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Old 06-01-2016, 12:07 PM
 
2,361 posts, read 2,660,218 times
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Hard to believe but they want to eliminate state-paid health retirement benefits for teachers and state employees who are hired after January 1, 2016. That's right, let's make it harder to recruit teachers in a state that ranks 41 out of 50 for teacher pay.



Read it here
Senate budget ends health retirement benefits for future teachers and state employees The Progressive Pulse

and here
Senate pushes to eliminate health retirement benefits for North Carolina
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Old 06-01-2016, 12:14 PM
 
3,774 posts, read 7,010,460 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mlhm5 View Post
Hard to believe but they want to eliminate state-paid health retirement benefits for teachers and state employees who are hired after January 1, 2016. That's right, let's make it harder to recruit teachers in a state that ranks 41 out of 50 for teacher pay.



Read it here
Senate budget ends health retirement benefits for future teachers and state employees The Progressive Pulse

and here
Senate pushes to eliminate health retirement benefits for North Carolina
I'm as critical of this GA as anyone.

But let's not make the same mistake that all the northern cities have made with their untenable retirement benefits. That said, I hope they couple the legislation with pay increases so that employees can live AND save money... Like the rest of us.
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Old 06-01-2016, 01:34 PM
Status: "North of Palm Trees, South of High Taxes" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Noth Caccalacca
5,602 posts, read 6,693,417 times
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This action by the GA will drive another nail into the coffin of quality education in North Carolina. Benefits are one of the few attractions to civil service jobs and if this state cuts them or eliminates them there will be absolutely no reason to become an educator in NC.

For too long, the legislature has ridden roughshod over the teachers and state employees. Perhaps it is time for NC teachers and state employees to stop acting like a bunch of scared sheep and start hitting back! Staging a coordinated week-long sickout in the major cities might get them a little attention. No one is going to respect you if you allow everyone to walk all over you! Maybe the namby-pamby Teachers Associations should grow a pair and hire a few goons to "kneecap" a select number of legislators. That might change their little minds quickly!
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Old 06-01-2016, 02:29 PM
 
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I really do not understand the mindset of elected state officials who feel they must punish state workers.
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Old 06-01-2016, 03:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Native_Son View Post
I'm as critical of this GA as anyone.

But let's not make the same mistake that all the northern cities have made with their untenable retirement benefits. That said, I hope they couple the legislation with pay increases so that employees can live AND save money... Like the rest of us.
I teach in Massachusetts and we do not have "untenable retirement benefits" for teachers. Our students also rank #1 nationally in Math and English. The education of a state's children should be Priority #1. You must pay a good wage and offer good retirement benefits in order to attract good teachers. It is unconscionable to do otherwise.
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Old 06-01-2016, 03:07 PM
 
1,351 posts, read 751,788 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mlhm5 View Post
Hard to believe but they want to eliminate state-paid health retirement benefits for teachers and state employees who are hired after January 1, 2016. That's right, let's make it harder to recruit teachers in a state that ranks 41 out of 50 for teacher pay.
Outrage over shifting responsibility for retirement funds? It appears that the whiners are running out of things to complain about.

The raise the senate put forward would ensure that teachers hit the top of the state's teacher salary scale within fifteen years and would bring the average salary to more than $54,000 in two years.

That would make North Carolina's teacher pay the highest in the Southeast and 24th in the country.

It must suck waking up every morning looking for the storm clouds in every silver lining.
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Old 06-01-2016, 03:17 PM
 
1,880 posts, read 1,339,152 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vulfpeck View Post
Outrage over shifting responsibility for retirement funds? It appears that the whiners are running out of things to complain about.

The raise the senate put forward would ensure that teachers hit the top of the state's teacher salary scale within fifteen years and would bring the average salary to more than $54,000 in two years.

That would make North Carolina's teacher pay the highest in the Southeast and 24th in the country.

It must suck waking up every morning looking for the storm clouds in every silver lining.
Have you priced health care lately?
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Old 06-01-2016, 07:09 PM
 
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Originally Posted by vulfpeck View Post
Outrage over shifting responsibility for retirement funds? It appears that the whiners are running out of things to complain about.

The raise the senate put forward would ensure that teachers hit the top of the state's teacher salary scale within fifteen years and would bring the average salary to more than $54,000 in two years.

That would make North Carolina's teacher pay the highest in the Southeast and 24th in the country.

It must suck waking up every morning looking for the storm clouds in every silver lining.
If history is any guide the House bill will be the one that wins out which will not increase the salaries of beginning teachers, and the average of those tiers that are left would be ~4%, with the most experienced getting less than 4%.

Even if this passes there is no way the average teacher salary gets to $50K without local supplements and many school systems do not have any supplements.

I do think the measure by the Senate will catch on in the house and the bill on the governor's desk will contain the provision to eliminate state-paid health retirement benefits for teachers and state employees hired after Jan 2016.

Right now a retiree at 60 years old health care insurance premium is over ~$500 a month and increases to ~$600 a month at age 64.

That's around $33K out of their retirement until they reach Medicare age, which today is 65.
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Old 06-01-2016, 07:21 PM
 
2,684 posts, read 1,047,366 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vulfpeck View Post
Outrage over shifting responsibility for retirement funds? It appears that the whiners are running out of things to complain about.

The raise the senate put forward would ensure that teachers hit the top of the state's teacher salary scale within fifteen years and would bring the average salary to more than $54,000 in two years.

That would make North Carolina's teacher pay the highest in the Southeast and 24th in the country.

It must suck waking up every morning looking for the storm clouds in every silver lining.
$54,000 is peanuts. Bringing the salary to the top level of teachers in the Southeast is nothing to be proud of. Teachers with extensive training and experience should be making at least $75,000/year. We're talking here about the education of the state's children. I'll never understand why Americans have so little respect for the education and work of teachers. Parents and society in general today put enormous burdens on teachers; they expect miracles, but don't want to pay for it. If you want to see American children continue to fall behind their counterparts in Europe--where teachers are respected and well paid--then fine, continue to belittle teachers and deprive them of a professional salary and benefits. But remember that it's the children who suffer, as well as our nation.
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Old 06-01-2016, 07:26 PM
 
1,351 posts, read 751,788 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mlhm5 View Post
Right now a retiree at 60 years old health care insurance premium is over ~$500 a month and increases to ~$600 a month at age 64.

That's around $33K out of their retirement until they reach Medicare age, which today is 65.
If I decide to retire 5 years early, I'm on the hook to cover my own healthcare too. Was that not the case for teachers?
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