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Old 08-02-2006, 11:45 PM
 
Location: FL
1,318 posts, read 3,999,031 times
Reputation: 791
Why do people do so much NY "bashing"?! I mean, that's where it all started! Remember the 13 colonies? Remember all the Brits & Euros & Irish etc that came here? Remember the biggest city in the US? Remember the financial heart of this country? I understand this is a NC board, but what gives? Seems like an envy type thing. Yeah yeah, loud, obnoxious, rude blah blah
Has anyone on THIS board from THAT area (of which there are MANY) ever been rude or obnoxious?
I just don't get it...
I've never understood the type of people who complain about people who complain, or have an "attitude" to people that have an attitude!
Anyone else see the irony in that?!
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Old 08-03-2006, 02:16 AM
 
Location: Greensboro, NC
1,261 posts, read 2,807,878 times
Reputation: 703
thisguy,
A thought crossed my mind while reading your post.

Say someone has a love for the way of life and culture of a place overseas and wants to live in the midst of it. Wouldn't it only make sense that you would want to try to join yourself to that culture and way of life as much as you could?

Sure, there would be some things from your American (or Canadian or whatever) way of life that you like enough to hold on to, but you wouldn't want to change that culture to be more American. I mean, if I really loved a place and its culture, I'd want to live like the people there and be surrounded by them. This, of course, doesn't mean you'd avoid your fellow Americans or that you'd be a fake in some way.


Now I realize that's more extreme than a Yankee moving south or a Southerner moving north, but hopefully I made enough sense for y'all to get what I'm trying to say. lol
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Old 08-03-2006, 02:56 AM
 
477 posts, read 1,565,088 times
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I never realized there was a situation with Yankees and Southern people. I live out west and I have never heard people from the north or south talk about each other. I know some really nice northern people, my neighbor from Maine, my babysitter from Vermont, very nice. I know a co-worker from South Carolina and a couple from Florida and a great friend from Virginia. So this is so new to me. Like Rodney King, was that his name?? said, "can we all just get along here?" I mean I dont see any difference with any one of them, north and south, except they are all nice good people. Maybe it is more like there are bad apples in every state but most are good apples. I think it is more like that.
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Old 08-03-2006, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn New York
957 posts, read 3,083,937 times
Reputation: 323
Quote:
Originally Posted by thisguy
So are you saying in a decade Cary will have a bagel store on every corner, filled with road rage, and people who don't wave or even acknowledge you as you walk by ?

I found it interesting I read a post here in the past week that a woman drove through many neighnorhoods/towns in her search for a new home in NC and she said Cary was the one that left her "cold", the ONLY one. Then I read someone else from NJ who said she wanted to be around "her people". So I think you have some good points and another reason despite its reputation I think Cary might not be the best for us midwesterners There are good people from any spot (NY/NJ) as well, but I don't see the point of moving someplace just to be surrounded and completely infest a place with people like from your old home - what fun is that? You don't totally have to "assimilate" nor change who you area, but meeting people halfway is not a bad thing.

Generally what happens in "ethnic" neighborhoods in the big northern (and I am sure southern cities) is whatever part of town the first transplants land in, eventually becomes dominated by that group, and sort of live in an isolated island of themselves in many ways. So would like some data on the highest ratio of NY/NJ transplants from 2004-2006 by community! Hah. I imagine the people looking to assimilate are going to be from outlying areas or areas like Rochester, Buffalo or outstate NY, and/or younger people who will be looking downtown. The ones who have $600K homes will want the same lifestyle on half the price and the "necessities" for that lifestyle.
I grew up and lived in Detroit till I was 22, then lived in Tenn for 5 years and in NC for 12 years. I have now lived in NYC for 7 years. Believe me the three sections of the country are very different. Now, the standing joke in NC for years is that CARY stands for Concentrated Area of Relocated Yankees. Which is acutlly pretty accurate. For those moving from the Northern areas, you need to know that within NC it is very different from area to area. I lived in Western NC for 5 years. Since lots of people from there had worked in or had family who worked in the large Midwestern cities, there was less anti northern sentiment. When I moved to the Coastal plane in Greenville, the anti-yankee sentiment was very strong. Of course, they loved working for the Yankee factories that had moved down there because they paid much better, but it was still very much an us vs them kind of mentality. I would suspect that the piedmont area is less "Southern" that the other ends of the State.
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Old 08-03-2006, 08:18 AM
 
Location: ♥State of the heart♥
1,117 posts, read 3,130,534 times
Reputation: 780
Quote:
Originally Posted by elfyum
Why do people do so much NY "bashing"?! I mean, that's where it all started! Remember the 13 colonies?
For information only: Virginia was the first colony originally chartered by Sir Walter Raleigh in 1584, The First Virginia Charter established in 1606. The colony of New York was established in 1624.

Quote:
Originally Posted by elfyum
Has anyone on THIS board from THAT area (of which there are MANY) ever been rude or obnoxious?
I just don't get it...
I've never understood the type of people who complain about people who complain, or have an "attitude" to people that have an attitude!
Anyone else see the irony in that?!
I understand what you are trying to convey, but I have to say that I lived in an area 20 years ago that saw a sudden influx of New Yorkers. And yes, they brought a different vibe.

I say that without malice, because I understand that we learn certain modes of behavior according to what is required to function in a particular society. And the town/area that we live in is our micro-society, just like the USA is our macro-society. New York/ North Jersey requires a different, and realistically, more assertive behavior than a less populated, quieter area might because of the demands placed by higher populations, denser traffic.

It comes down to what we learn from each other as to what is required to function in our little corner of the world.

Does that mean that people from NY/NJ are not nice people? Certainly not, we know some in my town from that area that are nice people, happy to slow down their lives, and some are real firecrackers - can't seem to shake the intensity.

Right now my (seashore) town has an influx of Canadians, mostly from the Quebec region. I've met very pleasant people visiting here, but what they don't realize is that we don't walk into supermarkets wearing just a swimsuit and flip flops, or as I saw just yesterday, a man in a speedo and t-shirt only. And it was not a long t-shirt either. That is what they wear on vacation in Canada I assume, but we don't do it here. It's strictly a cultural difference.
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Old 08-03-2006, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Wake Forest NC
1,611 posts, read 3,185,585 times
Reputation: 864
Quote:
Originally Posted by thisguy
So are you saying in a decade Cary will have a bagel store on every corner, filled with road rage, and people who don't wave or even acknowledge you as you walk by ? .
What do I know? Maybe so. When we looked there it felt so much like the Long Island of 5 years ago that I was spooked & 'just said no' to looking further there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by thisguy
Then I read someone else from NJ who said she wanted to be around "her people".... but I don't see the point of moving someplace just to be surrounded and completely infest a place with people like from your old home - what fun is that? You don't totally have to "assimilate" nor change who you area, but meeting people halfway is not a bad thing..
Maybe she wanted to begin her new life in a place where she would not be greeted by open hostility.

BTW, who among us feels that we will "infest" a place with our lifestyle?!?! Is the midwestern or New England "lifestyle" somehow more acceptable to Southerners? What is that lifestyle anyway? More & more I think our lives, as Americans, are differentiated more by $ than by region.

Yesterday as I was driving to the bookstore at about 5:30 pm, I saw nice cars pulling up to the fast food restaurants, just like back on Long Island. By the bookstore there was a Starbucks with yuppies inside. I passed a Blockbuster too. Was every store there supported only by Northerners? Or, do the natives & transplants at a certain income level want the same things?
Now when I was up in Massachussetts in the spring I also saw all of these things, that had not been there when I lived there in the eighties ('cept the bookstore of course, that HAD been there!)

Quote:
Originally Posted by thisguy
I imagine the people looking to assimilate are going to be from outlying areas or areas like Rochester, Buffalo or outstate NY, and/or younger people who will be looking downtown. The ones who have $600K homes will want the same lifestyle on half the price and the "necessities" for that lifestyle.
I think that people from ANYWHERE may (or may not) wish to assimilate, but that, again, economic factors may be more determinative. On Long Island a $600K house is often a modest split level, 2000 sf on 1/4 acre or less with 10-15K/ year taxes. That is considered a middle class house. "Impressive" Long Island houses start at about $750K.
I noticed there are million dollar developments in Cary. If someone with lots of equity cashes out & can put down 500-600K then yes they can live that amazing lifestyle.
Have any people in that position weighed in on this board? Not that I have seen. I have seen the more middle class people posting.
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Old 08-03-2006, 11:07 AM
 
Location: MI
330 posts, read 777,255 times
Reputation: 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by elfyum
Why do people do so much NY "bashing"?! I mean, that's where it all started! Remember the 13 colonies? Remember all the Brits & Euros & Irish etc that came here? Remember the biggest city in the US? Remember the financial heart of this country? I understand this is a NC board, but what gives? Seems like an envy type thing. Yeah yeah, loud, obnoxious, rude blah blah
Has anyone on THIS board from THAT area (of which there are MANY) ever been rude or obnoxious?
I just don't get it...
I've never understood the type of people who complain about people who complain, or have an "attitude" to people that have an attitude!
Anyone else see the irony in that?!
Elfyum

I have only been to NYC as a tourist and I enjoy the city. However, i went to college with a whole bunch of NY/NJers. The outstate ones are awesome (Buffalo, Rochester, etc) same attitude as Midwesterners. The ones from the city - well if you did not look like them, act like them, dress like them, have the same wealth as them, drove the same cars or had the same trust funds, they would not even look at you or talk to you. I went to a Midwest college where apparently mommy and daddy send their NY/NJ kids if they don't get into the Ivy leagues. They stick to themselves in their "group" and don't want to be part of any wider group. In fact they had their own fraternities and sororities so they could be with "their own people". Now with that said, this is the "upper crust" type of people and not representative of the whole city, this I understand. Like I said, there are good people everywhere - and bad. My personal belief is those who never had to struggle for anything in their life generally are not people who have the most open or best personalities. So maybe my view is a bit skewed by the population I interacted with, but let me also say this was not 20 people, this was a group of maybe 1-2K of student population. So I am not picking 8 people and saying, wow everyone must be like this. So I am thinking if it was like this in college where you are almost FORCED to interact with others, since we all live in the same dorms, walk the same paths, in the same classes, are on the same relatively small campus etc and yet they still all cluster together and "outcast" the rest of the peons, I can only imagine how much easier it will be in a whole metro area.

Again, my experience is those from outside the metro NYC area are actually some of the best people I met in college. Its just the 'entitlement' people that rub everyone the wrong way (sounds like CA has the same issues from what i read on the board)

Last edited by thisguy; 08-03-2006 at 11:24 AM..
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Old 08-03-2006, 11:14 AM
 
Location: MI
330 posts, read 777,255 times
Reputation: 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Niki
thisguy,
A thought crossed my mind while reading your post.

Say someone has a love for the way of life and culture of a place overseas and wants to live in the midst of it. Wouldn't it only make sense that you would want to try to join yourself to that culture and way of life as much as you could?

Sure, there would be some things from your American (or Canadian or whatever) way of life that you like enough to hold on to, but you wouldn't want to change that culture to be more American. I mean, if I really loved a place and its culture, I'd want to live like the people there and be surrounded by them. This, of course, doesn't mean you'd avoid your fellow Americans or that you'd be a fake in some way.


Now I realize that's more extreme than a Yankee moving south or a Southerner moving north, but hopefully I made enough sense for y'all to get what I'm trying to say. lol
Niki, I understand your point. But I guess what I was getting at even more was, just because you go somewhere you shouldn't try to change it so much. It is almost 'disrepectful'. Yes time and new people change everyplace, especially in a mobile society such as the US. There will be some things if/when I move down to NC I will miss from here, and wish were there, and things I won't "love" about NC (just as there are things they I won't miss from here). But I won't go down there with the attitude "I am going down there and creating a place where *MY* people will feel like home"

Because the new place WOULD be home, the good and the bad.

Again as more northerners move down there the fabric will change slowly, but to go down there and say "I want to be with my people" or have that attitude, well thats sort of strange to me. When I read some of these posts from us folks up north, now I can see why there is some 'hostility' to all the northerners moving down. It is like, we are coming down there, en masse, and bringing everything we had up here down to you, and you are going to like it... and/or we are coming down there, en masse, and we are going to create our own area away from the rest of you, so that we can live the 'right way' as it should be, as we lived here in the north.

Huh?
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Old 08-03-2006, 11:21 AM
 
Location: MI
330 posts, read 777,255 times
Reputation: 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYer
What do I know? Maybe so. When we looked there it felt so much like the Long Island of 5 years ago that I was spooked & 'just said no' to looking further there.



Maybe she wanted to begin her new life in a place where she would not be greeted by open hostility.

BTW, who among us feels that we will "infest" a place with our lifestyle?!?! Is the midwestern or New England "lifestyle" somehow more acceptable to Southerners? What is that lifestyle anyway? More & more I think our lives, as Americans, are differentiated more by $ than by region.

Yesterday as I was driving to the bookstore at about 5:30 pm, I saw nice cars pulling up to the fast food restaurants, just like back on Long Island. By the bookstore there was a Starbucks with yuppies inside. I passed a Blockbuster too. Was every store there supported only by Northerners? Or, do the natives & transplants at a certain income level want the same things?
Now when I was up in Massachussetts in the spring I also saw all of these things, that had not been there when I lived there in the eighties ('cept the bookstore of course, that HAD been there!)



I think that people from ANYWHERE may (or may not) wish to assimilate, but that, again, economic factors may be more determinative. On Long Island a $600K house is often a modest split level, 2000 sf on 1/4 acre or less with 10-15K/ year taxes. That is considered a middle class house. "Impressive" Long Island houses start at about $750K.
I noticed there are million dollar developments in Cary. If someone with lots of equity cashes out & can put down 500-600K then yes they can live that amazing lifestyle.
Have any people in that position weighed in on this board? Not that I have seen. I have seen the more middle class people posting.
Good points. It might be economic more than anything, but I have met very down to earch 'rich' kids from suburban detroit and snotty middle class kids so that is generally a generalization. I think its how the parents raise them too.

Your point about the houses is interesting. "Middle class" people living in areas that appreciated like crazy sort of hit the lottery if they are willing to move to lower cost areas. Say they bought a house in mid 90s for $XXX, and same house in 2006 is now worth $800K. Just by happenstance they happened to live in a highly desirable area that appreciated...but then they get sick of it, or life in the area and move to lower cost area. Suddenly they are the rich (at least in house!) in the new area. So maybe all the "house rich" people will be congregrating together, but i wonder what % of average native NC's are going to be able to afford these $400-$600K houses I see some of the national builders putting up? I doubt many. It is interesting though to watch it from an economist standpoint. People who are middle class in their own minds and middle class in lifestyle due to high costs of living, moving to a new area and suddenly able to have anything and everything they want due to home equity hmmm...
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Old 08-03-2006, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn New York
957 posts, read 3,083,937 times
Reputation: 323
Quote:
Originally Posted by thisguy
Elfyum

I have only been to NYC as a tourist and I enjoy the city. However, i went to college with a whole bunch of NY/NJers. The outstate ones are awesome (Buffalo, Rochester, etc) same attitude as Midwesterners. The ones from the city - well if you did not look like them, act like them, dress like them, have the same wealth as them, drove the same cars or had the same trust funds, they would not even look at you or talk to you. I went to a Midwest college where apparently mommy and daddy send their NY/NJ kids if they don't get into the Ivy leagues. They stick to themselves in their "group" and don't want to be part of any wider group. In fact they had their own fraternities and sororities so they could be with "their own people". Now with that said, this is the "upper crust" type of people and not representative of the whole city, this I understand. Like I said, there are good people everywhere - and bad. My personal belief is those who never had to struggle for anything in their life generally are not people who have the most open or best personalities. So maybe my view is a bit skewed by the population I interacted with, but let me also say this was not 20 people, this was a group of maybe 1-2K of student population. So I am not picking 8 people and saying, wow everyone must be like this. So I am thinking if it was like this in college where you are almost FORCED to interact with others, since we all live in the same dorms, walk the same paths, in the same classes, are on the same relatively small campus etc and yet they still all cluster together and "outcast" the rest of the peons, I can only imagine how much easier it will be in a whole metro area.

Again, my experience is those from outside the metro NYC area are actually some of the best people I met in college. Its just the 'entitlement' people that rub everyone the wrong way (sounds like CA has the same issues from what i read on the board)
I was born and raised in Detroit. I lived in TN (5 years in college) and then in NC for 12 years. I have now lived in NYC for 7 years. Some of what you are saying is on target. The people I have met from Upstate, generally remind me of midwesterners. I work at a university, so I have run into the kind of "snot nosed rich kids", you described coming to your college. However I think the run of the mill working stiff in NYC gets a bad rap. My contention is that if you jammed as many North Carolinians in close proximity as we live here in NYC, you would have range wars! In my neighborhood in Brooklyn, we watch each others cars, say hi in the Grocery stores, gossip about the latest whatever moving into the area. I think the perception that all new yorkers are arrogant, loud and mean is truly an injustice.
Granted, when I go down south to see my mom and other relatives in NC, i have to slow down a bit and not get impatient with the store clerk discussing the weather. However, when I come back to the city I have to get my game face on. It is just a function of being in the biggest city in the nation.
After 9-11 I saw many selfless acts of compassion that really opened my eyes to what New Yorkers will do when called upon.
"That's all I have to say about that."
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