U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-20-2009, 04:57 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
13,732 posts, read 22,616,419 times
Reputation: 14199

Advertisements

[quote=doctorjef;8878045]I didn't want to use that part of VA as a basis for comparison. But the erroneous part may have been sort of saying "Please compare Old Virginia with Modern NC" and hoping to be reassured that Modern NC is a helluva lot more progressive.[quote]

The short answer to that question is: Yes. And, as a metro, the Triangle is going to be your best bet for progressives on a large scale in NC.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-13-2015, 08:37 AM
 
2,824 posts, read 4,167,504 times
Reputation: 1775
NC is a bit more "good ol' boy" with red soil. I feel like we also have more longleaf pines down here, and we're more hung up over our southern cuisine (biscuits, super salty NC ham, BBQ, sweet tea, etc.). We have more tobacco, and we're slowly becoming a little more suburban as our major metros continue to grow. I'm still baffled to see apartment complexes popping up off I-85/I-40 in towns like Mebane. We're a little less historic, but obviously still take pride in what we have like The Lost Colony, Wright Bros, Biltmore Estate, Great Smoky Mountains, etc.

VA is less redneck and more so "sophisticated southern." The state had more English settlers especially closer to the Chesapeake, while NC received tons of Scots-Irish settlers. VA was wealthier for a longer period of time, with many plantations in the Tidewater region/along the James River. NC was more remote and poor, minus a few Eastern NC pockets. VA cities are much more historic, just look at Richmond alongside Raleigh. It's also interesting how Northern VA is constantly seen as a different state almost, or "out of the South." We don't really have that problem down here although the Research Triangle in particular is constantly seen as "less southern" as time goes by.

Today, honestly both states aren't that different. I can cruise around Richmond suburbs and think I'm in North Raleigh, for example. Historically, they're definitely more different.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2022, 10:08 PM
 
4,261 posts, read 5,671,489 times
Reputation: 3857
Well-stated Jay
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2022, 10:41 AM
 
139 posts, read 41,809 times
Reputation: 280
Eastern NC is closer to the deep South than the rest of the state imo. Feels more like traditional NC. Piedmont region is being consumed and destroyed by transplants with liberal politics. Appalachian regions seem to be a bit a both.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2022, 01:05 PM
 
4,261 posts, read 5,671,489 times
Reputation: 3857
Quote:
Originally Posted by hustler5874 View Post
Eastern NC is closer to the deep South than the rest of the state imo. Feels more like traditional NC. Piedmont region is being consumed and destroyed by transplants with liberal politics. Appalachian regions seem to be a bit a both.
I heartily welcome all progressives to my home state, and adore all native Tar Heel progressives, who are amongst the world’s finest people.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2022, 04:48 PM
 
745 posts, read 460,534 times
Reputation: 1126
The rural Piedmont is just as conservative as the mountains. Counties like Yadkin and Randolph are about as red as you can get in North Carolina. Even the cities are more purple rather than hardcore blue, except for the Chapel Hill area and Durham.

Anyway, to answer the question, any differences between the two states are subtle or they tie back to history. Virginia has a richer history, especially during the 1700s. Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Henry, etc. All were Virginians. North Carolina, before the Civil War, was the most rural and backward southern state. The biggest reason why is that North Carolina lacked a good seaport, stunting growth and development. Virginia had one at Norfolk, same for South Carolina at Charleston.

"Southside" Virginia is the area in Virginia that is the most similar to North Carolina. It's a rural region, but it relied on tobacco, textiles, and furniture manufacturing akin to North Carolina. Towns like Danville, South Boston, Farmville, Martinsville, and Galax (further west). In North Carolina, the northeastern corner of the state is the most similar to Virginia. Most of the Outer Banks, Elizabeth City, Edenton, Murfreesboro, as far west as Roanoke Rapids. This area is a lot closer to Norfolk than it is to Raleigh. Just my opinion, though!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2022, 08:57 AM
LLN
 
Location: Upstairs closet
5,250 posts, read 10,146,731 times
Reputation: 7139
The biggest challenge to the early development of NC were the treacherous waters outside the various rivers/inlets. Like stated earlier, both VA and SC had good ports (due to much safer approaches). The area off our coast is not called Graveyard of the Atlantic for nothing.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2022, 06:05 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
3,539 posts, read 3,495,259 times
Reputation: 4002
Quote:
Originally Posted by hustler5874 View Post
Eastern NC is closer to the deep South than the rest of the state imo. Feels more like traditional NC. Piedmont region is being consumed and destroyed by transplants with liberal politics. Appalachian regions seem to be a bit a both.
I feel that the Western half of NC is influenced a tad more by the Appalachia mountain past, more into country arts and crafts, folk music, etc. Charlotte is somewhat part of this too in my opinion from what I see when visiting.

Eastern NC is influenced by the ocean, tourist industry, fishing and farming, poultry and hog industries.

There is more colonial history in the East, and it seems less 'Deep South" to me, but definitely "small town South" for sure.

There are a lot of dying small towns in Eastern NC, mainly due to migration to job centers like the Triangle, but also from less farming altogether. It's a large area, and every old town can't be prosperous forever.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2022, 06:14 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
3,539 posts, read 3,495,259 times
Reputation: 4002
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
NC is a bit more "good ol' boy" with red soil. I feel like we also have more longleaf pines down here, and we're more hung up over our southern cuisine (biscuits, super salty NC ham, BBQ, sweet tea, etc.). We have more tobacco, and we're slowly becoming a little more suburban as our major metros continue to grow. I'm still baffled to see apartment complexes popping up off I-85/I-40 in towns like Mebane. We're a little less historic, but obviously still take pride in what we have like The Lost Colony, Wright Bros, Biltmore Estate, Great Smoky Mountains, etc.

VA is less redneck and more so "sophisticated southern." The state had more English settlers especially closer to the Chesapeake, while NC received tons of Scots-Irish settlers. VA was wealthier for a longer period of time, with many plantations in the Tidewater region/along the James River. NC was more remote and poor, minus a few Eastern NC pockets. VA cities are much more historic, just look at Richmond alongside Raleigh. It's also interesting how Northern VA is constantly seen as a different state almost, or "out of the South." We don't really have that problem down here although the Research Triangle in particular is constantly seen as "less southern" as time goes by.

Today, honestly both states aren't that different. I can cruise around Richmond suburbs and think I'm in North Raleigh, for example. Historically, they're definitely more different.
I agree. When my cousin's daughter got married several years ago on the Outer Banks, They and all the guests were from the VA Tidewater area, and there were no rednecks or pretentious wealthy types in attendance. With about 150 guests, it was a laid back, Southern upper middle class crowd that drank but held their liquor well.

The men mostly wore loafers without socks. That's very descriptive to what you mentioned above.

But again, VA's population is concentrated to 3 main areas, and NC is the powerhouse state comprised of hundreds of small towns. Very different DNA.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2022, 07:39 AM
 
745 posts, read 460,534 times
Reputation: 1126
What strikes me about Virginia is how rural it can be in certain areas. Granted, there are a few very rural pockets in North Carolina, but I’ve driven in parts of Southside Virginia (less than two hours north of Raleigh) that felt extremely isolated. Lots of counties off the beaten path, with no major interstate and very few towns. It’s almost like there was a big drop off from Virginia’s cities (Richmond, Norfolk, etc.) to rural Virginia and not much in the middle, historically. In other words, Virginia had larger cities than North Carolina back in the old days, but rural Virginia remained more isolated than rural North Carolina.

North Carolina’s population is more spread out. It really is a state of large-ish towns and midsized cities. It’s hard to drive an hour in any direction without hitting a town that is at least the size of Rocky Mount, Burlington, Statesville, etc. I’ve never felt completely isolated in North Carolina, there’s always a fairly large town nearby in most areas. There are a few exceptions like deep in the mountains past Asheville, closer to the Outer Banks, and a handful of counties such as Warren, though.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:




Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2023, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top