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Old 06-02-2014, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
29,636 posts, read 65,746,278 times
Reputation: 15129

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My dear Gypsy, you are trying to take more of a nuanced approach in your perspective of the region, but what an area like NEPA, which was the butt of cruel jokes and developed an inferiority complex as a result, really needs is cheerleading.

All Pittsburgh did in the early-2000s was uptalk itself. Brag, brag, brag. "Hey, look at me! ME! ME! ME! Smell my farts!" Guess what? It worked. The New York Times, Washington Post, Economist, etc. all started blowing smoke up the Steel City's derriere in national publications, and that got people, including developers, in other places to take notice and check us out. Now our unemployment rate is around 5% (near full employment); our economy is diversified and growing better than the economy in NEPA (despite our steel industry collapse happening a few decades more recently than NEPA's coal industry collapse); the population of Allegheny County is growing again while the population of the city has stabilized after generations of freefall; tourism is increasing; nearly 40% of our adults have at least a Bachelor's Degree; we're being considered to host important summits and conferences; etc.

Scranton/Wilkes-Barre needs to do the same. The metro area has to start positioning itself better to outsiders, and that can only begin by first convincing more NATIVES to become brand ambassadors of the region.

"I AM SCRANTON! HEAR ME ROAR!"

I've said this many times before on this sub-forum, and I'll say it again. In high school did people naturally gravitate towards the attractive jocks and cheerleaders who oozed charisma, confidence, and idealism, or did they gravitate towards the outcasts who festered and stewed within a "woe is me" mentality? Nobody will want to invest in an area that doesn't believe in itself, and that's the case right now with Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. At best the metro area has a very small (too small, quite frankly) crowd of cheerleaders (10%); a much louder (yet also small) group of malcontents (i.e. "Legion of Doomers"/10%); and, finally, roughly 80% of the populace that could take or leave NEPA---it doesn't make them happy or unhappy to live there, and they just go about their daily routines shrugging their shoulders complacently. We need to figure out how to better mobilize more of that 80% and encourage them to shout "I LOVE NEPA, AND HERE'S WHY!!!" from the highest hilltops to overpower the malcontents.

A lot of people made fun of and mocked Mayor Leighton in Wilkes-Barre for his "I BELIEVE" public relations campaign in the early-2000s. He actually "got it", though, realizing that in order for the city to ever revitalize itself he had to mobilize residents of the Diamond City to believe in its eventual recovery first instead of skeptically ballyhooing and negatively bloviating about everything.

Negativism may be infectious, my dear Gypsy, but positivism is contagious. Negative people infect other negative people and paralyze their ability to dream, believe, or encourage. Positive people inject enthusiasm, zeal, and happiness in all of those they touch. In this superficial era of reality television, scantily-clad pop icons, and a very fickle American public that is always looking for "the next best thing" people in Scranton/Wilkes-Barre need to mobilize and convince them that, yes, THIS REGION has what it takes to be something special and wonderful, and, yes, they, too, should check it out!
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Old 06-02-2014, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Location: Location
6,232 posts, read 7,425,839 times
Reputation: 17899
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
My dear Gypsy, you are trying to take more of a nuanced approach in your perspective of the region, but what an area like NEPA, which was the butt of cruel jokes and developed an inferiority complex as a result, really needs is cheerleading.

All Pittsburgh did in the early-2000s was uptalk itself. Brag, brag, brag. "Hey, look at me! ME! ME! ME! Smell my farts!" Guess what? It worked. The New York Times, Washington Post, Economist, etc. all started blowing smoke up the Steel City's derriere in national publications, and that got people, including developers, in other places to take notice and check us out. Now our unemployment rate is around 5% (near full employment); our economy is diversified and growing better than the economy in NEPA (despite our steel industry collapse happening a few decades more recently than NEPA's coal industry collapse); the population of Allegheny County is growing again while the population of the city has stabilized after generations of freefall; tourism is increasing; nearly 40% of our adults have at least a Bachelor's Degree; we're being considered to host important summits and conferences; etc.

Scranton/Wilkes-Barre needs to do the same. The metro area has to start positioning itself better to outsiders, and that can only begin by first convincing more NATIVES to become brand ambassadors of the region.

"I AM SCRANTON! HEAR ME ROAR!"

I've said this many times before on this sub-forum, and I'll say it again. In high school did people naturally gravitate towards the attractive jocks and cheerleaders who oozed charisma, confidence, and idealism, or did they gravitate towards the outcasts who festered and stewed within a "woe is me" mentality? Nobody will want to invest in an area that doesn't believe in itself, and that's the case right now with Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. At best the metro area has a very small (too small, quite frankly) crowd of cheerleaders (10%); a much louder (yet also small) group of malcontents (i.e. "Legion of Doomers"/10%); and, finally, roughly 80% of the populace that could take or leave NEPA---it doesn't make them happy or unhappy to live there, and they just go about their daily routines shrugging their shoulders complacently. We need to figure out how to better mobilize more of that 80% and encourage them to shout "I LOVE NEPA, AND HERE'S WHY!!!" from the highest hilltops to overpower the malcontents.

A lot of people made fun of and mocked Mayor Leighton in Wilkes-Barre for his "I BELIEVE" public relations campaign in the early-2000s. He actually "got it", though, realizing that in order for the city to ever revitalize itself he had to mobilize residents of the Diamond City to believe in its eventual recovery first instead of skeptically ballyhooing and negatively bloviating about everything.

Negativism may be infectious, my dear Gypsy, but positivism is contagious. Negative people infect other negative people and paralyze their ability to dream, believe, or encourage. Positive people inject enthusiasm, zeal, and happiness in all of those they touch. In this superficial era of reality television, scantily-clad pop icons, and a very fickle American public that is always looking for "the next best thing" people in Scranton/Wilkes-Barre need to mobilize and convince them that, yes, THIS REGION has what it takes to be something special and wonderful, and, yes, they, too, should check it out!

I never called you a troll. Ever.

For today, however, I will call you a Boob. Of the first order. You are criticizing me and yet, and yet!, my post about the area was nothing but positive! WTH do you think I was talking about when I said all those POSITIVE things about NEPA? WHAT?

I don't know what I said in that post that could possibly be construed as negative, except for the fact that public transportation stinks. I thought I painted a pretty damned wonderful picture of what life could be like - if not everywhere in NEPA, at least on the West Side and general surrounds. And I asked that people chime in with what they enjoyed in their own areas.

I don't think it's a good idea to refer to me as "my dear Gypsy" while at the same time totally disregarding the content and the intent of my very positive "check it out" post. If you feel you were unfairly lumped in with the posters you referenced, then maybe you should check back on some of the posts that were less than flattering to the area.

Why do you think that everyone who disagrees with you is rude? I never was rude to you. Well, there was that once...

Not one person on these boards ever told you that you didn't have some good ideas about bringing about change. Not one. But instead of staying and attempting to bring your ideas to fruition, you took off. And while you have talked for years about returning "to help my sister care for our parents as they age" (yes, you've said it so often I can quote it verbatim), you've yet to do so.

Personally, I'd like to see you come back and do what you feel you can. But until you do, it's just bloviating. Luv ya, babe.
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Old 06-02-2014, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
13,239 posts, read 10,635,262 times
Reputation: 9421
Quote:
Originally Posted by theatergypsy View Post
Not one person on these boards ever told you that you didn't have some good ideas about bringing about change. Not one.
Actually I just did! But it wasn't so much as it wasn't a good idea; but courting business should be done with caution. I just don't think that we always win.

But I will try to think more positive for the rest of the day!
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Old 06-02-2014, 04:11 PM
 
Location: somewhere flat
1,321 posts, read 1,117,259 times
Reputation: 3869
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
My dear Gypsy, you are trying to take more of a nuanced approach in your perspective of the region, but what an area like NEPA, which was the butt of cruel jokes and developed an inferiority complex as a result, really needs is cheerleading.

All Pittsburgh did in the early-2000s was uptalk itself. Brag, brag, brag. "Hey, look at me! ME! ME! ME! Smell my farts!" Guess what? It worked. The New York Times, Washington Post, Economist, etc. all started blowing smoke up the Steel City's derriere in national publications, and that got people, including developers, in other places to take notice and check us out. Now our unemployment rate is around 5% (near full employment); our economy is diversified and growing better than the economy in NEPA (despite our steel industry collapse happening a few decades more recently than NEPA's coal industry collapse); the population of Allegheny County is growing again while the population of the city has stabilized after generations of freefall; tourism is increasing; nearly 40% of our adults have at least a Bachelor's Degree; we're being considered to host important summits and conferences; etc.

Scranton/Wilkes-Barre needs to do the same. The metro area has to start positioning itself better to outsiders, and that can only begin by first convincing more NATIVES to become brand ambassadors of the region.

"I AM SCRANTON! HEAR ME ROAR!"

I've said this many times before on this sub-forum, and I'll say it again. In high school did people naturally gravitate towards the attractive jocks and cheerleaders who oozed charisma, confidence, and idealism, or did they gravitate towards the outcasts who festered and stewed within a "woe is me" mentality? Nobody will want to invest in an area that doesn't believe in itself, and that's the case right now with Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. At best the metro area has a very small (too small, quite frankly) crowd of cheerleaders (10%); a much louder (yet also small) group of malcontents (i.e. "Legion of Doomers"/10%); and, finally, roughly 80% of the populace that could take or leave NEPA---it doesn't make them happy or unhappy to live there, and they just go about their daily routines shrugging their shoulders complacently. We need to figure out how to better mobilize more of that 80% and encourage them to shout "I LOVE NEPA, AND HERE'S WHY!!!" from the highest hilltops to overpower the malcontents.

A lot of people made fun of and mocked Mayor Leighton in Wilkes-Barre for his "I BELIEVE" public relations campaign in the early-2000s. He actually "got it", though, realizing that in order for the city to ever revitalize itself he had to mobilize residents of the Diamond City to believe in its eventual recovery first instead of skeptically ballyhooing and negatively bloviating about everything.

Negativism may be infectious, my dear Gypsy, but positivism is contagious. Negative people infect other negative people and paralyze their ability to dream, believe, or encourage. Positive people inject enthusiasm, zeal, and happiness in all of those they touch. In this superficial era of reality television, scantily-clad pop icons, and a very fickle American public that is always looking for "the next best thing" people in Scranton/Wilkes-Barre need to mobilize and convince them that, yes, THIS REGION has what it takes to be something special and wonderful, and, yes, they, too, should check it out!


How exactly can a xenophobic area like Scranton Wilkes-Barre "position itself better to outsiders" when they clearly don't want to like "outsiders"?

They mock positive people. If you "like" that area, in there mind; you must be some kind of fool.

Areas have karma. Scranton - Wilkes-Barre appears to be getting theirs.

First they sold their souls to the coal industry. Now, people are embracing fracking.

Have they thought about education? ...nah...that's for sissies.

I lived in Kingston for a year and a half. Not a bad place, but not terribly welcoming and, for an area that is touted as up-market, the schools were terrible.

You get what you give. And NEPA gives nothing.
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Old 06-02-2014, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
22,815 posts, read 21,862,642 times
Reputation: 27880
Lets get one thing straight SoulJourn, the people who "sold their soul" to the coal industry moved to the area to do it.
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Old 06-02-2014, 09:47 PM
 
Location: somewhere flat
1,321 posts, read 1,117,259 times
Reputation: 3869
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
Lets get one thing straight SoulJourn, the people who "sold their soul" to the coal industry moved to the area to do it.


Yeah, I know. That's what makes is so perplexing.
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Old 06-03-2014, 02:01 AM
 
37,072 posts, read 38,398,688 times
Reputation: 14841
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoulJourn View Post
Yeah, I know. That's what makes is so perplexing.
It's called surviving. Do you find it perplexing they would work in sweatshops in NYC or other cities? Do you find it perplexing they would work on RR's with a pick and shovel for 12 hours a day? Do you find it perplexing they would work in steel mills? What exactly do you find perplexing about wanting to provide for your family?

Immigrants came to this country for jobs and coal mining was one of them. My Great Grandfather came here and worked in the mines briefly. Being the smart man that he was he realized it was a dead end, literally. He started a business delivering coal and other products. The coal industry provided food and clothing for his kids and their kids. Today I and two other fourth generation offspring make a very good living in that industry, I personally do it from behind a keyboard. Of course numerous relatives have gone onto higher education and other business's. If you want to call that selling your soul so be it but the coal industry was the foundation for the success of my family. My Grandmother told me stories of huddling around a coal stove with the kids in the dead of winter, there isn't anyone huddling around anything now. Quite frankly your comment is highly insulting to me and anyone else that has their roots in the coal industry.
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Old 06-03-2014, 06:51 AM
 
53 posts, read 54,256 times
Reputation: 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
It's called surviving. Do you find it perplexing they would work in sweatshops in NYC or other cities? Do you find it perplexing they would work on RR's with a pick and shovel for 12 hours a day? Do you find it perplexing they would work in steel mills? What exactly do you find perplexing about wanting to provide for your family?

Immigrants came to this country for jobs and coal mining was one of them. My Great Grandfather came here and worked in the mines briefly. Being the smart man that he was he realized it was a dead end, literally. He started a business delivering coal and other products. The coal industry provided food and clothing for his kids and their kids. Today I and two other fourth generation offspring make a very good living in that industry, I personally do it from behind a keyboard. Of course numerous relatives have gone onto higher education and other business's. If you want to call that selling your soul so be it but the coal industry was the foundation for the success of my family. My Grandmother told me stories of huddling around a coal stove with the kids in the dead of winter, there isn't anyone huddling around anything now. Quite frankly your comment is highly insulting to me and anyone else that has their roots in the coal industry.
Good post. Both my grandfathers were coal miners. Conditions were not good in the countries were they came from otherwise they wouldn't have chosen to be coal miners that's for sure. One grandfather was able to purchase a farm after several years of working in the mines and that's were I currently reside.

SoulJourn: As far as gas drilling Scranton and Wilkes-Bare have nothing to do with that. lol and the farmers and landowners who are benefiting from gas drilling have little to do with Scranton and Wilkes- Barre. And I do say benefiting as I drive around Susquehanna county I see lots of farm buildings and houses that have been repaired and people are clearly benefiting from the lease money and royalties and the vast majority have not had any water problems. Methane in well water has always been an issue so it's not even clear gas drilling has caused any new problems. In contrast drive around New York state and see the all the dilapidated farms, it's really depressing. It's a shame New York state couldn't care less about it's farmers. Not only the farms but many towns and cities like Binghamton are depressing. Except for around the Finger Lakes maybe, it seems New York doesn't care about anything that's not near NYC.
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