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Old 02-04-2009, 06:07 PM
 
153 posts, read 294,158 times
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I am a Wisconsin dislocated corporate education executive with a background in high school teaching (English/history/social studies) who is looking into teaching jobs in three sun-belt states -- Florida, Texas, North Carolina -- for this fall. I do understand that recruiting, at least in Florida, is not what it was two or three years ago, but I am going to make my applications nonetheless and pursue this with vigor.

I hold a Florida Statement of Eligibility in English 6-12, and am about to have my credentials reviewed in Texas and North Carolina for temporary certificates. I do not anticipate major difficulties in receiving temporary certification in those states. I hold a Master of Arts in Teaching from Boston University (and a Bachelor of Arts in American Studies from Yale) and formerly held English 7-12 certification in Connecticut. The paperwork in Florida was a breeze, happily.

I would welcome any tips from knowledgeable North Carolinians (teachers and others) about searching for high school jobs in the state. I prefer urban/suburban systems to rural systems, and I'm open to public, charter, and private schools. I have experience working with disadvantaged populations, although my honest preference is to work with (at least some) high achievers. I have very good classroom management skills and rapport with students.

I am registered with Teachers-Teachers.com, TopSchoolJobs.org, and EducationAmerica.net, and am actively "working" those websites. (A lot of Florida and North Carolina jobs drive to Teachers-Teachers, and some Florida jobs to EducationAmerica also; I see more Texas positions on TopSchoolJobs. Are there other web sources for North Carolina positions, apart from individual district websites?)

All tips, advice, insights welcome, especially regarding the most promising districts.
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Old 02-05-2009, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Indian Trail near S. Charlotte
210 posts, read 445,414 times
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Work 4 NC Schools

This site has listings for some of the schools. I was at a seminar last night, and this is how your subjects would rate on the scale of need: English is a moderate need, Social Studies. history are low need. You have a good chance of getting a position starting in September. Actually, I would say with your background, you will start in September.

Math and Science are high need, so you could probably get a job before the end of this school year, and if you do special needs, you can have a job tomorrow.
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Old 02-05-2009, 04:53 PM
 
153 posts, read 294,158 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ragdoll Kitty Lover View Post
Work 4 NC Schools

This site has listings for some of the schools. I was at a seminar last night, and this is how your subjects would rate on the scale of need: English is a moderate need, Social Studies. history are low need. You have a good chance of getting a position starting in September. Actually, I would say with your background, you will start in September.

Math and Science are high need, so you could probably get a job before the end of this school year, and if you do special needs, you can have a job tomorrow.
That is encouraging! In most places, Secondary English is not the highest need, but not the lowest either. I know that Social Studies/History positions tend to go to coaches (that is true everywhere).

I will definitely check out that site thoroughly. One thing I feel confident of: if I can get to the interview stage, I'm very competitive. I have always interviewed strongly. (For that, I have to thank my own high school English teacher, who nudged me into public speaking in my freshman year. What a difference that makes.)
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Old 02-05-2009, 07:23 PM
LLN
 
Location: Upstairs closet
4,977 posts, read 8,727,347 times
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Sounds like you have some pretty good credentials, but remember some of the principals you will interviewing with are still old school...don't be "too good."

I would suggest finding geo areas you are interested in and writing the principal directly. I am in middle school, and am fortunate to have much needed skills, experience and education, so I have interviewed schools, when I have looked to move. I have never messed with the HR departments at the central offices, since there you are dealing with, well, not front line people.

I would also stress ALL the extra-curricula stuff you can do...drama club, literature club, that kind of stuff.

If you decide to come to NC, go to the NC DPI web site, under accountability, and you can view the NC Standard Course of Study objectives and requirements for all grades. It would only help your case if you knew about those and could weave your talents amongst those objectives as you spoke.

Good Luck. Remember that NC is more than Charlotte and Greensboro. There are lots of cool places besides those two (IMHO, pits) to locate.

lln
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Old 02-07-2009, 01:40 PM
 
Location: On the brink of WWIII
21,093 posts, read 23,849,260 times
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Default Teacher from Michigan to NC

I started looking for a position last month when I was given my lay off notice. I was teaching at a residential facility that houses 13-18 year old male offenders--criminal and sexual.

I started looking in New Mexico, but I guess they have so many applicants--even special education--that I had to practically have NM license in hand before getting an interview.

I went through most of the NC sites and teachers-teachers as well. Did that on a Friday and Monday morning at 9 am I had an unofficial job offer pending submission of a few documents. By Friday of the week I was offered and accepted) a position.

Based on my experience--and since, conversation with others in NC--once a district gets your resume and likes what they see...they move quickly because even though there are some positions like social studies or English that have ample qualified applicants, NC schools will go after the ones they see as fitting their districts specific needs.

I have a lot of residential and detention experience dealing with severely emotional / behavioral disabilities--just what this district was looking for..

So I would just make sure you have your documents on places like teachers-teachers and teach 4 NC and hit a few districts ion counties you might want to be in. Make your intro letter specific to your experiences and abilities and let it show what you are capable of--sell the passion you have and why you love/want to teach.
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Old 02-07-2009, 02:33 PM
 
153 posts, read 294,158 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zthatzmanz28 View Post
I started looking for a position last month when I was given my lay off notice. I was teaching at a residential facility that houses 13-18 year old male offenders--criminal and sexual.

I started looking in New Mexico, but I guess they have so many applicants--even special education--that I had to practically have NM license in hand before getting an interview.

I went through most of the NC sites and teachers-teachers as well. Did that on a Friday and Monday morning at 9 am I had an unofficial job offer pending submission of a few documents. By Friday of the week I was offered and accepted) a position.

Based on my experience--and since, conversation with others in NC--once a district gets your resume and likes what they see...they move quickly because even though there are some positions like social studies or English that have ample qualified applicants, NC schools will go after the ones they see as fitting their districts specific needs.

I have a lot of residential and detention experience dealing with severely emotional / behavioral disabilities--just what this district was looking for..

So I would just make sure you have your documents on places like teachers-teachers and teach 4 NC and hit a few districts ion counties you might want to be in. Make your intro letter specific to your experiences and abilities and let it show what you are capable of--sell the passion you have and why you love/want to teach.
That is very helpful, and exciting to hear! I am working on my NC certification paperwork this weekend, but based on what you say, I will go ahead immediately and start responding to the North Carolina postings on Teachers-Teachers.
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Old 02-08-2009, 12:21 PM
 
Location: On the brink of WWIII
21,093 posts, read 23,849,260 times
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Default Getting the job

From reading your credentials, you come across as a person who is involved in education. I can see you in a school (probably more suburban-urban) teaching that AP class. I would think that there are some NC schools that would jump at your experience. Just keep in mind the state salary guidelines. They are lower than most other places. If you are looking at being in NC and living in a 200K+ house, it may not happen with a teacher salary alone. For my wife and I, coming from MI the pay is less, but so is the housing situation that we are comfortable with--2-3 bedroom with 3/4 to 1 acre around the 100K average range.

I have talked with other people who are currently teaching in NC and surprisingly--EVERYONE simply loves it. Cannot say the same about the teachers here. Most do not like where they teach and other than the salary, they would leave teaching OR schools.

I am looking forward to being in NC and anticipate a great teaching career. Unlike MI where teachers seem to be hired for short term and replaced prior to tenure for newbies at starting salary.

Let us know how the search goes.

here are the NC counties..

Contacts for Employment

and NC postings for a lot of schools

https://schooljobs.dpi.state.nc.us/
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Old 02-08-2009, 12:45 PM
 
153 posts, read 294,158 times
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Thanks for all the additional information! I think I will be able to manage the salaries -- I lead a pretty inextravagant lifestyle. I'm single and prefer renting, so all I need is a pet-friendly apartment for me and my cat, and I'm set. I always get a two-bedroom apartment -- the second bedroom is for my library. Here in Appleton such apartments, including pet fee and garage, are to be had in the $500-600 range.

Part of what has guided my job search is comparative cost of living calculations. I use the comparison tool at BestPlaces.com. I was able to rule out California pretty quickly (despite having lived in California before, and liking it) just on the basis of the housing cost comparisons. It is insane out there.

Texas is surprisingly very inexpensive, except perhaps for Austin. North Carolina and parts of Florida are not bad (although the Miami area and the Keys are ridiculous). The Atlanta area is pretty bad; Nevada has gotten a lot more expensive across the board in recent years; New Mexico and Arizona are mixed.

The business about replacing experienced teachers with newbies at starting salary -- I think that is very prevalent in Wisconsin, too; perhaps throughout the upper Midwest. I was told flat out that with my master's degree I would never find a position here; schools would simply consider me too expensive. It is very different in the Northeast, where experience is prized. The faculty at many Wisconsin high schools look like they are students in high school themselves.

Thank you very much for the continuing encouragement and useful links. I will keep you posted.
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Old 02-08-2009, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Indian Trail near S. Charlotte
210 posts, read 445,414 times
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Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick Murtha View Post
Thanks for all the additional information! I think I will be able to manage the salaries -- I lead a pretty inextravagant lifestyle. I'm single and prefer renting, so all I need is a pet-friendly apartment for me and my cat, and I'm set. I always get a two-bedroom apartment -- the second bedroom is for my library. Here in Appleton such apartments, including pet fee and garage, are to be had in the $500-600 range.

Part of what has guided my job search is comparative cost of living calculations. I use the comparison tool at BestPlaces.com. I was able to rule out California pretty quickly (despite having lived in California before, and liking it) just on the basis of the housing cost comparisons. It is insane out there.

Texas is surprisingly very inexpensive, except perhaps for Austin. North Carolina and parts of Florida are not bad (although the Miami area and the Keys are ridiculous). The Atlanta area is pretty bad; Nevada has gotten a lot more expensive across the board in recent years; New Mexico and Arizona are mixed.

The business about replacing experienced teachers with newbies at starting salary -- I think that is very prevalent in Wisconsin, too; perhaps throughout the upper Midwest. I was told flat out that with my master's degree I would never find a position here; schools would simply consider me too expensive. It is very different in the Northeast, where experience is prized. The faculty at many Wisconsin high schools look like they are students in high school themselves.

Thank you very much for the continuing encouragement and useful links. I will keep you posted.
Could this focus on replacing experienced teachers with the younger newbie possibly contribute to the fact that the United States is not keeping up with so many other countries academically?

Good luck with getting a position!
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Old 02-08-2009, 04:20 PM
 
153 posts, read 294,158 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ragdoll Kitty Lover View Post
Could this focus on replacing experienced teachers with the younger newbie possibly contribute to the fact that the United States is not keeping up with so many other countries academically?

Good luck with getting a position!
Sure. And higher education is even worse on the labor side -- constantly replacing well-paid tenure-track faculty with dirt-cheap benefit-less adjuncts. In that case we are talking about equivalently talented people in both categories, but the few tenure-track faculty have a future and the many adjuncts don't (which means that they will wash out of the profession). Higher education, for all its supposed sensitivity to social responsibility, actually constitutes one of the most brutally exploitive labor markets out there.
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