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Old 04-18-2013, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bmachina View Post
So Charlotte turns brown and trees lose leaves in the winter?

If I drove south from Charlotte, in the middle of the winter, where would I start hitting green areas where things are still alive all winter?
Probably a question for the South Carolina board Or a weather/climate map.
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Old 04-18-2013, 12:57 PM
 
Location: NC
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Weather wise the real question is Northwestern North Carolina vs. Southeastern North Carolina. The there are a lot of palms once you get down towards the coast particularly south of the outer banks. The weather also tends to be warmer.

It is more of a coast vs. mountains thing then a North v. South thing.

I also cannot say I know of any part of North Carolina where trees don't turn in the winter except possibly some islands where most of the trees are evergreens.
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Old 08-30-2015, 03:41 PM
 
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Traveling south from charlotte you will begin to see evergreen live oaks and other trees of the deep south near and just south of Columbia sc. Traveling east you will see these trees growing naturally starting around rockingham nc in richland county. Spanish moss also begins to show up on trees along rivers and in swamps just east of rockingham around laurinburg nc in Scotland county..to the south moss begins to be seen in and just east of Columbia. So charlotte is generally about 80 to 100 miles away from trees and plants associated with the coastal south..but if transplanted most any of the trees and plants you see in sc or eastern nc will survive in charlotte. Including several types of hardy palms..spanish moss also will grow in charlotte especially near water..however it will not thrive and spread as well due to lower humidity..and birds often pull it off trees faster than it can grow for nesting materials..citrus will not survive outside of florida and the immediate coast line from Charleston sc southward..many places in inland north florida is too cold for citrus so forget it anywhere in north carolina
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Old 08-30-2015, 11:18 PM
 
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NC weather is geographically divided by the Mountains/Foothills; the Piedmont; and the Coastal Plain. There's where you'll find a difference in climate across the state - not so much northern and southern NC.

Palm trees are all along the coast and grow inland to a certain point (not sure exactly where the cutoff point is). You can see a few palms as far in as Raleigh or Charlotte, but I'm not sure if they can survive the winters without being covered up...they may grow all across the Coastal Plain and into the Piedmont of NC, but they would have to be protected in winter in many of those places. Atlanta has then but they must be covered in the winter to survive.

Atlanta's weather is very comparable to Winston-Salem's, being at the foot of the Appalachian Mountains with suburban areas reaching up into the foothills; they are also at a similar elevation, with both cities being around 1,000' above sea level. Atlanta tends to generally be a degree or two warmer than W-S in all seasons, and W-S gets a bit more snowfall. Both cities are right along the edge of the same Hardiness Zone between zone 7 and zone 8, meaning the climate is similar for growing plants.
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Old 09-01-2015, 10:27 PM
 
Location: Lexington, KY
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Lol, palms in central SC are far from tropical. The Sabal is hardy down to 7F. Growing culture makes a big difference, after all it's the "palmetto state". Landscaped palm trees seem to be more abundant in Columbia SC than warmer places in other states, such as Mobile, AL.
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Old 09-02-2015, 07:38 AM
 
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I'm from Raleigh but went to college in Greensboro for a few years. Greensboro is much colder, more snow and a biting wind. Not only is it slightly further north but also in the Upper Piedmont closer to the Blue Ridge, and Winston-Salem falls in the same boat. I like to jokingly call Raleigh and the Research Triangle a "giant, incredibly humid longleaf pine forest." I think it's much more humid than Greensboro, but I don't know about Charlotte as I rarely go down there.
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Old 09-02-2015, 10:08 AM
 
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I lived in Atlanta, Charlotte and Raleigh. Really the only noticeable difference is Atlanta has a shorter warmer Winter most years. Summers are the same. Rainfall and humidity IMO are similar. Charlotte may be a degree or two warmer in April and early May.
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Old 09-02-2015, 12:45 PM
 
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I don't think Raleigh and Atlanta are very different when it comes to weather. People freak if snow hits either city.
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Old 09-02-2015, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Lexington, KY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
I like to jokingly call Raleigh and the Research Triangle a "giant, incredibly humid longleaf pine forest." I think it's much more humid than Greensboro, but I don't know about Charlotte as I rarely go down there.
Very little difference between Raleigh and Greensboro. Charlotte is a bit lower and it's higher near the coast.

Annual mean relative humidity from NOAA:

Charlotte: 67.4%
Greensboro: 69.5%
Raleigh: 70.2%
Wilmington: 73.7%
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Old 09-02-2015, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Lizard Lick, NC
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palm trees in NC are everywhere but not naturally outside of the coast. they certainly aren't extremely wide spread but they are here. for the person who said we can grow windmill palms in Wilmington lol. windmill palms grow all the way in the mountains and are cold hardy to sub zero temps I believe. here in Raleigh the most common palms are sabal minor sabal palms and windmill s being the most common. sable palms are grown a lot here in my part of wake county I even saw a subway that had 5 medium sized sabal palms growing outside unfortunately they where killed this winter as where many other sabal palms but I also saw many sabal palms that survived this winter .many businesses grow palms here. places like restaurants and gas stations tend to be the businesses that seem to grow the most palms. palms in Raleigh are widely grown but not indigenous to the area. as for charlotte the majority of palms there are windmills also sabal palms are grown there also but Raleigh seems to grow more of those than charlotte although I saw a restaurant in concord with 4 large sabal palms that looked extremely healthy. I love seeing palms and as more people move here many more palms are planted as people like experimenting with them here. charlotte tends to be less humid than Raleigh for instance look at today Raleigh had a lower temp than charlotte but had higher humidity versus charlotte having less humidity but a hotter temp. g8rcat nice seeing you here its been a while since I last posted in the forums at all but I still check every day.
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