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Old 02-17-2009, 08:13 AM
 
Location: The Queen City
444 posts, read 1,027,860 times
Reputation: 173

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
One has to ask what the relationship in North Carolina is between education level and degree of difficulty in finding work. Are those relocating with specific marketable skills and higher education having the same difficulty as those who have minimal education? Is the North Carolina dropout rate coming home to roost? Are transplants having an easier way to go then natives? Are there regional differences? Does this thread have greater accuracy in the Charlotte thread? Lots of questions and not seeing much in the way of answers.
How does the education and income average for transplants and natives compare? What is a native and how long do you need to live here to be one. Is it only folks who are born here? Would that make natives on average older than transplants? Is the average age of those who have relocated similar to natives? How does the appropriate data between the two compare.

.
Last sememster I had a freaking N.C. racist translpant for a teacher!!!
I'd rather it be a Hispanic. At least they are nicer!!!!!
Hope that answers your pondering.
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Old 02-17-2009, 09:47 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,059,012 times
Reputation: 22371
Quote:
Originally Posted by nchomewardbound View Post
hmmm what about people who are from NC and still have family in NC they're trying to get back to? Are they considered "outsiders" too?
Once again . . . it seems these discussions turn to "outsiders vs. natives." Any place you move, you are the newcomer, LOL, and NC is no different.

In Charlotte, for ex., the population is over 60% newcomers. So newcomers are in the majority here.

My friends from NJ and NY tell me they have rarely even MET a native and in their subdivisions, are surrounded w/ other newcomers from NJ and NY. Sure, there are natives here, but in many areas w/ high rates of in-migration from other states . . . natives are severely outnumbered.

No matter where you are from, you will find more people here who moved from that area. And if you have family, you will also have immediate connections, so moving here and establishing a new social life and support system is just not a big problem for most people.
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Old 02-17-2009, 10:03 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,059,012 times
Reputation: 22371
Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
One has to ask what the relationship in North Carolina is between education level and degree of difficulty in finding work. Are those relocating with specific marketable skills and higher education having the same difficulty as those who have minimal education? Is the North Carolina dropout rate coming home to roost? Are transplants having an easier way to go then natives? Are there regional differences? Does this thread have greater accuracy in the Charlotte thread? Lots of questions and not seeing much in the way of answers.
How does the education and income average for transplants and natives compare? What is a native and how long do you need to live here to be one. Is it only folks who are born here? Would that make natives on average older than transplants? Is the average age of those who have relocated similar to natives? How does the appropriate data between the two compare.

I am a recent transplant and yes it is sunny all of the time and the weather is so much better. My transplant neighbors seem to be enjoying the good life also. Maybe the industries transplants came for are doing better then the jobs natives inherited. Everytime I shop at Whole Foods it seems like we see lots of happy people. Trader Joe's seems like a happy place etc etc.
I always find this discussion interesting, as my friends and family (natives) all have college degrees and most have advanced degrees (many have doctorates). It was expected that people would seek higher education when I was growing up.

All you have to do is look at NC's traditions w/ colleges and universities! Do you think these institutions were floundering until out of state students started showing up? Not hardly! We have more colleges and universities than most other states and many of them were founded in the 19th Century.

This is a fallacy about "uneducated NC residents." Yes, we have a high drop out rate, but not when one examines the demographics of the dropouts. Those stay very consistent throughout the country (i.e. poverty level, racial makeup, parents' education, etc).

Please understand that we had banking here b/f the expansions and hiring boom in Charlotte, for ex. And those were home-grown banks, wh/ have now been more or less destroyed/reconfigured . . . but not while they were large hometown banks!!! So we had plenty of qualified people situated in the financial district b/f BofA and Wachovia gobbled up other entities and grew.

As for the Raleigh region . . . and biotech . . . I believe if you look at the history of the area, you will see those first industries were basically home-grown, as well. I have a cousin who was one of the people (w/ a doctorate) who started a successful biotech company in that region . . . so . . . I find the suggestion that NC is full of uneducated people who could not "do the jobs" that newcomers could perform as being rather specious.

Carolina, Wake, Duke have been turning out docs and other healthcare professionals who were natives for decades . . . NC State has been turning out engineers . . . residents of NC never had to pay out of state tuition to ensure their kids got quality college degrees.

Long before the Northern Migration to NC began in the late 90s and early 2000s, NC had more college campuses than most states - and were turning out grads who preferred to stay right here at home.

The latest stats show that 74% of NC residents have chosen to STAY HERE. The only other state that exceeds that amount of natives who CHOOSE TO STAY is Texas. What does that tell you? They found jobs here so they COULD stay.
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Old 02-17-2009, 10:38 AM
 
147 posts, read 413,170 times
Reputation: 306
It is natural for someone who is moving or relatively new to a place to traffic in positive magical thinking. There is always the honeymoon faze. POV is so important. One generally finds what they are looking for at least for a while. Most of the new transplants have cashed in and have a higher quality of life due to cheaper housing, expanding opportunities (perceived or real), and the excitement of discovering new things.

This naturally lasts for a while. On these boards much of the language describing people's upcoming move or recent move consists of emotional descriptives like "fell in love" etc. Time will tell. Over development and contracting opportunity in NC are going to hit newcomers hard. Look to late 80's recession as a model. When the honeymoon matures into reality, as it has started to for many in the triangle, it will be interesting to see how many are truly committed to their new home.

I have read in amazement at the number of builders and new developments in NC that have slid or are sliding into bankruptcy. I hope it doesn't turn bad, but I wonder how many of these people who live in these developments where no one has been there longer than three years will stay if things start getting bad. A few families leave, comps go down, others start to bail and a panic starts which creates a reverse momentum similar to the kind that brought people from LI and NJ. Sounds like what has happened and is happening in other rapid growth areas around the country.
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Old 02-17-2009, 10:53 AM
 
6,196 posts, read 14,214,969 times
Reputation: 4483
This area has a LOT of unemployed highly educated residents. They are now applying in droves for entry-level, hourly jobs that require no education beyond a high school degree. That is the REALITY. For example: Mall stores and grocery stores are getting HUNDREDS of resumes, more than they can handle. People with bachelor's and master's degrees are applying.

Once again: North Carolina has the eighth highest unemployment rate in the nation.

We're not Mayberry down here. We're not country bumpkins. We are educated. There have been transplants for multiple decades, and they are educated as well and are out of work.

Keep asking and hoping, and the answer will be the same: North Carolina is NOT the answer to your unemployment prayers. (Not at this time, and most likely not in the foreseeable future.)
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Old 02-17-2009, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Charlotte
2,447 posts, read 6,646,872 times
Reputation: 1389
Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
One has to ask what the relationship in North Carolina is between education level and degree of difficulty in finding work. Are those relocating with specific marketable skills and higher education having the same difficulty as those who have minimal education? Is the North Carolina dropout rate coming home to roost? Are transplants having an easier way to go then natives? Are there regional differences? Does this thread have greater accuracy in the Charlotte thread? Lots of questions and not seeing much in the way of answers.
How does the education and income average for transplants and natives compare? What is a native and how long do you need to live here to be one. Is it only folks who are born here? Would that make natives on average older than transplants? Is the average age of those who have relocated similar to natives? How does the appropriate data between the two compare.

I am a recent transplant and yes it is sunny all of the time and the weather is so much better. My transplant neighbors seem to be enjoying the good life also. Maybe the industries transplants came for are doing better then the jobs natives inherited. Everytime I shop at Whole Foods it seems like we see lots of happy people. Trader Joe's seems like a happy place etc etc.
Deepening job losses drag down college-educated (http://www.newsobserver.com/100/story/1397969.html - broken link)

Quote:
College-educated workers in the Triangle have been hit hard as information technology jobs have been cut at major employers such as IBM and Nortel. Nor were researchers and scientists spared when GlaxoSmithKline trimmed its payroll last year. Charlotte, too, has been hit as the banking industry's woes have led to high-level job cuts and layoffs at businesses that serve the banks, such as law firms, local employment experts say. The Triangle's unemployment rate was 7 percent in December; the Charlotte area's was 8.9 percent.

Both areas have higher concentrations of educated workers than the nation as a whole. In the Triangle, nearly 87 percent of residents have a high school degree or higher, census data show, compared with 84 percent nationwide. And nearly 40 percent have a bachelor's degree or higher, compared with 27 percent nationwide.
Economists attribute the recent rise in higher-level job loss to the financial services meltdown, layoffs in the technology sector and the overall economy.

"Lately, there's just been a lot of job cuts across the board," said Matthew Dotson, an economist with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
The unemployment rate for college graduates has been as low as 1.7 percent and hovers, on average, around 2.2 percent to 2.5 percent, he said. In the last downturn, this decade, the rate peaked at 3.2 percent.
"This just shows the pervasiveness of the recession," said Mike Walden, an economist at N.C. State University.
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Old 02-17-2009, 12:01 PM
 
Location: in a house
3,574 posts, read 13,102,039 times
Reputation: 2341
Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
.....Long before the Northern Migration to NC began in the late 90s and early 2000s, NC had more college campuses than most states - and were turning out grads who preferred to stay right here at home.
The latest stats show that 74% of NC residents have chosen to STAY HERE. The only other state that exceeds that amount of natives who CHOOSE TO STAY is Texas. What does that tell you? They found jobs here so they COULD stay.
Now, Ani, you know that the reason people cannot find work/get interview/etc before they get here (if they even try) is because of their out-of-state address, not because we actually have (gasp) college graduates or other qualified people who might also be in line for the position!!!!!
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Old 02-17-2009, 12:16 PM
 
Location: The Queen City
444 posts, read 1,027,860 times
Reputation: 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovebrentwood View Post
This area has a LOT of unemployed highly educated residents. They are now applying in droves for entry-level, hourly jobs that require no education beyond a high school degree. That is the REALITY. For example: Mall stores and grocery stores are getting HUNDREDS of resumes, more than they can handle. People with bachelor's and master's degrees are applying.

Once again: North Carolina has the eighth highest unemployment rate in the nation.

We're not Mayberry down here. We're not country bumpkins. We are educated. There have been transplants for multiple decades, and they are educated as well and are out of work.

Keep asking and hoping, and the answer will be the same: North Carolina is NOT the answer to your unemployment prayers. (Not at this time, and most likely not in the foreseeable future.)
HECK YEA natives are educated and NORMAL people.
If people moved to these desolate areas (Salisbury, etc,etc...) there would be more jobs for more people.
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Old 02-17-2009, 01:45 PM
 
29,749 posts, read 34,791,238 times
Reputation: 11636
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raivere View Post
Last sememster I had a freaking N.C. racist translpant for a teacher!!!
I'd rather it be a Hispanic. At least they are nicer!!!!!
Hope that answers your pondering.
One anecdotal story does not a data base make. No it doesn't answer anything other then did you ever have a teacher you didn't like.
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Old 02-17-2009, 01:47 PM
 
29,749 posts, read 34,791,238 times
Reputation: 11636
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raivere View Post
HECK YEA natives are educated and NORMAL people.
If people moved to these desolate areas (Salisbury, etc,etc...) there would be more jobs for more people.
Does Salisbury have a booming market? Is Catawba one of the leading North Carolina Uniiversities? Is Catawba a mecca for graduate school technology training?
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