days ago)
 
Location: Charlotte,NC, US, North America, Earth, Alpha Quadrant,Milky Way Galaxy
3,375 posts, read 4,698,210 times
Reputation: 1705
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liz Ann View Post
My point Mike is that people do tend to get into a herd mentality, and focus on one area. Right now it's NC/SC. People tend to (a) believe what they read and not all of what they see, they think it will be different for "them"; (b) believe it's gotta' be so because it's on the internet. They need to realize that if they come from a high income area to a low income area,things will be drastically different and they may never be able "to go back" unless they stashed a bucketful of cash.

Like Cassie in prior posts, I am also a straight shooter, and will tell it like it is. I'm not trying to discourage people who are making an intelligent informed decision, just weighing in on the pros and cons. Everyone is tired of the *stress, congestion, high cost of lilving in certain areas and people want to move for different reasons. It goes *with the territory of high salaries and so forth. Anyone seriously considering relocation needs to sit down with a financial planner. There will always be "popular" areas spawned from websites like "Find Your Spot", "Best Places to Retire", "Best this, and best that". I'm a firm believer in taking plenty of vacations, investigate the area thoroughly, get on the back roads when the leaves are down; get the local newspapers to see what kind of jobs are in the classifieds. See what the local trends are and the politics of an area. The grass is not always greener. I've seen people decide a place is "for them" after staying over a weekend or 3 or 4 days. They could say: "I'm not an expert on this area, but I did stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night". lol !

That would make a great Holiday Inn commerical.

Well I see your point. Prudent planning is the best planning. It is sometimes romantic to jump off the cliff and be "free", but we never see the rest of the story at the bottom
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Old 10-02-2006, 02:09 PM
 
1,797 posts, read 3,907,537 times
Reputation: 708
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liz Ann View Post
What many people don't realilze is this: Less [money] is not more. If you make "six figures" in the northeast, or even north of the Mason Dixon line, there is no way you will make that in the south. Maybe HALF of that. Less is not more in your 401K, IRA, cost of living, relocation costs back and forth if you don't like it. Not to mention what you could do to your children tearing them away from their security and friends. What are you going to do, follow the crowd around the country like sheep looking for the cheapest place to live? Take a lesson from the Floridians ... who are trying to bail out. Folks need to give this whole relocation thing enough rationalization. It was different when large corporations would transfer folks, it was your job, you had to go and 99% made out very well with transfer bonuses and so forth. That is not the case anymore, many companies do not relo people. It costs a company between $50,000 and $75,000 to relocate one individual because they pick up many of the costs. If you do not have a steady job and a future with a company in the south, do not even consider it. Low cost of living means low pay. That's pretty much the rule, not the exception. If you live in one of the big cities or want to commute 30 to 45 mins. highway traffic to the job, what are you gaining? Nothing. Same thing you left.
Thanks for the response, but I think you misunderstood exactly what I meant by: "less is more". I meant the rat-race, the never-ending need to aquire bigger homes, bigger cars, and therefore the need for larger salaries. And it's not true that if you're making six-figures in the Northeast, that you will not do so in NC. I have plenty of friends who live in NC and GA and are actually doing better salary-wise than they were in NYC.
I have had PLENTY of experience relocating and the effects it has on a child. I myself have lived in Germany, England, South Africa and now the USA. I cherish all of my memories and the priceless education I received from moving all around the world. In my personal experience, I have learned to be a more confident and tolerant adult because my family decided to relocate more than once.
Your idea that, people who relocate to better their lives and possibly the future of their children's lives, are just "sheep following the crowd looking for the cheapest place to live" is an insult. This is one huge, wonderful country we live in, here in the United States. Not to take advantage of it's opportunities and staying "put" because it's safe, comfortable and maybe a little scary to move, is just plain stupid.
And by the way, there is not such thing as a "steady job with a secure future" with ANY company in today's world. Unless you are fortunate enough to own your own company and even then, everything depends on the economy.

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Old 10-02-2006, 02:25 PM
 
82 posts, read 341,869 times
Reputation: 74
Wow, I never thought I'd get this kind of response.
So many points of view, it's great and I deeply appreciate them all.

As far as money is concerned here is the short version of what I was thinking.

Our biggest expense is our home. Because there is such a difference in home prices between here and there. What our home would sell for even in this slow real estate market + the amount of equity we have built up would allow us to pay cash (or close to it) for a home in North Carolina.

With out that $1500 + a month mortgage payment and what I believe higher energy costs and taxes We could afford to make less money. Or at least that's what I believe.

I'm really appreciative of the folks that have reinforced the grass is always greener aspect. That's one of the things were trying to avoid. We don't want to fall in to a public relations trap and be sorry for it latter.

I never even gave North Carolina a second thought up until a few months ago. I always thought we'd end up living here until we retired and then maybe go to Florida to die (that's meant to be sarcasm in that comment, please don't get offended.)

Truthfully, North Carolina came up due to a lot of Internet research. We blew a lot of it off as hype and great media add campaigns but when we factored in the weather, housing costs, culture and environment we looked a little deeper.
The people on this site, their openness and honesty has been some of the best info we've found.

We started thinking about "The Quality of Life" we are living. How much time in a day, week, month do we really get to enjoy ourselves or each other and ways we could improve on that.
.

One way was if we could get rid of our mortgage payment.
I have a friend that works 60 + hours a week, week ends, has investment property he's always working on. He's done this since we were kids and he's still at it. His theory is he'll slow down and enjoy life when he retires.
He should be able to do that early at 55. But #1 he can never get the time he's already lost by being away from home all the time #2 we could be dead by then and #3 I don't want to wait a day longer then I have two. Even if it means semi-retirement early, a little longer and waiting until I'm 63 or god forbid 65 to fully retire.

I just seems two many people are living there lives as if its a race instead of a journey. I hate that feeling.

Maybe this is all there is for us. Maybe were asking for to much. Maybe no such place exist. Maybe Dorothy was right when she said "there's no place like home". Maybe we are just looking over the rainbow and thinking the grass is greener on the other side.
I still believe it is by the way.

I'm guessing we'll be watching things very closely for the next 6 or 7 years before we make any kind of permanent move but will end up moving out of the area.

I was more curious as to why those that did move did so when they did. What was the deciding factor, the final straw that put them over the hump. That kind of thing.

Last edited by Eddy G; 10-02-2006 at 02:33 PM..
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Old 10-02-2006, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Lake Norman Area
1,226 posts, read 2,599,003 times
Reputation: 916
Quote:
Originally Posted by kellex View Post
We are moving from South Florida to North Carolina. I am in my mid-forties and my husband is older. Our children are ten and twelve. I grew up in Wellesley, Mass. If I were you, I'd hate to leave the Boston area. My husband will not move that far north. I don't believe North Carolina will be the next Florida any time soon. There is too much land and if that were to happen it would take 15 or 20 years! Where we are moving from in Florida, most of the lots are zero lot lines, which means you are looking into your neighbors windows! Our house is on about a 1/3 of an acre but it's still too crowded! Where in Boston are you and why don't you like it?
I disagree. NC is like this:

People are not moving here and spreading out, they are relocating all in the same areas. Just look at the interest in the Lake Norman area and the Cary areas, thats the only places people care about. 15 - 20 years to be like Florida? Have you been to NC?

On the quiet part of Lake Norman, ie Denver, a Walmart Supercenter, Lowes Home Improvement, two more shopping centers 100,000 square feet each to be completed by 2007 sometime, endless housing developments, should I go on? There is no interstate going thru this area or even a 4 lane road, all built on 2 lane roads!
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Old 10-02-2006, 04:02 PM
 
Location: State of Bliss :-)
463 posts, read 1,149,472 times
Reputation: 162
Default When History Repeats Itself

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddy G View Post
I was more curious as to why those that did move did so when they did. What was the deciding factor, the final straw that put them over the hump. That kind of thing.
Well, once upon a time we lived in a beautiful, rural Virginia county. Some of the last of the undeveloped horse country outside of Washington, D.C. We had a reasonable 35-40 minute commute through gorgeous scenery. We had a home that we loved. We had good jobs. And bit by bit, the farmland and the areas around us were sold off to developers. I remember when the first town homes went in. One end of the county that was all dairy farms is almost all gone now- filled with strips malls and subdivision after subdivision. Traffic is horrendous there, a literal crawl through stoplight after stoplight, even to get to a grocery store. Our end was a bit more protected - but it became the area where lotsa wealthy folks or people with equity in their homes from other areas moved out, paid 200 K for an acre of land and built a MCMansion on it, or paid top dollar for a new construction home on a postage stamp sized lot- 'cause it was cheap to them compared to where they used to live. Then our lovely county was named the #1 rural place to live in America by one of those silly magazines and people flocked there, driving up land and housing values even more. A reasonable commute turned into two hours each way in bumper to bumper gridlock. No jobs were brought in locally, though, other than low paying retail and big box stores. They (the newcomers) wanted 22 million dollar rec centers and all of the bells and whistles that they had left behind.

IOW's- they wanted to turn it into what they'd left ---- which the locals were quite content without.

The final straw for us? Last November ( 2005) real estate assessments increased by an OUTRAGEOUS 150-200 % countywide. Done by a NC firm, btw, which the VA county hired to do the re-assessments. Since an acre of land was valued at 200K per the firm and the Board of Assessors, due to all of the outsiders who were willing to pay that, and we had two acres, we were hit hard. (That doesn't include the increase in the value of the house) We did contest it, fought tooth and nail, and got $53,000 dollars dropped from the value of the land, (which due to the length of the process we didn't learn until after selling and moving) but it was still 2 and 1/2 times the previous taxable value.. in only 4 years.

Few people seem to realize that in flocking to "lower cost" areas they're recreating the same scenarios they wanted to escape to begin with. Minus the great jobs, benefits, schools, services, etc. that many of them once had.

My recommendation... take a long vacation, enjoy life a bit. Reflect upon what you have to be thankful for and how much you've been able to provide to you and yours and think about other options, 'cause once what you have is gone, you may miss it more than you ever dreamed that you would.

Regards,

Cassie

Last edited by Cassie; 10-02-2006 at 05:26 PM..
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Old 10-02-2006, 04:54 PM
 
Location: reidsville, nc
21 posts, read 60,851 times
Reputation: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carolina_native View Post
I disagree. NC is like this:

People are not moving here and spreading out, they are relocating all in the same areas. Just look at the interest in the Lake Norman area and the Cary areas, thats the only places people care about. 15 - 20 years to be like Florida? Have you been to NC?

On the quiet part of Lake Norman, ie Denver, a Walmart Supercenter, Lowes Home Improvement, two more shopping centers 100,000 square feet each to be completed by 2007 sometime, endless housing developments, should I go on? There is no interstate going thru this area or even a 4 lane road, all built on 2 lane roads!
Well, we are not moving to to areas that you mentioned, we are moving to Reidsville in Rockingham County. I have been to NC very often (we were married there) and have visited the mountains, the coast, the cities, the foothills, etc. We have decided that whatever time we have in the environment we have chosen is better than time we would spend here.
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Old 10-02-2006, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Lake Norman Area
1,226 posts, read 2,599,003 times
Reputation: 916
Default Cassie

Cassie,

What you said is very true, and especially true for the area where I live, in Denver. If you told someone 10 years ago there would be condos and a Walmart built here, they would have laughed in your face.

I know that after living here my whole life and seeing land after land sold to developers and roads clogged I will have to move further out in the county. I wonder how many grocery stores and strip malls you could possibly need every 2 miles.
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