U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-15-2006, 10:14 AM
 
1,035 posts, read 2,651,133 times
Reputation: 235

Advertisements

is what are you looking to get when you move??

In my situation, even with the costs difference, at the end of the day, I am only in a slightly better financial condition...the other things that money can't buy is my reason for going...

but again, will these other reasons dry up soon due to growth?? Will quality get lost? I guess you take your decision and make the best of whatever the future holds
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-15-2006, 10:30 AM
 
2,301 posts, read 1,895,132 times
Reputation: 317
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weis02
is what are you looking to get when you move??

In my situation, even with the costs difference, at the end of the day, I am only in a slightly better financial condition...the other things that money can't buy is my reason for going...

but again, will these other reasons dry up soon due to growth?? Will quality get lost? I guess you take your decision and make the best of whatever the future holds

Same here we will be a little better off financially and we are looking to a little better quality fo life. I know nothing is paradise. Most of us have to work in order to support our families and that means we must be in an area where we can get employment. Some do work from home and can live anywhere but those are isolated cases. Anyway my point is we need to live in an area that has jobs and jobs = more people. More people = more problems.

I watched Phoenix literally burnout from the growth and Charlotte doesn't look anywhere near what we have here yet. Will it? Yes I believe so, but it's part of the equation again, we are all seeking the same things.

The reality is people will continue to look for the best new places for home, work, raising families etc.

All I know is I need a change and where I'm going is gorgeous and I can buy a house for more than half the price there and be debt free except for my mortgage. I'll have 4 kids in College and we are footing that bill so it will be nice to free up some money for that. I'm 43 my husband is 47 and we don't have time to spare sitting here in Phoenix and watching our property values decline. We need to make things happen now.

Where we are moving looks like new things are happening.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2006, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Blue Ridge Mtns of NC
5,661 posts, read 24,645,421 times
Reputation: 3807
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weis02
is what are you looking to get when you move??

In my situation, even with the costs difference, at the end of the day, I am only in a slightly better financial condition...the other things that money can't buy is my reason for going...

but again, will these other reasons dry up soon due to growth?? Will quality get lost? I guess you take your decision and make the best of whatever the future holds
Well, for one thing the state/county tax burden in North Carolina is only average among the 50 states. So, I would probably not consider relocating to NC for tax reasons. There are around 25 other states that make more sense.

Growth and cost-of-living in the Charlotte and Raleigh metro areas does not reflect what's going on in the rest of the state anymore than the quality of life in the NYC metro area is a reflection of the entire state of New York. If my choices were limited to only living in those two metro areas, I would never consider North Carolina. I could do much better in some other state.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2006, 10:46 AM
 
Location: NW Phoenix
477 posts, read 1,438,735 times
Reputation: 148
Same here! We wont be getting rich out there. However, I am in the begining stage of working towards a nursing degree. It will just make life a little easier to have a cheaper mortgage payment, and a little less stressful to know I will be somewhere that I can enjoy the scenery rather than dread going outside.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2006, 10:49 AM
 
2,301 posts, read 1,895,132 times
Reputation: 317
Quote:
Originally Posted by mm34b
Well, for one thing the state/county tax burden in North Carolina is only average among the 50 states. So, I would probably not consider relocating to NC for tax reasons. There are around 25 other states that make more sense.

Growth and cost-of-living in the Charlotte and Raleigh metro areas does not reflect what's going on in the rest of the state anymore than the quality of life in the NYC metro area is a reflection of the entire state of New York. If my choices were limited to only living in those two metro areas, I would never consider North Carolina. I could do much better in some other state.

Any suggestion? I like no snow and NOT TEXAS!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2006, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Blue Ridge Mtns of NC
5,661 posts, read 24,645,421 times
Reputation: 3807
Quote:
Originally Posted by a1m1700
Any suggestion? I like no snow and NOT TEXAS!!
I need mountains and all four seasons, so I can't rule out an occassional dusting of snow even in the Southern Appalachians, but I don't want to have to buy a snow shovel either. My area in the NC Mountains (EL. 2,200 feet) averages less than 15" of snow per winter, so that I can live with. All-Wheel-Drive SUV with decent ground clearance and I'm good to go without shoveling if I absoultely must get out now. Snow doesn't normally remain more than a day or two anyway.

I get a break fom paying any state income in NC, but if I didn't, I'd probably be living in Tennessee or Virginia. As far as, state & local tax burdens, NC ranks 23rd highest, while VA is 41st and Tennessee is very low 47th. However, like NC, don't get too close to the largest cities or you'll end up paying a lot more than the folks in the rural areas. Like NC, you can choose flat land, hills or mountain regions.

Last edited by mm34b; 07-15-2006 at 11:59 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2006, 11:52 AM
 
1,126 posts, read 3,567,416 times
Reputation: 413
Quote:
Originally Posted by mm34b
Well, for one thing the state/county tax burden in North Carolina is only average among the 50 states. So, I would probably not consider relocating to NC for tax reasons. There are around 25 other states that make more sense.

Growth and cost-of-living in the Charlotte and Raleigh metro areas does not reflect what's going on in the rest of the state anymore than the quality of life in the NYC metro area is a reflection of the entire state of New York. If my choices were limited to only living in those two metro areas, I would never consider North Carolina. I could do much better in some other state.
Interesting. Like where?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2006, 12:08 PM
 
2,301 posts, read 1,895,132 times
Reputation: 317
Quote:
Originally Posted by mm34b
I need mountains and all four seasons, so I can't rule out an occassional dusting of snow even in the Southern Appalachians, but I don't want to have to buy a snow shovel either. My area in the NC Mountains (EL. 2,200 feet) averages less than 15" of snow per winter, so that I can live with. All-Wheel-Drive SUV with decent ground clearance and I'm good to go without shoveling if I absoultely must get out now. Snow doesn't normally remain more than a day or two anyway.

I get a break fom paying any state income in NC, but if I didn't, I'd probably be living in Tennessee or Virginia. As far as, state & local tax burdens, NC ranks 23rd highest, while VA is 41st and Tennessee is very low 47th. However, like NC, don't get too close to the largest cities or you'll end up paying a lot more than the folks in the rural areas. Like NC, you can choose flat land, hills or mountain regions.

Tennesse I think they had tornado problems recently. I have to strike that one. Me and momof2boys can't go there.

Virginia hmmmmmmm I heard that was a good one. The weather and the scenery is that too much like NY?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2006, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Blue Ridge Mtns of NC
5,661 posts, read 24,645,421 times
Reputation: 3807
Quote:
Originally Posted by a1m1700
Tennesse I think they had tornado problems recently. I have to strike that one. Me and momof2boys can't go there.

Virginia hmmmmmmm I heard that was a good one. The weather and the scenery is that too much like NY?
Tennesse like NC has a flat land region which is more prone to tornado activity, but unless you choose to live in that specific region, it's pretty much a non-issue.

Northern Virginia is suburban Washington, DC. Not normally severe winter weather, but major snowstorms do occur on occasion.

The Great Blizzard of '96 began early on Sunday, January 7. By Monday morning, Washington, DC was buried under 17 to 21 inches of snow. Thirty to 36 inches of snow fell over parts of the VA and MD suburbs. The entire region was paralyzed. As road crews worked hard to clear the snow, an "Alberta Clipper" shot through on Tuesday, January 9 dumping an additional 3 to 5 inches from Washington northeast through Baltimore. Plows that would have been working on secondary roads and residential areas were sent back to the primary roads. The Federal government remained shut for 4 days that week and many schools and businesses announced their closure for the entire week. A third storm struck on Friday, January 12 dumping another 4 to 12 inches over the metro area. By the week's end, most of the Washington metro area was buried under 2 to 3 feet of snow!

Last edited by mm34b; 07-15-2006 at 12:49 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2006, 12:25 PM
 
170 posts, read 518,026 times
Reputation: 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by a1m1700
Tennesse I think they had tornado problems recently. I have to strike that one. Me and momof2boys can't go there.

Virginia hmmmmmmm I heard that was a good one. The weather and the scenery is that too much like NY?

We actually went to Tennessee in April to check it out. Yes, the same days the deadly tornadoes hit. (I've never been so scared in my life! ). Anyway, I found that Tenn. is beautiful, absolutely. But I can't get past what I went through. Yes, the sales tax is over 9%, even on food. Ouch. But property taxes are rediculously low! So I think it all evens out a bit. I've checked into Virginia, but most of the areas I checked on were expensive! I couldn't come up with a reasonable area to live. But it is beautiful up there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:46 AM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top