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Old 01-30-2018, 07:36 PM
 
6,270 posts, read 9,984,861 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by architect77 View Post
I’m sorry, I should have used Richmond as an example of a low-slung skyline.

I’m a native of Raleigh area, and nothing is planned or built with large-city components. They even have a ridiculous stepped building height limit for downtown.

Raleigh folks just stay busy living. Without campaigning, the Triangle has continuously received praise since 1994. And the reason the country is so enamored is because the area is all about quality & high standards for all aspects of the area (Wake County Pubic schools), Union Station, greenways, always under the radar, never trying to impress the country or world.

And because of the non-stop national attention and flattery, Raleigh only thinks about development projects once they arrive & then city leaders come up with something humble in appearance & but of very high quality.

I know my native area...
Or maybe Raleigh's built environment fits a city/metro of 460k and 1.35 million? Tulsa, OKC, Grand Rapids, Omaha, Louisville, Toledo, Memphis, Des Moines and many others have similar downtowns (when it comes to the skylines; NOT the actual look and feel). All are metros in the 600k to 1.4 million range.

Downtown Durham looks like the center of a 600k metro. Downtown Raleigh looks like the center of a 1.35 million metro. I'm not sure why some people are disappointed with central Raleigh. Raleigh is doing just fine for its size.

Last edited by urbancharlotte; 01-30-2018 at 07:45 PM..

 
Old 01-30-2018, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Carrboro, NC
1,460 posts, read 1,434,957 times
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Yeah, pretty much. While economically, the Triangle punches higher than these other regions, it is very decentralized and the urban environments in the cities reflect their MSA size pretty accurately. Better mass transit and planning would cause the downtowns to function more like urban neighborhoods in a metro of 2+ million. Hopefully we will see that some day.
 
Old 01-31-2018, 06:18 AM
 
180 posts, read 99,950 times
Reputation: 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancharlotte View Post
Or maybe Raleigh's built environment fits a city/metro of 460k and 1.35 million? Tulsa, OKC, Grand Rapids, Omaha, Louisville, Toledo, Memphis, Des Moines and many others have similar downtowns (when it comes to the skylines; NOT the actual look and feel). All are metros in the 600k to 1.4 million range.

Downtown Durham looks like the center of a 600k metro. Downtown Raleigh looks like the center of a 1.35 million metro. I'm not sure why some people are disappointed with central Raleigh. Raleigh is doing just fine for its size.
OKC has the Devon Center, at 844 feet it's just 27 feet shorter than BOA Charlotte tower. I traveled from LA to NC and stopped by OKC and that's a pretty tower once you add the world-class botanical garden next to it. Since nothing else is as tall it dominants the skyline dramatically.
 
Old 01-31-2018, 09:47 AM
 
479 posts, read 244,850 times
Reputation: 615
I remember living back in Raleigh maybe 2006-2007 and there were a few tower cranes up at the time, including one for the current tallest building. It was quite a sight to see.
 
Old 01-31-2018, 10:02 AM
 
29,584 posts, read 27,062,332 times
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The sectors that power Raleigh's economy--tech, eds and meds, government--aren't prone to build a bunch of office towers. Charlotte's economy is much more corporate in nature--hence, more towers.
 
Old 01-31-2018, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Washington DC
3,720 posts, read 3,251,195 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
The sectors that power Raleigh's economy--tech, eds and meds, government--aren't prone to build a bunch of office towers. Charlotte's economy is much more corporate in nature--hence, more towers.
The highrise booms in Nashville and Austin seem to be predominately residential in nature. Austin seems much, much more skewed towards residential than any non-coastal city I can think of.

austin texas by John Gusky, on Flickr

Austin, Texas by alvaroreguly, on Flickr


Not long ago Austin's downtown was no bigger than downtown Raleigh



Now it's this

Humid Morning by Keith Shuley, on Flickr




Austin is also government and lots of tech. Austin completely values the whole "quality/quantity" thing also, they're known for that. So big residential buildings can coexist with being weird and not corporate. And they kept a lot of their lowrise buildings. I'm not sure why Austin's residential booms as much as it does. But it does.

Last edited by Charlotte485; 01-31-2018 at 10:52 AM..
 
Old 01-31-2018, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Charlotte
2,830 posts, read 2,536,142 times
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One thing Charlotte has over Austin and Nashville is its airport.

Busiest airports in USA
Charlotte Douglas International Airport #9 some have CLT at #11
Nashville International Airport #33
Austin–Bergstrom International Airport #35
RDU # 38

Charlotte and Raleigh has the two busiest airports in North Carolina.


I was surprise to see Austin and San Antonio airports are not top 30 ports in the USA. The big airports in Texas are Dallas and Houston.


When CLT get a new forth parallel runway and all those new gates I expect it will move up in rankings.

Last edited by CLT1985; 01-31-2018 at 11:19 AM..
 
Old 01-31-2018, 11:40 AM
 
29,584 posts, read 27,062,332 times
Reputation: 18139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlotte485 View Post
The highrise booms in Nashville and Austin seem to be predominately residential in nature. Austin seems much, much more skewed towards residential than any non-coastal city I can think of.
Very true, but it seems that Austin has more jobs in the core of the city so those workers can live close to their jobs in all those new residential developments.

Quote:
Austin is also government and lots of tech. Austin completely values the whole "quality/quantity" thing also, they're known for that. So big residential buildings can coexist with being weird and not corporate. And they kept a lot of their lowrise buildings. I'm not sure why Austin's residential booms as much as it does. But it does.
Yeah it looks a bit weird though. Austin's new skyline seems to resemble Miami's or Vancouver's.
 
Old 01-31-2018, 11:54 AM
 
5,138 posts, read 3,251,177 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Yeah it looks a bit weird though. Austin's new skyline seems to resemble Miami's or Vancouver's.
You can make many skylines look like others depending on where the picture is taken, it's all in the angles!
 
Old 01-31-2018, 11:59 AM
 
180 posts, read 99,950 times
Reputation: 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlotte485 View Post
The highrise booms in Nashville and Austin seem to be predominately residential in nature. Austin seems much, much more skewed towards residential than any non-coastal city I can think of.


Austin is also government and lots of tech. Austin completely values the whole "quality/quantity" thing also, they're known for that. So big residential buildings can coexist with being weird and not corporate. And they kept a lot of their lowrise buildings. I'm not sure why Austin's residential booms as much as it does. But it does.
Austin was the 'it' city of the 2000's and 2010's for hip, young transplants with Nashville becoming another 'it' city later on around 2008-10. Now that both cities had have exploding cost of living young transplants are looking for other locations and Raleigh is at the pre-stage of being another 'it' city--all this growth Raleigh has right now was just normal US South growth trends--once Californians start pouring in you'll start to see 50 floor residential towers being requested by developers in Raleigh. Not just in DTR, Kane-diland AKA North Hills will be prominent high rise area. Downtown Raleigh right now is over 97% apartment occupancy rate as well speak.

That being said the Raleigh City Council is pretty directionless when it comes to vertical growth. Which is okay for right now since they're focusing on great downtown amenities/services like a central park, new public transport, road improvements so once vertical growth is unavoidable we will have all the services in place.
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