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View Poll Results: which city and why? what does the other city need to do to get your vote?
Raleigh-Durham 195 43.43%
Charlotte 254 56.57%
Voters: 449. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 04-22-2011, 08:07 AM
 
971 posts, read 506,273 times
Reputation: 955
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancharlotte View Post
Well, I am all for Gateway Station getting funds, but I still have doubts about this "faster" train to Raleigh. I just don't think the improvements will be good enough to change the current 1,000 people per day ridership much.

I think Gateway station (on the Charlotte side at least) will change ridership alone.
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Old 05-03-2011, 10:05 PM
 
4,400 posts, read 4,464,501 times
Reputation: 1064
I've recently read an article by McKinsey concerning the Global 600 cities, really MSAs, which will be contributing the bulk of the economic growth of the future. This study focused on different models that described the global future up until 2025. Interesting enough, NC has 4 cities in the Global 600: Charlotte, Raleigh, Greensboro, and Durham. I say kudos to NC for contributing 4 cities that have such a global impact.

Once again, I want to bring attention to Charlotte and Raleigh-Durham. These areas are definitely propelling NC some major heights. This is not to ignore Greensboro, but Charlotte and Raleigh-Durham will have a higher impact. NC should definitely do what it takes to continue to allow both metros to flourish so that these areas can add to NCs economic, political, and social clout.
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Old 05-04-2011, 09:58 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
7,743 posts, read 8,804,108 times
Reputation: 5682
Quote:
Originally Posted by prwfromnc View Post
I totally agree with you about the leadership in Charlotte and Raleigh city being progressive, my problem @ times are with some of our state leaders who still want to run things like this is still Mayberry!
Just wait until redistricting, we might really be in for some old school Mayberry.
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Old 05-05-2011, 07:02 PM
 
882 posts, read 1,318,732 times
Reputation: 454
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
Just wait until redistricting, we might really be in for some old school Mayberry.
I agree. Raleigh is in trouble. The middle of the road Mayberry attitude will destroy this city eventually, if we don't start thinking on a larger scale.... Charlotte may be in a rough spot now (temporary), but Charlotte will truly be a city to be reckoned with in the future.
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Old 05-05-2011, 07:34 PM
 
971 posts, read 506,273 times
Reputation: 955
Quote:
Originally Posted by metro.m View Post
I agree. Raleigh is in trouble. The middle of the road Mayberry attitude will destroy this city eventually, if we don't start thinking on a larger scale.... Charlotte may be in a rough spot now (temporary), but Charlotte will truly be a city to be reckoned with in the future.

Care to give a small little explanation? I'm not following you guys about redistricting and mayberry.
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Old 05-05-2011, 11:24 PM
 
4,400 posts, read 4,464,501 times
Reputation: 1064
Quote:
Originally Posted by metro.m View Post
I agree. Raleigh is in trouble. The middle of the road Mayberry attitude will destroy this city eventually, if we don't start thinking on a larger scale.... Charlotte may be in a rough spot now (temporary), but Charlotte will truly be a city to be reckoned with in the future.
I am also curious about what you're referring to. I'm kind of shocked to see Raleigh could be in the position to be in trouble. I do understand that the recent acquisition of Progress Energy and possibly RBC Bank may seem alarming, but there is still RTP. Not to mention the great universities of the area. I'm curious about this redistricting debauchle.

At any rate, Charlotte had to fight hard for this success. Most of it came by some of "Old Charlotte" finally giving way to a younger more progressive crowd. Now the problem is balancing the progressive with pro-business.
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Old 05-06-2011, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Sherrills Ford, NC
72 posts, read 80,252 times
Reputation: 188
Raleigh and Charlotte are both going to be great 21st Century American cities. East Coast, good access to beaches and mountains, warm climate, educated workforce, younger population compared to many other cities.

Each city may have some bumps along the way, but the positive momentum each city has built over the last 20 years is not going away, even if it slows down.

As someone pointed out, Raleigh and the Triangle will always have RTP, which is continuing to become one of the most nationally renowned research parks as well as being well-known internationally. Also, Raleigh is the state capitol of a rapidly-growing state. Even though the recession will lead to job cuts in the short-term, long-term Raleigh is in a very good situation. As in one of the best in the entire country.

Charlotte is always going to be a little more boom or bust (like most major non-capitol cities). Of course you have the cities like New York, Philly, LA, Houston, Dallas/Fort Worth that have reached Alpha or Beta city status on an international scale that really exist outside of regional or even national influences. Charlotte is a long way off from that level, but Charlotte is becoming a semi-major national player.

Charlotte was recently ranked the 25th best market in terms of economic output for the whole country. Charlotte has reached a critical mass in terms of being a major player nationally in terms of being a major financial center. Charlotte is taking major steps towards becoming a major energy center.

Charlotte will always be more dependent on big business than Raleigh. Charlotte historically has trended ahead of Raleigh in terms of growth when the economy was booming and behind when the economy in down. However, Raleigh and the Triangle have reached a point though where I think growth there will be comparable to Charlotte even in a good economy and better in a down economy like now.

Both the Greater Charlotte area and the Triangle added comparable growth numbers overall over the past 10 years. This led to a higher percentage for the Triangle b/c there were less people there to start. Raleigh did outpace every other city in NC, though, well above in percentage and even slightly more than Charlotte in terms of pure number growth.

Check out these figures below:

Top ten in growth in 1,000,000 plus metros from 2000-2010

1. Las Vegas, NV 41.8%
2. Raleigh, NC 41.8 (squeaks in a 1.130 mill today from 800k in 2000)
3. Austin, TX 37.3
4 Charlotte-Gastonia, NC/SC 32.1
5. Riverside, Ca 29.8
6 Orlando, FL 29.8
7. Phoenix, Az 28.9
8. Houston Tx 26.1
9. San Antonio Tx. 25.2
10. Atlanta, GA. 24.0


Growth of North Carolina’s Cities from 2000–2010:
  • Charlotte: 35.2 percent to 731,424
  • Raleigh: 46.3 percent to 403,892
Growth of North Carolina Counties from 2000–2010:
  • Mecklenburg County: 32.2 percent to 919,628
  • Wake County: 43.5 percent to 900,993
Pretty impressive indeed!! Outside of the 4 Big Texas Cities (SA, Austin, Dallas, Houston), I can't think of any other state that has more than 1 area that has experienced such impressive growth as have Raleigh and Charlotte in NC. Proud to call this state home!
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Old 05-06-2011, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Massachusetts
4,209 posts, read 5,870,382 times
Reputation: 3644
Quote:
Originally Posted by joethoma View Post
Raleigh and Charlotte are both going to be great 21st Century American cities. East Coast, good access to beaches and mountains, warm climate, educated workforce, younger population compared to many other cities.

Each city may have some bumps along the way, but the positive momentum each city has built over the last 20 years is not going away, even if it slows down.

As someone pointed out, Raleigh and the Triangle will always have RTP, which is continuing to become one of the most nationally renowned research parks as well as being well-known internationally. Also, Raleigh is the state capitol of a rapidly-growing state. Even though the recession will lead to job cuts in the short-term, long-term Raleigh is in a very good situation. As in one of the best in the entire country.

Charlotte is always going to be a little more boom or bust (like most major non-capitol cities). Of course you have the cities like New York, Philly, LA, Houston, Dallas/Fort Worth that have reached Alpha or Beta city status on an international scale that really exist outside of regional or even national influences. Charlotte is a long way off from that level, but Charlotte is becoming a semi-major national player.

Charlotte was recently ranked the 25th best market in terms of economic output for the whole country. Charlotte has reached a critical mass in terms of being a major player nationally in terms of being a major financial center. Charlotte is taking major steps towards becoming a major energy center.

Charlotte will always be more dependent on big business than Raleigh. Charlotte historically has trended ahead of Raleigh in terms of growth when the economy was booming and behind when the economy in down. However, Raleigh and the Triangle have reached a point though where I think growth there will be comparable to Charlotte even in a good economy and better in a down economy like now.

Both the Greater Charlotte area and the Triangle added comparable growth numbers overall over the past 10 years. This led to a higher percentage for the Triangle b/c there were less people there to start. Raleigh did outpace every other city in NC, though, well above in percentage and even slightly more than Charlotte in terms of pure number growth.

Check out these figures below:

Top ten in growth in 1,000,000 plus metros from 2000-2010

1. Las Vegas, NV 41.8%
2. Raleigh, NC 41.8 (squeaks in a 1.130 mill today from 800k in 2000)
3. Austin, TX 37.3
4 Charlotte-Gastonia, NC/SC 32.1
5. Riverside, Ca 29.8
6 Orlando, FL 29.8
7. Phoenix, Az 28.9
8. Houston Tx 26.1
9. San Antonio Tx. 25.2
10. Atlanta, GA. 24.0



Growth of North Carolina’s Cities from 2000–2010:
  • Charlotte: 35.2 percent to 731,424
  • Raleigh: 46.3 percent to 403,892
Growth of North Carolina Counties from 2000–2010:
  • Mecklenburg County: 32.2 percent to 919,628
  • Wake County: 43.5 percent to 900,993
Pretty impressive indeed!! Outside of the 4 Big Texas Cities (SA, Austin, Dallas, Houston), I can't think of any other state that has more than 1 area that has experienced such impressive growth as have Raleigh and Charlotte in NC. Proud to call this state home!

Im glad your proud of NC and its cities/Metro's and I sincerly mean that.

I do however have this question from reading your descriptions. Are the economies and the lifestyles diversified enough, to attrack a broad range of peoples, backrounds, ages to the areas. Or are/ will the areas be dominated mainly by one dominant population. If so that may be progressive on the economic spectrum of things. However not so much for those, that don't meet the description of its regional populations.
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Old 05-06-2011, 10:16 AM
 
116 posts, read 93,253 times
Reputation: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by joethoma View Post
Raleigh and Charlotte are both going to be great 21st Century American cities. East Coast, good access to beaches and mountains, warm climate, educated workforce, younger population compared to many other cities.

Each city may have some bumps along the way, but the positive momentum each city has built over the last 20 years is not going away, even if it slows down.

As someone pointed out, Raleigh and the Triangle will always have RTP, which is continuing to become one of the most nationally renowned research parks as well as being well-known internationally. Also, Raleigh is the state capitol of a rapidly-growing state. Even though the recession will lead to job cuts in the short-term, long-term Raleigh is in a very good situation. As in one of the best in the entire country.

Charlotte is always going to be a little more boom or bust (like most major non-capitol cities). Of course you have the cities like New York, Philly, LA, Houston, Dallas/Fort Worth that have reached Alpha or Beta city status on an international scale that really exist outside of regional or even national influences. Charlotte is a long way off from that level, but Charlotte is becoming a semi-major national player.

Charlotte was recently ranked the 25th best market in terms of economic output for the whole country. Charlotte has reached a critical mass in terms of being a major player nationally in terms of being a major financial center. Charlotte is taking major steps towards becoming a major energy center.

Charlotte will always be more dependent on big business than Raleigh. Charlotte historically has trended ahead of Raleigh in terms of growth when the economy was booming and behind when the economy in down. However, Raleigh and the Triangle have reached a point though where I think growth there will be comparable to Charlotte even in a good economy and better in a down economy like now.

Both the Greater Charlotte area and the Triangle added comparable growth numbers overall over the past 10 years. This led to a higher percentage for the Triangle b/c there were less people there to start. Raleigh did outpace every other city in NC, though, well above in percentage and even slightly more than Charlotte in terms of pure number growth.

Check out these figures below:

Top ten in growth in 1,000,000 plus metros from 2000-2010

1. Las Vegas, NV 41.8%
2. Raleigh, NC 41.8 (squeaks in a 1.130 mill today from 800k in 2000)
3. Austin, TX 37.3
4 Charlotte-Gastonia, NC/SC 32.1
5. Riverside, Ca 29.8
6 Orlando, FL 29.8
7. Phoenix, Az 28.9
8. Houston Tx 26.1
9. San Antonio Tx. 25.2
10. Atlanta, GA. 24.0



Growth of North Carolina’s Cities from 2000–2010:
  • Charlotte: 35.2 percent to 731,424
  • Raleigh: 46.3 percent to 403,892
Growth of North Carolina Counties from 2000–2010:
  • Mecklenburg County: 32.2 percent to 919,628
  • Wake County: 43.5 percent to 900,993
Pretty impressive indeed!! Outside of the 4 Big Texas Cities (SA, Austin, Dallas, Houston), I can't think of any other state that has more than 1 area that has experienced such impressive growth as have Raleigh and Charlotte in NC. Proud to call this state home!
That is true, I believe Raleigh will be just fine, and overall I think both cities growth will be comparable. However, big business dependence can be an asset as well as a problem. Look at New York (i'm not comparing Charlotte to NY but bear with me), big business is what truly runs this country, politicians are just puppets to businessman. Charlotte being recognised as a major financial center, and hopefully diversifying it's economy, puts it in a good spot that most cities it's size would envy. Of course the economy is boom and bust, so that can either hurt or help Charlotte short term, but like you said, overall they will probably see similar growth patterns overall, whether that's positive or negative, I don't think Raleigh is any more shielded from what's going on nationally, Raleigh is just as vulnerable, that's why it would benefit both cities to cooperate rather than compete, otherwise I believe Charlotte would become to NC what ATL is to GA, or Raleigh headed that way at the expense of Charlotte, either way it's not a good situation IMO.
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Old 05-07-2011, 03:52 AM
 
4,709 posts, read 4,875,749 times
Reputation: 2962
Here's an interesting story...

Bobcats, Canes may trade spaces | CharlotteObserver.com & The Charlotte Observer Newspaper (http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2011/05/06/2278736/bobcats-canes-may-trade-spaces.html - broken link)
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