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Old 04-17-2013, 08:09 AM
 
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In reality it seems there are no "new" boomtowns in NC....there are existing communities that continue to boom...towns around the Triangle and around Charlotte that have been booming for over 2 decades. I listed Greenville and Wilmington (which also have boomtown suburbs), which have been booming for two decades.

For the most part the Triad, Fayetteville, Jacksonville and Asheville have remained about the same or shown normal growth rates in their population. Are there any suburbs around the Triad that have boomed (like an Apex, Huntersville, Winterville or Leland?)....honestly I don't know.

Population growth in the numbers can occur that is actually not real growth...examples include Jacksonville annexing Camp Lejeune or Windsor adding 1,000 because of a prison being built.

On smaller scales, you may have counties that have boomed...Camden Co and Currituck Co have boomed because of their proximity to the Tidewater area and lower cost of housing....until the housing market really recovers it has stagnated....Carteret Co may be considered booming, although at a slower rate.
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Old 04-17-2013, 08:53 AM
 
Location: NC
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Unemployment rate alone doesn't tell the whole story; without even checking the stats, I'm sure Mecklenburg and Wake also have higher unemployment. And I don't know the history behind Greensboro's unemployment numbers, whether it's more so recession-related or not, but it has a much broader industrial and educational base, as well as more developed infrastructure and a good location, to build on in terms of developing the elements necessary to become a "boomtown." Realistically though, it might register an uptick in terms of growth in the near future but won't see Charlotte- or Triangle-like growth anytime soon.
That is probably because you didn't check the stats.

Meck is below the state average and Wake is going gang busters with one of the lowest unemployment rates in the state.

Greensboro is better then it was but it is still a lot worse then wake and somewhat worse then Meck.

N.C. county-by-county unemployment rates :: WRAL.com

I also have to say having lived in Greensboro for years I don't agree with you about Greensboro in any of those catagories. Greensboro's base was traditionally textiles and manufacturing and while they have transitioned to education somewhat they don't have anything a strong as the technology/government/education/health sector in Raleigh and the financial stuff in Charolotte, even though Charlotte took a beating this recession Greensboro got it worse. Greensboro also is a bunch of sprawl which in some areas is increasingly becoming blighted and at least as far as water goes it doesn't have the resources Wake and Meck do.
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Old 04-17-2013, 09:02 AM
 
Location: NC
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Originally Posted by HP91 View Post
In reality it seems there are no "new" boomtowns in NC....there are existing communities that continue to boom...towns around the Triangle and around Charlotte that have been booming for over 2 decades. I listed Greenville and Wilmington (which also have boomtown suburbs), which have been booming for two decades.

For the most part the Triad, Fayetteville, Jacksonville and Asheville have remained about the same or shown normal growth rates in their population. Are there any suburbs around the Triad that have boomed (like an Apex, Huntersville, Winterville or Leland?)....honestly I don't know.

Population growth in the numbers can occur that is actually not real growth...examples include Jacksonville annexing Camp Lejeune or Windsor adding 1,000 because of a prison being built.

On smaller scales, you may have counties that have boomed...Camden Co and Currituck Co have boomed because of their proximity to the Tidewater area and lower cost of housing....until the housing market really recovers it has stagnated....Carteret Co may be considered booming, although at a slower rate.
Greenville is definitely doing well because of ECU. Carteret county is actually quite built up, just no one actually is there for 6 months out of the year.
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Old 04-17-2013, 10:03 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Randomstudent View Post
Greenville is definitely doing well because of ECU. Carteret county is actually quite built up, just no one actually is there for 6 months out of the year.
Should be noted that much of Greenville's growth is attributed to two things...the Health Science Campus/Vidant Medical Center growth as well as many folks relocating from rural areas in ENC to the city where there are actual jobs (many service sector). The actual increase in student population of ECU is about 4,000 or so since the mid 90's...that of course doesn't simply explain a 25,000 population increase in the same time frame in Greenville. Winterville has gone from about 2,000 to 10,000 in the same time frame as well.
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Old 04-17-2013, 11:36 AM
 
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Originally Posted by HP91 View Post
For the most part the Triad, Fayetteville, Jacksonville and Asheville have remained about the same or shown normal growth rates in their population. Are there any suburbs around the Triad that have boomed (like an Apex, Huntersville, Winterville or Leland?)....honestly I don't know.
High Point, Jamestown, Clemmons, Kernersville, Burlington, Mebane, etc. They're all growing as fast as Clayton or Mooresville.
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Old 04-17-2013, 12:28 PM
 
Location: NC
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Originally Posted by J. Pederman View Post
High Point, Jamestown, Clemmons, Kernersville, Burlington, Mebane, etc. They're all growing as fast as Clayton or Mooresville.
Not really, Clayton and Mooresville grew at around 50% last decade. None of the cities you mention grew at over 50% and the only one close to that rate was Jamestown. Most were growing in the 20-35% range.

Aside from that Mebane is about as close to the Triangle as it is to the Triad.
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Old 04-17-2013, 02:50 PM
 
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Originally Posted by J. Pederman View Post
High Point, Jamestown, Clemmons, Kernersville, Burlington, Mebane, etc. They're all growing as fast as Clayton or Mooresville.
They are growing, which is a good thing...but just to keep it in perspective, this thread was about "boomtowns"...I listed Wilmington and Greenville....to put it into numbers and take out annexations you can look at the county data

Between 2000-2010

Alamance Co grew 14.6%....impressive (I think some of the Triangle may be rubbing off here as well)

Guilford Co grew 13.7%...not too shabby

Pitt Co grew 20.4%...that's booming.

New Hanover Co grew 20.9%...and thats not including Brunswick and Pender growth.

And to put Greenville's growth into perspective consider that there are towns in the county that have not grown at all in Grifton and Bethel and probably Ayden.
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Old 04-17-2013, 03:54 PM
 
Location: NC
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Originally Posted by HP91 View Post
They are growing, which is a good thing...but just to keep it in perspective, this thread was about "boomtowns"...I listed Wilmington and Greenville....to put it into numbers and take out annexations you can look at the county data

Between 2000-2010

Alamance Co grew 14.6%....impressive (I think some of the Triangle may be rubbing off here as well)

Guilford Co grew 13.7%...not too shabby

Pitt Co grew 20.4%...that's booming.

New Hanover Co grew 20.9%...and thats not including Brunswick and Pender growth.

And to put Greenville's growth into perspective consider that there are towns in the county that have not grown at all in Grifton and Bethel and probably Ayden.
Yeah, but to put this in context.

Between 2000-2010

Wake 43.5%

Mecklenburg 32.2%

Union 62.8%

Cabarrus 35.8%

Chatham 28.74%

Johnston 34%

Greenville, Willimington and imho Asheville all have potential to boom but they aren't quite there yet.
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Old 04-17-2013, 04:18 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Randomstudent View Post
Not really, Clayton and Mooresville grew at around 50% last decade. None of the cities you mention grew at over 50% and the only one close to that rate was Jamestown. Most were growing in the 20-35% range.

Aside from that Mebane is about as close to the Triangle as it is to the Triad.
Clayton and Moorseville were a lot smaller a decade ago, so the percentage of growth seems impressive. In terms of actual people, they're all adding roughly the same numbers at this point. Alamance County in particular had been stagnant for almost three decades prior to a shift toward growth starting in the mid-late 90s. Obviously the proximity to the Triangle is responsible for much of that, but officially they're considered part of the Triad.
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Old 04-17-2013, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Charlotte
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Originally Posted by J. Pederman View Post
Clayton and Moorseville were a lot smaller a decade ago, so the percentage of growth seems impressive. In terms of actual people, they're all adding roughly the same numbers at this point. Alamance County in particular had been stagnant for almost three decades prior to a shift toward growth starting in the mid-late 90s. Obviously the proximity to the Triangle is responsible for much of that, but officially they're considered part of the Triad.
That's like saying Iredell County's proximity to the Triad is responsible for the growth, but it's considered part of Metrolina...
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