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Old 02-16-2010, 10:43 PM
 
1 posts, read 3,812 times
Reputation: 13

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We moved to Grand Forks a year ago because my husband got a job with University of North Dakota. We've lived many places in the past few years (yeah for an economy like a bucking bronco!) and Grand Forks has been BY FAR the hardest place to make friends. We're very outgoing people with a background and values very similiar to the area, and we have no idea why we can't make friends. It's very strange to have lived here a year and still not have a single set of friends. We know a couple who is in the Air Force and they agree that it's the least friendly place they've ever lived as well !

 
Old 02-17-2010, 01:38 AM
 
5 posts, read 10,588 times
Reputation: 17
I prefer to look at this situation as opportunity knocking not incentives to beg. (think welfare). There are thousand upon thousands of acres of farm land lying fallow across the nation as the rural population ages.

Out of the teeming millions in the economically challenged cities there are surely several hundred thousands who would relish living in 21st century rural America. I have roots in Paris,TN. A wonderful town. A good place to live.

History does not lie. New people will eventually claim any land the inhabitants of which go into decline. Or the land will just lie empty and fallow.
The people in Hazelton and many other dying towns now realize its the people which make the land productive while the land only gives opportunity to people. When the people go, productivity goes. Producing crops without producing children for the next generation is still failure.

Forty acres is but a pittance when you look at the values assigned to land in the county assessors record books. If land is not worked it is not producing any value. Hazelton is not productive, so it is dying.

Maybe Hazelton could send to Germany for emigrants. Maybe Hazelton could invite a church, Black or White to move its congregation to Hazelton. Land and the opportunity to grow on the land will attract the kind of people Hazelton needs. No matter how you cut it they need new people.

One man or a small church could make a tidy sum of money leasing land and raising fodder beets to make alcohol. There is an economic calculus which is also at play. Land is the key. There is no shortage of land, just a shortage of access by those able to repopulate and work the land.
 
Old 02-17-2010, 06:22 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 12,896,672 times
Reputation: 8127
Quote:
Originally Posted by kharee View Post
I prefer to look at this situation as opportunity knocking not incentives to beg. (think welfare). There are thousand upon thousands of acres of farm land lying fallow across the nation as the rural population ages.

Out of the teeming millions in the economically challenged cities there are surely several hundred thousands who would relish living in 21st century rural America. I have roots in Paris,TN. A wonderful town. A good place to live.

History does not lie. New people will eventually claim any land the inhabitants of which go into decline. Or the land will just lie empty and fallow.
The people in Hazelton and many other dying towns now realize its the people which make the land productive while the land only gives opportunity to people. When the people go, productivity goes. Producing crops without producing children for the next generation is still failure.

Forty acres is but a pittance when you look at the values assigned to land in the county assessors record books. If land is not worked it is not producing any value. Hazelton is not productive, so it is dying.

Maybe Hazelton could send to Germany for emigrants. Maybe Hazelton could invite a church, Black or White to move its congregation to Hazelton. Land and the opportunity to grow on the land will attract the kind of people Hazelton needs. No matter how you cut it they need new people.

One man or a small church could make a tidy sum of money leasing land and raising fodder beets to make alcohol. There is an economic calculus which is also at play. Land is the key. There is no shortage of land, just a shortage of access by those able to repopulate and work the land.
This is the 2nd poster who has mentioned--"40 acres"--in their post.
These people recieved 2 free--lots--and extra cash after they purchased an additional lot.( a lot in a small town is not 40 acres?

kharee, where is all that farmland that is just laying idle and nobody farms it ?

I only know of 2 types of farm ground that exists if the owner no longer farms it. #1---it is rented to another farmer $$$$$$$
-----------#2--it is enrolled in the govt Conservation Reserve Program and the farmer recieves yearly rent from the govt $$$$$$

In neither case do I see the scenario where the elderly landowner is just gonna give away 40 acres at a time so some person from out of state can pursue their dream.
 
Old 02-17-2010, 07:54 AM
 
Location: E ND & NW MN
4,730 posts, read 9,081,168 times
Reputation: 3454
Quote:
Originally Posted by lelia6570 View Post
We moved to Grand Forks a year ago because my husband got a job with University of North Dakota. We've lived many places in the past few years (yeah for an economy like a bucking bronco!) and Grand Forks has been BY FAR the hardest place to make friends. We're very outgoing people with a background and values very similiar to the area, and we have no idea why we can't make friends. It's very strange to have lived here a year and still not have a single set of friends. We know a couple who is in the Air Force and they agree that it's the least friendly place they've ever lived as well !
Sorry to hear about your troubles. I moved up from Kentucky back in 1998 for my job and met my wife here who was from Minot. We live on the eastside (EGF) and we have most friends through work. We do have young kids now so that helps a lot. But yeah I have noticed that folks in this part of the country will give their shirt off their back to help you when needed (we have had our driveway snowblowed before when our neighbor knew we just had twin babies) but the tendency of many is to not to interfere with each other lives unless asked. Me being the outgoing one, have been the one to walk to people and say hello and say my name when walking the dog.
I wouldnt call anyone I met not friendly....but like my in-laws they dont like to interfere or intrude on someone else unless they feel they are welcomed to do so.

Have you or do you go to a gym or the YMCA. I found many new friends right away at Centre Court when I came to town. They are not close friends per se but people to hang out with every so often.

I hope it gets better....

Dan
 
Old 02-17-2010, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Southern New Mexico at the moment
39 posts, read 125,501 times
Reputation: 32
Hope this doesn't post twice, I'm having Server trouble!
I am a teacher and I've visited several small areas in ND, SD, MT, ID, and WY trying to find a small town with a smaller school district to relocate to. Unfortunately the attitude I've met with has been more "Welcome to our town, enjoy your coffee and keep driving". Instead of bragging about their town and trying to sell it they would rather let it die than welcome new people. I wear jeans and boots, not Rolex's and gold, I drive a big red Ford F150 four door truck that you can tell is a work truck, no Lexus here. And most of all I'm a teacher! They don't need teachers???
 
Old 02-17-2010, 09:13 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 12,896,672 times
Reputation: 8127
The reason many small town schools don't need school teachers is because of declining enrollment.

Many are faced with laying off school teachers as enrollment continues to decline.

That won't change until there are more students.
 
Old 02-17-2010, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Spots Wyoming
18,696 posts, read 35,410,165 times
Reputation: 2147483647
I'm not from there, but I do live in a small town and can explain some of this attitude. Also, I was born and raised in a small town.

People work hard all their life and they finally become comfortable. If not comfortable, at least, set in their ways. They like the way things are and they despise change. They like the fact that there is an open field outside their window. They don't want a new sub-division built there. Neither would you once you were settled.

It's human nature to buy land and say, "What a view". Only to have somebody build in the middle of the view next year. But hey, you did that last year and ruined the view of somebody else.

They also don't like when people move in and say, "The way we did it back home was to....." Their thought is, then why did you leave? You left and came here because you liked what you saw. So now that you are here, don't try to change it. Don't move in here and then say, "You shouldn't be allowed to park your boat in the driveway. You need to paint your fence. You need leash laws. All houses should be earth tones. The city needs to pave all of these streets. Kids shouldn't play baseball in that field. The city needs better lighting. We need more nightlife around here. The bars shouldn't be open on Sunday." and I could go on. You moved there because you liked the area. Why are you trying to change everything?

Sure, adding a stoplight might be needed for safety.

But that's what the old timers are looking at when you come to town and they have an attitude. Once they realize that you are not a threat and that you are going to blend in to the way things are and not try and change them. You'll see that attitude fade.

Keep saying, "Where I come from, we..." or keep being a threat. They'll keep the attitude.

Just my opinion. I moved into a town of 701 people. Within a month I'd met most everybody. I don't see any kind of attitude now, but I did when I first got here.
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Old 02-17-2010, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
85 posts, read 157,370 times
Reputation: 97
Do onto others as you would have done onto you.

A simple saying, and a good way to live life.

Seems to me like the folks in ND didn't give the new people much of a chance. Especially when consider that they were taking advantage of an invitation from the town to move to the town.
 
Old 02-17-2010, 05:38 PM
 
Location: IN
20,164 posts, read 34,473,831 times
Reputation: 12507
Quote:
Originally Posted by George Steinkrueger View Post
Having lived in a smaller county here in Oklahoma, I can say that I knew a fellow who was from Seattle, and he stood out and gained a reputation as the local ******. Every shyster within 50 miles knew who would be conned. I grew up in a big city, but at least I knew enough to keep my mouth shut and my ears open and blend....

Having said that, and having read the article, and knowing that the Oklahoma economy is in the toilet, I am intrigued by the program. Are the cities in North Dakota still offering such incentives?

My wife and I have 9 kids, so we would be instant populators.....
The rural areas in the Upper Midwest much prefer a statist existence with little change in routine as well as suspicion of outsiders. (This is also the case with other very rural parts of the country). It is also the oldest area of the country in the rural counties as nearly every single younger person moves to an urban area for employment after they graduate college.
 
Old 02-17-2010, 10:22 PM
 
Location: Valley City, ND
625 posts, read 1,606,434 times
Reputation: 527
Most places the 'Golden Rule' still applies. Treat everyone the way you want to be treated.

And if you go in with an 'attitude', you will most likely have a much harder time being accepted.
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