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Old 03-22-2007, 06:42 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
2,657 posts, read 7,169,781 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Waiting2go View Post
What source are YOU using for this hurricane forcast? Or is this just your opinion? I have not been able to find any reliable source to confirm this.
http://hurricane.atmos.colostate.edu.../2006/dec2006/

Quote:
Information obtained through November 2006 indicates that the 2007 Atlantic hurricane season will be more active than the average 1950-2000 season. We estimate that 2007 will have about 7 hurricanes (average is 5.9), 14 named storms (average is 9.6), 70 named storm days (average is 49.1), 35 hurricane days (average is 24.5), 3 intense (Category 3-4-5) hurricanes (average is 2.3) and 8 intense hurricane days (average is 5.0). The probability of U.S. major hurricane landfall is estimated to be about 125 percent of the long-period average.
I've found NOAA to be the best at tracking storms as they form and approach
http://www.noaa.org/ but you can rarely get a bull's eye forecast until the system gets close in.

NC man, those are very good pictures and a good explanation. Unfortunately, it seems to do very little to dissuade people as we've seen by the rapid coastal development and now the dredging of mountain sides to build homes.
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Old 03-22-2007, 09:50 AM
 
Location: From WNC, now in Raleigh
507 posts, read 2,275,533 times
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If I recall correctly, the 2006 hurricane season was supposed to be terrible. There were ten named storms of which the last five became hurricanes that remained in the Atlantic. That's about the NOAA average for a season. Once again it goes to show that you can not predict the weather. We can make an educated guess... but we will never know until it happens.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006_At...rricane_season

2004 (Notice the number in North Carolina)


2005


2006
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Old 03-22-2007, 02:25 PM
 
166 posts, read 571,907 times
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Cowboy Wilhelms said.
If I recall correctly, the 2006 hurricane season was supposed to be terrible. There were ten named storms of which the last five became hurricanes that remained in the Atlantic. That's about the NOAA average for a season. Once again it goes to show that you can not predict the weather. We can make an educated guess... but we will never know until it happens.


Couldn't have said it better myself Cowboy Wilhelm. You are so right because last years call was no where near what actually occured.
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Old 03-22-2007, 07:12 PM
 
Location: Sunny Phoenix Arizona...wishing for a beach.
4,299 posts, read 13,622,636 times
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Are these storms really bad here? I want to hear from some New Yorkers on how these thunderstorms compare to your avg storm in Ny.
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Old 03-23-2007, 11:11 PM
 
577 posts, read 1,733,310 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena View Post
Are these storms really bad here? I want to hear from some New Yorkers on how these thunderstorms compare to your avg storm in Ny.
Sheena Hurricanes and thunder storms are not the same thing. We have the same thunder storms as anyone else, A hurricane rips houses from foundations and can flood coastal areas up to roof tops and cause billions in damage as well as kill people. Did you mean something else.
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Old 03-24-2007, 05:00 AM
 
Location: Morehead City, NC
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Don't forget hurricane Hugo in 1989 that hit Charleston, SC and then progessed up and caused great damage in Charlotte.
I have lived in and or around the Morehead City, NC area for 25 years. When and if damage occurs from a huricane-It has been more "pin point bombing" not "carpert bombing" for this area.
Example: I had a home, on the water. During a cat 2 hurricane my property went unscathed-But directly across the sound from me a marina had a million dollars plus worth of damage. The distance between us was less than a half mile.
Bill
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Old 04-12-2007, 11:21 PM
 
Location: The 12th State
22,974 posts, read 58,480,053 times
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I thought I would bump this thread up since spring and summer is general time people choose to move into a new home. Dont forget North Carolina has a high ratio for receiving hurricanes and often effects more than coastal cities and that includes the mountains as shown above posts.

Kingston NC Hurricane Floyd


Make sure you check local flood plain maps of your area you plan to move to and also look at the Hurricane Floyd Map to see all the cities that suffered from this storm. Some was flooded and Hog Sewage Lagoons flooded into people homes. It wasnt a great wind storm but a massive flood storm.


If your new to this state make sure you have a evacuation plan maybe stay buddies with someone from where you are moving from as a safe haven in case you need a place to stay til a storm passes.
Tarrboro


Rick Luettich, professor of marine sciences. “We are close to the Gulf Stream, and the Outer Banks stick out from the coast. If you look back over the one hundred twenty-five years that we’ve kept track of where hurricanes strike, if you take all the hurricanes that have impacted the United States’ East and Gulf Coasts, the highest number of hurricanes have visited North Carolina.”

Hurricane Floyd killed 52 people and wrecked 17,000 homes in North Carolina




subdivision in Greenville North carolina

[
On September 21, 1989, Hurricane Hugo struck Charleston, South Carolina with winds over 135 miles per hour. Hugo caused over seven billion dollars worth of damage and set the record for the highest ever recorded storm surge on the East Coast. Hugo.s over 150 mile wide vortex of destruction claimed 82 lives

When Hugo arrived in South Carolina, wind gusts were measured at 137 mph (119 knots) with sustained winds of 87-121 mph (76-105 knots), and the storm surge reached 20 ft. above tide. Fortunately, three hours after landfall, the windspeed had dropped below hurricane force, and by the time Hugo hit Charlotte, NC 6 hours after landfall, winds were only 54 mph (47 knots) with gusts of 87 mph (76 knots). Even in that short time, Hugo caused intensive damage from South Carolina to North Carolina and over 200 miles inland. Electrical supplies were cut off, and many less well-built structures were destroyed
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Old 04-13-2007, 04:52 PM
 
284 posts, read 1,563,622 times
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SunnyKayak, this is the kind of info. that we all need! Thank you! I've heard that hurricanes can go as far inland as Raleigh. Do they board up houses there and have things like generators? Additional weather safety tips from anyone would be greatly appreciated!
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Old 04-14-2007, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Matthews
113 posts, read 407,924 times
Reputation: 52
Default NC Storms

98% of those storms are coastal in nature... but if you look at the geographiy you can see the east coast of NC jut out into the Atlantic... almost target like!

In Charlotte where we live there's been one hurricabne in best I can tell 50 years, Hurricane Hugo that smacked Charleston SC as a 4, and moved directly inland ona bee line to Charlotte. It was before we came, but memorable, they were without power about 2 weeks.

But hey, the oceans are warming.... flooding to come, who knows?
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Old 04-14-2007, 01:25 PM
 
Location: Lake Norman Area
1,472 posts, read 3,660,674 times
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NWS predicts the high possibility of strong to severe thunderstorms this evening and overnight. NWS in Oklahoma City also states there is a possibility of large tornadoes, particulary in SC, but also in the NC Piedmont and Coastal Plain this evening. Flooding is also possible in these areas, the mountains can expect several inches of snow ironically.

Source: Charlotte.com
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