U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-20-2013, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
10,389 posts, read 19,336,061 times
Reputation: 11265

Advertisements

The more they degrade the teaching profession, the more GOOD teachers they will lose (the ones who can find jobs elsewhere and get more respect). This is true in any profession, actually--"cracking down" and making the job less attractive generally runs out the ones who are able to find something else, which is usually the very ones you'd like to keep. If there were a glut of good (or competent) teachers in the state, this might be a good way to thin the herd, but with the explosive population growth in this state and teachers getting less and less respect, teaching is an area where they should be raising the motivations to enter it, not removing them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-20-2013, 05:22 PM
 
9,198 posts, read 21,809,818 times
Reputation: 8537
Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
If you think that it's a good idea to remove tenure, it will have one of two results. Either the teachers will band together & fight it in court or they will unionize & that will end up in court, & the state will lose & it will open up all state employees to unionizing.

How do I know that state laws & practices about unionizing will be struck down? It happened in Maryland about 20 years ago.
What's so special about teachers that they will successfully strike down a law in NC that every other NC state employee is already subject to?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-20-2013, 06:08 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
21,844 posts, read 27,103,048 times
Reputation: 8900
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHTransplant View Post
What's so special about teachers that they will successfully strike down a law in NC that every other NC state employee is already subject to?
I worked a state job in MD, years ago. Everyone had to sign a paper that they would not attempt to unionize. Someone took it to court & the courts found that to be illegal. What I said is that if the teachers are pushed enough to unionize it will go to court & be upheld & that opens the doors to every other state employee to join a union. Hope that's clearer for you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-20-2013, 07:04 PM
 
3,095 posts, read 4,117,631 times
Reputation: 2528
Elections have consequences. Those hick clowns are determined to turn North Carolina into Talibama.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-21-2013, 07:01 AM
 
9,198 posts, read 21,809,818 times
Reputation: 8537
Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
I worked a state job in MD, years ago. Everyone had to sign a paper that they would not attempt to unionize. Someone took it to court & the courts found that to be illegal. What I said is that if the teachers are pushed enough to unionize it will go to court & be upheld & that opens the doors to every other state employee to join a union. Hope that's clearer for you.
There are already public sector unions in NC, but the issues over which they can collectively bargain is limited by state law. Sounds like a much different situation than Maryland.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-21-2013, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Salisbury,NC
10,482 posts, read 4,357,012 times
Reputation: 4621
The guys that have the majority in the state are the worst business people. We do not pay teachers enough to stay in the profession, without some form of benefit, our kids and grandkids will be hurt.

Remember you get what you pay for. Lower pay means lower quality of employee. The reasoning behind the Gov. giving out raises to the staff in Raleigh.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-21-2013, 08:49 AM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
1,969 posts, read 3,063,557 times
Reputation: 2884
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boss View Post
The guys that have the majority in the state are the worst business people. We do not pay teachers enough to stay in the profession, without some form of benefit, our kids and grandkids will be hurt.

Remember you get what you pay for. Lower pay means lower quality of employee. The reasoning behind the Gov. giving out raises to the staff in Raleigh.
Well, that and their inability to feed their families without the raises, of course
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-21-2013, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Salisbury,NC
10,482 posts, read 4,357,012 times
Reputation: 4621
Quote:
Originally Posted by topchief1 View Post
Well, that and their inability to feed their families without the raises, of course
Yup after 3 years of no raises 1% is the same as zero.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-21-2013, 09:40 AM
 
11,765 posts, read 21,347,140 times
Reputation: 11424
NC teachers don't look on paper to make much money but compared to private sector jobs they receive significant benefits, mostly pension retirement and healthcare costs.

I showed on here several times how even a new hire teacher @ ~$35k/yr is making the same as a private sector teacher making in the $50's. The pension is a huge contributor, people don't realize this.

If you want teachers to make more fine, cut the pension and they can invest $1500-$2000/month like the rest of us for a shot at a semi-decent retirement.

Also it might be in the teachers interest to flatten the pay scale, higher initial pay with lower top end. In my industry we have the same thing, low initial pay (you think $35k is low, try $12-$20k for a few years) with a higher pay the longer you have been around. One downside is if you switch jobs, you start at the bottom of the pay scale yet again. Union leadership tend to have more higher longevity folks, so they want the top pay to be high.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-21-2013, 11:58 AM
 
9,198 posts, read 21,809,818 times
Reputation: 8537
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boss View Post
Yup after 3 years of no raises 1% is the same as zero.
A lot of individuals in a lot of professions in a lot of industries have gone without raises during the recession and its aftermath. (I personally went 4 years without one. And 50% of the people in my department were let go.) The fact that teachers and other public sector employees have also done without raises doesn't generate a lot of sympathy for me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. | Please obey Forum Rules | Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top