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Old 09-20-2007, 09:28 AM
 
Location: So. Dak.
13,495 posts, read 33,423,325 times
Reputation: 15044

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Anderson, what a beautiful pic! You live in a very nice area.
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Old 09-26-2007, 12:13 PM
 
Location: norway
1 posts, read 17,895 times
Reputation: 11
i love north dakota
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Old 10-01-2007, 07:45 PM
 
28 posts, read 144,742 times
Reputation: 17
Hey snowblind, I noticed a few of your pics from UMary and at the Bowl for football games. If you're a regular game-attender, I'm the new Pep Band director at UMary.
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Old 10-06-2007, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Lake Metigoshe, ND
325 posts, read 1,397,042 times
Reputation: 222
I have a request for anyone that has a digital camera around Lake Metegoshe and/or the North Dakota badlands. Would like to see some fall pictures of those areas.
Thanks! in advance...
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Old 10-30-2007, 11:54 AM
 
Location: California
43 posts, read 319,139 times
Reputation: 26
Does anyone have pictures of the snow in Williston town...how much do they get and all that....
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Old 12-16-2007, 10:41 AM
 
6 posts, read 34,867 times
Reputation: 10
Those pics were absolutely beautiful!
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Old 12-26-2007, 01:31 PM
 
Location: 河南郑州, Kansas City, Iowa, Fargo
253 posts, read 1,479,292 times
Reputation: 189
National Geographic took some haunting photos of NoDak.

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/ng...otography.html
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Old 12-30-2007, 07:19 AM
 
103 posts, read 661,335 times
Reputation: 47
National Geographics portrayal of rural ND is pathetic. Hanks, Epping, Grenora are all near Williston. There are numerous prosperous farms with nice homes, barns, and shops, neatly surrounded by shelter belts. There are miles and miles of flowing fields of wheat and pastures full of cattle. The last time I was in Epping, was to their yearly parade they have promoting the wonderful museum there, along with the busy summer camp at Springbrook. Most people that choose to live in Epping, Grenora and the Hanks area are usually farmers or drive to work in Williston. There is an Oil boom taking place in the region, and this is all they could come up with? I've been to Belfield many many times...it is on I-94 "people from National Geographic."..it has huge truck stops, motels, oil field energy companies...and all they could find to photograph in Belfield was a lonely, snow brushed prairie trail leading to an abandoned farmstead? This is so typical of the national news media. ND is a rural farm state for the most part. Back in the 30's it took many many people to farm the land...today, with all the new advancements in farming, ONE farmer can do the same job on more land, then what took many farmers on less land back in the 30's. The fact of the matter is, you don't need all those families and farms anymore in order to farm. Also, National Geographic didn't show any modern paved or 4lane highways on their pathetic pictures. People in western ND no longer have to live on the farm, they drive the 20 to 30 miles from their comfortable, modern homes in larger towns and drive to their farms to do their chores. Times have changed National Geographic, but you wouldn't know that being stuck in your imaginery world out in Washington DC.
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Old 12-30-2007, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Nebraska
4,179 posts, read 9,113,598 times
Reputation: 9523
Hey - is that abandoned farmstead for sale?
Grin.
I'd like to see some photos of the country, not the city, that show the changing seasons. While others may want the rush and bustle of a growing city, I've had enough of all that. How bout some cattle pics, some snow pics, some wild animal pics, some seasonal pics that show the various glories?
Or, maybe not. After all, you don't want everyone rushing there and ruining it!
Don't be shy, folks.. what might be normal and boring to you just might make some of us all warm and fuzzy...
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Old 12-30-2007, 01:32 PM
 
Location: South Dakota
1,961 posts, read 6,034,767 times
Reputation: 973
Quote:
Originally Posted by chester View Post
National Geographics portrayal of rural ND is pathetic. Hanks, Epping, Grenora are all near Williston. There are numerous prosperous farms with nice homes, barns, and shops, neatly surrounded by shelter belts. There are miles and miles of flowing fields of wheat and pastures full of cattle. The last time I was in Epping, was to their yearly parade they have promoting the wonderful museum there, along with the busy summer camp at Springbrook. Most people that choose to live in Epping, Grenora and the Hanks area are usually farmers or drive to work in Williston. There is an Oil boom taking place in the region, and this is all they could come up with? I've been to Belfield many many times...it is on I-94 "people from National Geographic."..it has huge truck stops, motels, oil field energy companies...and all they could find to photograph in Belfield was a lonely, snow brushed prairie trail leading to an abandoned farmstead? This is so typical of the national news media. ND is a rural farm state for the most part. Back in the 30's it took many many people to farm the land...today, with all the new advancements in farming, ONE farmer can do the same job on more land, then what took many farmers on less land back in the 30's. The fact of the matter is, you don't need all those families and farms anymore in order to farm. Also, National Geographic didn't show any modern paved or 4lane highways on their pathetic pictures. People in western ND no longer have to live on the farm, they drive the 20 to 30 miles from their comfortable, modern homes in larger towns and drive to their farms to do their chores. Times have changed National Geographic, but you wouldn't know that being stuck in your imaginery world out in Washington DC.
I agree with this post. I venture that South Dakota has a number of similarities with North Dakota but with 150,000 more people. I have seen the National Geographic article that was mentioned and it paints a gloomy picture of North Dakota and does not point out as many good things about it as it should have done. Yes, there are a number of areas that are going through population decline and consolidation, but there are other areas up there that are holding their own and actually growing. With a lot of these rural areas, there is less of a need to have as many farms and small towns with the advent of tractors and techonology requiring less farm labor.
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