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Old 08-08-2010, 02:12 AM
 
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It's not the heat. Having spent many months in Colorado Springs and Denver, I would much rather have temperatures close to 100 with humidity as low as the quasi-dessert areas.

I assume your home has a heat-pump/swamp-cooler and not any sort of freon a/c unit? That kind of stuff works in dry climates, but Minnesota and eastern North Dakota are so humid, it's like swimming. Freon (or whatever the new stuff is called) is the only way to combat the moisture here.
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Old 08-08-2010, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
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What Acfreema said. Western ND is not as humid as say southern Minnesota, but you will still find yourself investing in a dehumidifier. Utah's heat is dry. ND's heat is humid. I'd really suggest trekking up there, say anywhere along the Red River valley, during a heat wave, to see what you're in for during the summer months. 80 degrees at 100% humidity is a lot more uncomfortable than 110 degrees at 10% humidity (like we get in the western high deserts).

Actually, if this is a factor, you might want to look into the Elko NV area instead, or somewhere north of Spokane. Not to dis ND (most beautiful of all states) but the fact is you can't get a profusion of greenery and a comfortably-dry climate in the same place.
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Old 08-08-2010, 08:59 AM
 
Location: 125 Years Too Late...
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Originally Posted by Reziac View Post
What Acfreema said. Western ND is not as humid as say southern Minnesota, but you will still find yourself investing in a dehumidifier. Utah's heat is dry. ND's heat is humid. I'd really suggest trekking up there, say anywhere along the Red River valley, during a heat wave, to see what you're in for during the summer months. 80 degrees at 100% humidity is a lot more uncomfortable than 110 degrees at 10% humidity (like we get in the western high deserts).

Actually, if this is a factor, you might want to look into the Elko NV area instead, or somewhere north of Spokane. Not to dis ND (most beautiful of all states) but the fact is you can't get a profusion of greenery and a comfortably-dry climate in the same place.
Well Elko is very similar in climate to where I am (too hot in the summer). I have looked at the Kettle Falls area in northern Washington state. Beautiful area. But it seems I'm restricted to areas as far north as I can get. I don't mind very cold winters, but hot summers basically ruin my life. I get sluggish, constantly sweaty and I just can't do the outdoor type of stuff that I do the rest of the year. There are very few places in Utah that don't get too hot in the summer. Of course there are the mountains, but there aren't really any towns (other than expensive resorts) up their. All the towns are built down in the desert heat! Not to mention the rich folks have moved in and taken real estate prices to pathetic levels. There is a small mountain valley with the towns of Randolph and Woodruff with acceptable summer temps (sometimes even frost in the summer!), but income is a problem AND property is expensive.

As far as the "perfect climate" for me in the US (besides Alaska)--I think the closest it gets is the far northern portions of Maine. Unfortunately, I don't think that area is feasible for me for various reasons. Also, UP Michigan. I'd love to live in the UP, but again, I have some reservations. That leaves North Dakota. However, I don't want to be sweltering all summer, either. Otherwise I'll just stay put. I guess further research on ND climate is in order. It can't be like Florida though!
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Old 08-08-2010, 09:51 AM
 
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Originally Posted by ChrisC View Post
Well Elko is very similar in climate to where I am (too hot in the summer). I have looked at the Kettle Falls area in northern Washington state. Beautiful area. But it seems I'm restricted to areas as far north as I can get. I don't mind very cold winters, but hot summers basically ruin my life. I get sluggish, constantly sweaty and I just can't do the outdoor type of stuff that I do the rest of the year. There are very few places in Utah that don't get too hot in the summer. Of course there are the mountains, but there aren't really any towns (other than expensive resorts) up their. All the towns are built down in the desert heat! Not to mention the rich folks have moved in and taken real estate prices to pathetic levels. There is a small mountain valley with the towns of Randolph and Woodruff with acceptable summer temps (sometimes even frost in the summer!), but income is a problem AND property is expensive.

As far as the "perfect climate" for me in the US (besides Alaska)--I think the closest it gets is the far northern portions of Maine. Unfortunately, I don't think that area is feasible for me for various reasons. Also, UP Michigan. I'd love to live in the UP, but again, I have some reservations. That leaves North Dakota. However, I don't want to be sweltering all summer, either. Otherwise I'll just stay put. I guess further research on ND climate is in order. It can't be like Florida though!
No, my friend! I can't be like FL. This so-called paradise and "sunshine state" is a sham. It rains virtually everyday with thunderstorms. Honestly, I grew up in MD. I never recall such oppressive humidity like here in FL. There are no breaks here from May to Oct (and sometimes longer)--muggy, muggy day in and day out. When it rains, I swear it's like warm ****. I just can't stand another day in this place. Sure, I may end-up in another area where there is humidity, but farther north where cool fronts give some relief from time to time or at a higher elevation. All I am waiting for is a buyer for my place, and I'm "outta" here!!
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Old 08-08-2010, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
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Originally Posted by Floridahater View Post
No, my friend! I can't be like FL. This so-called paradise and "sunshine state" is a sham. It rains virtually everyday with thunderstorms. Honestly, I grew up in MD. I never recall such oppressive humidity like here in FL. There are no breaks here from May to Oct (and sometimes longer)--muggy, muggy day in and day out. When it rains, I swear it's like warm ****. I just can't stand another day in this place. Sure, I may end-up in another area where there is humidity, but farther north where cool fronts give some relief from time to time or at a higher elevation. All I am waiting for is a buyer for my place, and I'm "outta" here!!
I think you just discouraged all the buyers
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Old 08-08-2010, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
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Originally Posted by ChrisC View Post
[Utah] All the towns are built down in the desert heat! Not to mention the rich folks have moved in and taken real estate prices to pathetic levels. There is a small mountain valley with the towns of Randolph and Woodruff with acceptable summer temps (sometimes even frost in the summer!), but income is a problem AND property is expensive.
So you need to be in commute distance of a real city for income? (Did you say what you do? I forget.) That leaves out almost all of ND too, other than the Red River Valley, Bismarck, and maybe Minot or Williston. Kills a chunk of NE and NW Montana as well. Those little towns in ND are just that, LITTLE. Barely supporting existing local businesses, or maybe nothing there but a few houses left behind from a century ago when there were so many more farming centers all over the midwest. While they could use some help staying alive, it won't help if you compete with what's already there.

Does sound like a good project for a truck and travel trailer, tho -- so you'd have your house with you and be able to pack up and leave, house and all, if it didn't work out for job or climate or whatever. And the truck so you've got everyday transport that's more practical than an RV. There are RV parks all over that allow long-term tenants, fairly economically. And decent older trailers are a dime a dozen. For comparison -- someone just gave me a 24-footer, it's a 1974 model but in pretty good livable shape... market value $700 tops. Actual living space about 160 square feet (it has a full kitchen, and a full bathroom with a regular flush toilet and a 3/4 sized tub). A little replumbing and it could be hooked up to a regular trailer spot.
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Old 08-08-2010, 01:41 PM
 
Location: 125 Years Too Late...
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Originally Posted by Reziac View Post
So you need to be in commute distance of a real city for income? (Did you say what you do? I forget.) That leaves out almost all of ND too, other than the Red River Valley, Bismarck, and maybe Minot or Williston. Kills a chunk of NE and NW Montana as well. Those little towns in ND are just that, LITTLE. Barely supporting existing local businesses, or maybe nothing there but a few houses left behind from a century ago when there were so many more farming centers all over the midwest. While they could use some help staying alive, it won't help if you compete with what's already there.

Does sound like a good project for a truck and travel trailer, tho -- so you'd have your house with you and be able to pack up and leave, house and all, if it didn't work out for job or climate or whatever. And the truck so you've got everyday transport that's more practical than an RV. There are RV parks all over that allow long-term tenants, fairly economically. And decent older trailers are a dime a dozen. For comparison -- someone just gave me a 24-footer, it's a 1974 model but in pretty good livable shape... market value $700 tops. Actual living space about 160 square feet (it has a full kitchen, and a full bathroom with a regular flush toilet and a 3/4 sized tub). A little replumbing and it could be hooked up to a regular trailer spot.
Ehhhh, I'm the kind of person who can (and has) lived on $15,000 a year. I just don't want or need the McMansion, expensive car, and typically excessive lifestyle. And I don't mind rice and beans. When I make the move, I'm planning on having enough cash to build a very small home (in the range of 300 sq ft), extra cash to live on for a few months, and no debt at all. So, theoretically, I could survive doing pretty much anything that is around the area for work. The property that I have (tentatively) purchased is within commuting distance of Park River, Grafton... and if I want to push it, Grand Forks.

As far as what I do, I'm "educated," but that doesn't mean I'm too good to actually work. Right now I teach math for "fun" (because I could make more at McDonalds) and work a second full-time job at night (laborer in an industrial setting) to save up for this move. Honestly, I really don't care what I do (and I've worked many different kinds of jobs over the years using both my back and/or my brain), as long as it pays enough to support a minimalist/simple living lifestyle. I have no wife, no kids, and will soon have no financial obligations other than living expenses.

The thing that attracted me to North Dakota initially is the climate, geography, and sparse population. I'm a very small-town/rural kind of guy whose home "grew out of him." Population has exploded around here, and I HATE every day of it. There are more people living in my rather small valley as there are living in your entire state! As I've been checking into a few relocation areas over the past couple of years, I've noted that real estate prices are very low in northeast North Dakota. That was the clincher. Now, I'm not dumb; I know there is a reason for that--mainly lack of the kind of work that lures people to big cities (and the high prices that necessitates that kind of work), the climate, and I don't know how many times I've been told there is "nothing to do" there.

In reference to those points:

Since I'm essentially a winter weather lover, the climate doesn't scare me at all. In fact I can't wait to get there!

And why is it an advantage to be in an area like I'm in now and pay $60,000 dollars for a 50 by 140 ft lot, build a home on it for 150 - 200 K (codes will only allow McMansions here--no small, efficient homes), pay ridiculous property tax, and curse every day of my life because of the absolute mess and traffic around here, and be forced to have a high-paying job to try and afford all of that, over buying that same lot in North Dakota for less than $1000, building a very small home on it for a fraction of the cost, paying a fraction to heat it and power it (300 sq ft is pretty cheap to heat and power), not having the hassles of horrible over-crowding, and taking a job at a far smaller wage to fund it. I don't see that as being a bad thing at all. I'll work for minimum wage or near minimum wage if it pays what few bills I'd have. It's a lifestyle choice most would not make. But, as I said, I'm a minimalist, who doesn't need the toys, junk, and trip to the Bahamas every year. So, as for the lack of high-paying jobs in the area, I figure if I don't have a lot of useless crap to spend all that money on, I really won't need it. And like I said, I'm not picky. I'll clean horse stalls. I don't care! I've also toyed around with an internet business selling/providing a service that I strongly believe in and I think could, although never attaining mainstream success, definitely bring a "cult" following of enthusiastic supporters and possibly an extra income worth mentioning. I'm looking into that right now.

As far as "nothing to do," I don't need anything to do in that regard. I'm pretty self-contained when it comes to keeping myself occupied. With all the "things to do" around my area, I do none of them--I'm too busy doing the things I come up with to do on my own! I don't need any help finding things to do and I certainly don't need to be entertained.



At any rate, I will find out for sure if the northeast corner of North Dakota is for me or not in about a week and a half! All I have are pictures of "my" property. I'm making a quick drive up to check the entire area out.






Sorry for the long post and hijack, but I find the topic of moving to North Dakota consumes more and more of my time as I get closer to being able to do it.
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Old 08-08-2010, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
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Well, for that little invested, and being that flexible about work, I don't see how you could fail. There's always someone needing a willing pair of hands, even if it's part time it should be enough to get by on, given your requirements. And you might be up beyond the worst of the humidity. Winter you'll get in full.

Now that we've got all the objections disposed of... it's a beautiful area, pleasant and quiet, and I want to see that mini-house once it's finished. And while it's in progress for that matter. I think it will be a cool project to follow from start to finish.

I've noticed that I don't really need a lot of living space myself -- what I need is a lot of storage! The part of the house I actually LIVE in comprises exactly one room. But as life goes on, stuff accumulates that I'd regret leaving behind... so... storage. Lots of it. Whole barns worth would be about right.
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Old 08-08-2010, 04:39 PM
 
Location: 125 Years Too Late...
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Originally Posted by Reziac View Post
Well, for that little invested, and being that flexible about work, I don't see how you could fail. There's always someone needing a willing pair of hands, even if it's part time it should be enough to get by on, given your requirements. And you might be up beyond the worst of the humidity. Winter you'll get in full.
Yes, I hope by sticking to the northern area I can avoid the brunt of the high heat/humidity for the most part. I know it gets hot/humid in the summer at times... but I'm hoping that's broken up with cooler cycles as well. And... yes, I do like winters and snow, but your winters are brutal. We'll see how I get through that 40 below stuff...

And, if by some odd chance, I don't like it at all when I come and check it out, I won't lose much on the investment if I decide not to build--perhaps hang onto the lot for a couple of decades and resell it when the masses discover what they've been missing out on in ND. But, I haven't seen anything yet that would lead me to believe I won't like the area.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Reziac View Post
Now that we've got all the objections disposed of... it's a beautiful area, pleasant and quiet,
That's what I want to hear! Seriously, from all the photos I've sifted through of the area, it really is beautiful. Of course, it will be completely different from the mountains and dry deserts that I'm used to. I can only imagine what the majestic skies are like up your way, with no mountains to block the view!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Reziac View Post
and I want to see that mini-house once it's finished. And while it's in progress for that matter. I think it will be a cool project to follow from start to finish.
I've always liked really small houses/living spaces for some reason (and lived in them, for the most part). There are a few websites/companies that specialize in tiny homes. I'm a big fan. There are certain things that I would like to see in a small home that I don't see in those designs, though. So a few years ago, I started toying around with designing small homes myself (both conventional and timber framed). I've done a bunch of them at least to the "sketch-up" phase. A few, I've actually done the structural for and drawn up the elevations (I have a bit of a background in structural engineering). I'll have to post my favorite that I plan on building (I'm in the process of doing the elevations, material lists, structural and mechnical drawings right now). I tend to base designs on some of my favorite styles from the past. This one is sort of a mini version of the "arts and crafts" style and bungalow style from 80 to 100 years ago. But I usually go for a very simplified and stripped down version, since that brings the cost and required building time/skill down.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Reziac View Post
I've noticed that I don't really need a lot of living space myself -- what I need is a lot of storage! The part of the house I actually LIVE in comprises exactly one room. But as life goes on, stuff accumulates that I'd regret leaving behind... so... storage. Lots of it. Whole barns worth would be about right.
With me, I find that as soon as I have extra space, it quickly fills up with stuff that I have no real use for, other than collecting dust! Luckily, my hobbies tend to not take much space. I know one thing I'll definitely want up there is a garage off in back of the home somewhere; so that can collect the junk (aside from the car) that I really do... "need."
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Old 08-08-2010, 05:36 PM
 
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Originally Posted by acfreema View Post
Are you aware of what summers are like in the midcontinent states? Most of the summer is 80+F and 80+% humidity during the day, still over 70% at night. If you don't like heat and humidity, I suggest you re-evaluate your chose of destination.
Baloney !

Source please............
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