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Old 08-26-2010, 04:42 PM
 
Location: Boone, NC
1,155 posts, read 3,152,870 times
Reputation: 282

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Quote:
Originally Posted by papabear5675 View Post
I called them back again and was told that the number of weeks doesn't matter. Its how much you were given in your initial claim. When asked when did I exhaust Tier1? Tier2? Tier3? Tier4? she said it doesn't matter and would not give us the answers. She also said that the federal extension meant that money was given to each state and each state makes their own laws on how claims are paid. When I asked again to please explain the 99 week maximum she asked where this "99" was coming from. There is a serious gap in answers, state laws, interpretation etc. but either way NC is screwing around with peoples lives but not having clear concise information. Any suggestions?

I also don't understand how I exhausted Tier1,2,3,and 4 from Jan.31 09 through 8/21/10. Can someone tell me if they have done the same? This really sucks.
I've written this time and again, but I'll say it once more. The duration of your unemployment depends entirely on work and earnings in the base period. Benefits are payable for UP TO 99 weeks, it's not just a guaranteed 99 weeks automatically. It's based on a formula, which in turn is based on how much you have earned in each quarter of the base period.

To determine the length of your regular UI benefits (not including extensions, just the initial, regular UI), you add up all the quarters of the base period, divide that sum by the high quarter, then multiply that sum by 8.66. If the result is less than 13 you get the minimum 13 weeks. If it's more than 26, you get just the maximum of 26 weeks. If it's somewhere in between, that's the number of weeks you get of regular UI.

Now, based on the number of weeks of regular UI, if you monetarily qualify for extensions, those extensions are a percentage of your original claim duration (the number arrived at in the formula above). So ONLY if you qualified for 26 weeks of regular UI may you qualify for the full number of weeks of extensions. If you qualified for less weeks of regular UI, then your number of weeks of extensions would be less. Here's a breakdown of how many weeks each extension is:

Tier 1 EUC - 80% of original claim duration
Tier 2 EUC - 50% of original claim duration (plus another partial week at the end of Tier 3)
Tier 3 EUC - 50% of original claim duration
Tier 4 EUC - UP TO 6 weeks of benefits, depending on the number of weeks of regular UI received
EB - 80% of original claim duration, IF you qualify for EB

So taking this into consideration, if someone qualified for 26 weeks of regular UI and then monetarily qualified for extensions, they would get 20 weeks of Tier 1 (80% of 26); 13 weeks of Tier 2 (50% of 26), plus one partial week; 13 weeks of Tier 3 (50% of 26), and 6 weeks of Tier 4 (maximum amount of Tier 4 since someone qualified for the maximum amount of regular UI). Then EB, if eligible, would be 20 weeks (80% of 26). Add all these together and you get the 99 weeks.

Now say that someone only qualified for 16 weeks of regular UI. Their Tier 1 EUC would be only 12 weeks (80% of 16); Tier 2 would be 8 weeks (50% of 16), plus a partial week; Tier 3 EUC would be 8 weeks (50% of 16) and Tier 4 would be 3-4 weeks since it's relative to the number of weeks of regular UI. EB, if eligible, would then be 12 weeks (80% of 16). Add all these up and you get 61 weeks.

See how things can vary? Just because someone you know, or someone who worked at the same place as you gets a certain amount of unemployment doesn't mean that's what you're going to get, unless your wages in the base period were identical.

As far as a rep not being able to tell you when you exhausted whatever tier, that's just laziness on their part I'm embarrassed to say. They can easily look at your claim and tell you what the date of your last tier payment (coded by a 16 on the screen) was. And it's easy to tell what tier it was - 01 is regular UI, E1 is Tier 1, G1 is Tier 2, I1 is Tier 3, K1 is Tier 4, 21 is EB. Takes a split second to do an evaluation, and maybe if you call someone again they will take the time to explain it. I wish they would do a better job of explaining so more folks weren't left wondering about their claim when they hung up.
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Old 08-26-2010, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Fayetteville NC
2 posts, read 2,802 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdljr View Post
I've written this time and again, but I'll say it once more. The duration of your unemployment depends entirely on work and earnings in the base period. Benefits are payable for UP TO 99 weeks, it's not just a guaranteed 99 weeks automatically. It's based on a formula, which in turn is based on how much you have earned in each quarter of the base period.

To determine the length of your regular UI benefits (not including extensions, just the initial, regular UI), you add up all the quarters of the base period, divide that sum by the high quarter, then multiply that sum by 8.66. If the result is less than 13 you get the minimum 13 weeks. If it's more than 26, you get just the maximum of 26 weeks. If it's somewhere in between, that's the number of weeks you get of regular UI.

Now, based on the number of weeks of regular UI, if you monetarily qualify for extensions, those extensions are a percentage of your original claim duration (the number arrived at in the formula above). So ONLY if you qualified for 26 weeks of regular UI may you qualify for the full number of weeks of extensions. If you qualified for less weeks of regular UI, then your number of weeks of extensions would be less. Here's a breakdown of how many weeks each extension is:

Tier 1 EUC - 80% of original claim duration
Tier 2 EUC - 50% of original claim duration (plus another partial week at the end of Tier 3)
Tier 3 EUC - 50% of original claim duration
Tier 4 EUC - UP TO 6 weeks of benefits, depending on the number of weeks of regular UI received
EB - 80% of original claim duration, IF you qualify for EB

So taking this into consideration, if someone qualified for 26 weeks of regular UI and then monetarily qualified for extensions, they would get 20 weeks of Tier 1 (80% of 26); 13 weeks of Tier 2 (50% of 26), plus one partial week; 13 weeks of Tier 3 (50% of 26), and 6 weeks of Tier 4 (maximum amount of Tier 4 since someone qualified for the maximum amount of regular UI). Then EB, if eligible, would be 20 weeks (80% of 26). Add all these together and you get the 99 weeks.

Now say that someone only qualified for 16 weeks of regular UI. Their Tier 1 EUC would be only 12 weeks (80% of 16); Tier 2 would be 8 weeks (50% of 16), plus a partial week; Tier 3 EUC would be 8 weeks (50% of 16) and Tier 4 would be 3-4 weeks since it's relative to the number of weeks of regular UI. EB, if eligible, would then be 12 weeks (80% of 16). Add all these up and you get 61 weeks.

See how things can vary? Just because someone you know, or someone who worked at the same place as you gets a certain amount of unemployment doesn't mean that's what you're going to get, unless your wages in the base period were identical.

As far as a rep not being able to tell you when you exhausted whatever tier, that's just laziness on their part I'm embarrassed to say. They can easily look at your claim and tell you what the date of your last tier payment (coded by a 16 on the screen) was. And it's easy to tell what tier it was - 01 is regular UI, E1 is Tier 1, G1 is Tier 2, I1 is Tier 3, K1 is Tier 4, 21 is EB. Takes a split second to do an evaluation, and maybe if you call someone again they will take the time to explain it. I wish they would do a better job of explaining so more folks weren't left wondering about their claim when they hung up.
ohhhhhhhhhhh now it makes more sense to me
Thank you, Thank you , Thank you
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Old 08-27-2010, 08:33 AM
 
3 posts, read 3,953 times
Reputation: 10
Default 2841

THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU. Now this makes sense. Too bad the claims reps aren't given this as a training/reference tool. Really appreciate you taking the time to break it down.
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Old 08-27-2010, 08:21 PM
 
6 posts, read 9,553 times
Reputation: 10
jdljr
Thank you for posting such a clear picture of the tiers, as it is confusing when you talk to someone in the office, and they give such vague answers. I just started my second year, and rec'd a letter that qualified for xxx sum, which divided out to 23 weeks. Not sure what tier that means I am in, but that seemed like an odd amount. Possibly it means I received the other 3 weeks at the end of the 1st benefit year? I am also working a part time minimum wage job for 10 or so hours a week just to help ends meet. While I report the income each week, it is not enough to reduce my benefit. My question: if I leave that part time job, will that affect my extended benefits?

Thanks in advance for any help you can provide.
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Old 08-27-2010, 10:22 PM
 
131 posts, read 210,059 times
Reputation: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdljr View Post
I've written this time and again, but I'll say it once more. The duration of your unemployment depends entirely on work and earnings in the base period. Benefits are payable for UP TO 99 weeks, it's not just a guaranteed 99 weeks automatically. It's based on a formula, which in turn is based on how much you have earned in each quarter of the base period.

To determine the length of your regular UI benefits (not including extensions, just the initial, regular UI), you add up all the quarters of the base period, divide that sum by the high quarter, then multiply that sum by 8.66. If the result is less than 13 you get the minimum 13 weeks. If it's more than 26, you get just the maximum of 26 weeks. If it's somewhere in between, that's the number of weeks you get of regular UI.

Now, based on the number of weeks of regular UI, if you monetarily qualify for extensions, those extensions are a percentage of your original claim duration (the number arrived at in the formula above). So ONLY if you qualified for 26 weeks of regular UI may you qualify for the full number of weeks of extensions. If you qualified for less weeks of regular UI, then your number of weeks of extensions would be less. Here's a breakdown of how many weeks each extension is:

Tier 1 EUC - 80% of original claim duration
Tier 2 EUC - 50% of original claim duration (plus another partial week at the end of Tier 3)
Tier 3 EUC - 50% of original claim duration
Tier 4 EUC - UP TO 6 weeks of benefits, depending on the number of weeks of regular UI received
EB - 80% of original claim duration, IF you qualify for EB

So taking this into consideration, if someone qualified for 26 weeks of regular UI and then monetarily qualified for extensions, they would get 20 weeks of Tier 1 (80% of 26); 13 weeks of Tier 2 (50% of 26), plus one partial week; 13 weeks of Tier 3 (50% of 26), and 6 weeks of Tier 4 (maximum amount of Tier 4 since someone qualified for the maximum amount of regular UI). Then EB, if eligible, would be 20 weeks (80% of 26). Add all these together and you get the 99 weeks.

Now say that someone only qualified for 16 weeks of regular UI. Their Tier 1 EUC would be only 12 weeks (80% of 16); Tier 2 would be 8 weeks (50% of 16), plus a partial week; Tier 3 EUC would be 8 weeks (50% of 16) and Tier 4 would be 3-4 weeks since it's relative to the number of weeks of regular UI. EB, if eligible, would then be 12 weeks (80% of 16). Add all these up and you get 61 weeks.

See how things can vary? Just because someone you know, or someone who worked at the same place as you gets a certain amount of unemployment doesn't mean that's what you're going to get, unless your wages in the base period were identical.

As far as a rep not being able to tell you when you exhausted whatever tier, that's just laziness on their part I'm embarrassed to say. They can easily look at your claim and tell you what the date of your last tier payment (coded by a 16 on the screen) was. And it's easy to tell what tier it was - 01 is regular UI, E1 is Tier 1, G1 is Tier 2, I1 is Tier 3, K1 is Tier 4, 21 is EB. Takes a split second to do an evaluation, and maybe if you call someone again they will take the time to explain it. I wish they would do a better job of explaining so more folks weren't left wondering about their claim when they hung up.
As you can see folks, jdljr's presence on this thread is absolutely priceless! I have to say, if I was an ESC Rep, trying to explain what he has so meticulously and accurately laid out here, to umpteen people a day...well, I'm a patient person, but this just HAS to get old, even if it's your job. The rep I would always get on the phone & in person was nice enough, but extremely stressed, and often asked me to just "trust her" instead of explaining anything. Well, altho I'm sure she meant well, she was wrong several times. JDLJR is the only Rep I've known to be consistently accurate, knowledgable, patient & informative. I don't know what many of us would have done without his counsel & I just can't give him enough KUDOS!

BTW-I think I may have landed a part time job...will know next Wednesday--YAY!
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Old 08-28-2010, 07:18 AM
 
656 posts, read 1,024,530 times
Reputation: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by deerest View Post
As you can see folks, jdljr's presence on this thread is absolutely priceless! I have to say, if I was an ESC Rep, trying to explain what he has so meticulously and accurately laid out here, to umpteen people a day...well, I'm a patient person, but this just HAS to get old, even if it's your job. The rep I would always get on the phone & in person was nice enough, but extremely stressed, and often asked me to just "trust her" instead of explaining anything. Well, altho I'm sure she meant well, she was wrong several times. JDLJR is the only Rep I've known to be consistently accurate, knowledgable, patient & informative. I don't know what many of us would have done without his counsel & I just can't give him enough KUDOS!

BTW-I think I may have landed a part time job...will know next Wednesday--YAY!
Congrats Deerest!
That's awesome!!!!
Keep updates coming
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Old 08-28-2010, 06:25 PM
 
Location: Boone, NC
1,155 posts, read 3,152,870 times
Reputation: 282
Quote:
Originally Posted by esjh View Post
jdljr
Thank you for posting such a clear picture of the tiers, as it is confusing when you talk to someone in the office, and they give such vague answers. I just started my second year, and rec'd a letter that qualified for xxx sum, which divided out to 23 weeks. Not sure what tier that means I am in, but that seemed like an odd amount. Possibly it means I received the other 3 weeks at the end of the 1st benefit year? I am also working a part time minimum wage job for 10 or so hours a week just to help ends meet. While I report the income each week, it is not enough to reduce my benefit. My question: if I leave that part time job, will that affect my extended benefits?

Thanks in advance for any help you can provide.
It potentially could affect your claim, yes. I'll have to check. To give you an idea of how strict things can be, just yesterday I put some paperwork together to submit to Raleigh for someone who had refused a job. This person, who has been on UI since May 2009, was offered a temporary position in their line of work (painter) lasting just 1-2 weeks. It paid $12 per hour but the gentleman refused it because he said he "made $12 per hour 20 years ago". His last job he was a painting foreman and made $19 per hour. On his application for this position, he stated that he had "48 years experience painting all phases".

I reminded him that it was just a 1-2 week job, that at the end of the 1-2 weeks he could begin his UI claim again. I also reminded him that the $12 per hour equated out to far more than his $295 weekly benefit amount. He again refused the position even though I told him the refusal could stop his claim. He said he'd "take that risk". So I set the work refusal issue and will fax it to Raleigh Monday for them to adjudicate it. In the meantime and until they adjudicate it, his claim is stopped. He may have cost himself his entire remaining claim by refusing this temporary position. Or, he may not have. He refused suitable work. However, it was only temporary, so not sure how Raleigh will rule.

Last edited by jdljr; 08-28-2010 at 06:34 PM..
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Old 08-28-2010, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Boone, NC
1,155 posts, read 3,152,870 times
Reputation: 282
Quote:
Originally Posted by deerest View Post
As you can see folks, jdljr's presence on this thread is absolutely priceless! I have to say, if I was an ESC Rep, trying to explain what he has so meticulously and accurately laid out here, to umpteen people a day...well, I'm a patient person, but this just HAS to get old, even if it's your job. The rep I would always get on the phone & in person was nice enough, but extremely stressed, and often asked me to just "trust her" instead of explaining anything. Well, altho I'm sure she meant well, she was wrong several times. JDLJR is the only Rep I've known to be consistently accurate, knowledgable, patient & informative. I don't know what many of us would have done without his counsel & I just can't give him enough KUDOS!

BTW-I think I may have landed a part time job...will know next Wednesday--YAY!
Thanks Deerest! And congrats on your potential part time job!
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Old 08-28-2010, 07:02 PM
 
6 posts, read 9,553 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdljr View Post
It potentially could affect your claim, yes. I'll have to check. To give you an idea of how strict things can be, just yesterday I put some paperwork together to submit to Raleigh for someone who had refused a job. This person, who has been on UI since May 2009, was offered a temporary position in their line of work (painter) lasting just 1-2 weeks. It paid $12 per hour but the gentleman refused it because he said he "made $12 per hour 20 years ago". His last job he was a painting foreman and made $19 per hour. On his application for this position, he stated that he had "48 years experience painting all phases".

I reminded him that it was just a 1-2 week job, that at the end of the 1-2 weeks he could begin his UI claim again. I also reminded him that the $12 per hour equated out to far more than his $295 weekly benefit amount. He again refused the position even though I told him the refusal could stop his claim. He said he'd "take that risk". So I set the work refusal issue and will fax it to Raleigh Monday for them to adjudicate it. In the meantime and until they adjudicate it, his claim is stopped. He may have cost himself his entire remaining claim by refusing this temporary position. Or, he may not have. He refused suitable work. However, it was only temporary, so not sure how Raleigh will rule.
jdljr -
My part time job does not have a set schedule; some weeks they don't need me at all. Working conditions are very bad. I have an appt. set up with an agency next week (already talked with them at length as to what I am looking for) - and I want to be available for their office positions (which is what they specialize in). How would ESC know that I have left my part time job? They have never questioned me when I have weeks that I don't work due to not being on the schedule.

Thank you again for all of your help; as it is VERY much appreciated by many.
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Old 08-28-2010, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Boone, NC
1,155 posts, read 3,152,870 times
Reputation: 282
Quote:
Originally Posted by esjh View Post
jdljr -
My part time job does not have a set schedule; some weeks they don't need me at all. Working conditions are very bad. I have an appt. set up with an agency next week (already talked with them at length as to what I am looking for) - and I want to be available for their office positions (which is what they specialize in). How would ESC know that I have left my part time job? They have never questioned me when I have weeks that I don't work due to not being on the schedule.

Thank you again for all of your help; as it is VERY much appreciated by many.
Technically ESC wouldn't know if you left the job unless the employer told ESC. Some employers are spiteful, thinking that if they have work for someone, even part time, why should that person be collecting their full UI? Some employers don't realize that folks CAN have a part time job AND still collect UI (as long as they're maintaining their full time work search). I know you've said yours is 10 hours a week, and some weeks none, and it isn't enough to lessen your weekly benefit amount. Also (and I'm sure ESC doesn't pay that much attention), that employer would no longer be reporting quarterly wages.
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