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Northeastern Pennsylvania Scranton, Wilkes-Barre, Pocono area
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Old 08-20-2016, 01:17 PM
 
13 posts, read 12,281 times
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I've lived in a bunch of cities, primarily east coast and central south; now I'm living in Cincinnati and really liking it. It's badly underrated... Anyway I remain curious about other places. Lately we've had a return of summer dog days here in late July and August 2016, and I've been looking for the closest places that have cooler temps for a respite. Central and Northeastern PA win. I've spent time in Allentown and it really was cooler.

I foresee a big migration from the northeast and the southwest if weather and income patterns don't change. They will be moving to inland cities looking for development potential (and they will be eyeing places like Cincinnati, near and central midwest). I've been street viewing Scranton and Central Pa too - Altoona, Johnstown, State College.

I'm most drawn to Scranton because of its pop density and stock of historic architecture, plus they are an old stronghold for European ethnic groups like Polish, German, Italian and Irish. But those central PA towns I mentioned, and the lay of the land are really charming visually.

Any thoughts from any of you? Could a near senior bachelor move to Scranton and live a low cost high quality bohemian/professional life style there now? Is it changing for the better? How do the "townspeople" react to an older single guy; is it a good place for bachelor culture? - by that I mean single and married men enjoying platonic company of other men. I know they are more conservative and Catholic there, but I tend to disappoint people who are looking for gossip. There was a significant migration to the Lehigh Valley when I was there in 1997. I called them NYC refugees but really they were from all over. Is a similar thing going on in Scranton now?

Last edited by thomasarick; 08-20-2016 at 01:30 PM..
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Old 08-21-2016, 11:18 AM
 
13 posts, read 12,281 times
Reputation: 31
I need to qualify "bachelor culture" - I didn't mean this would be exclusive to women. I avoid gay and straight "meat markets". I'm also concerned about age integration. Would an older single guy stick out like a sore thumb in a lot of venues? Age integration as well as sexual integration is pretty good in so-called conservative Cincinnati.
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Old 08-29-2016, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Cleveland Heights, OH
423 posts, read 509,105 times
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Wow, 130 views and no replies. What, is Scranton made up of only introverts? I'm also curious about your question.
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Old 08-29-2016, 03:48 PM
 
Location: Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA
3,086 posts, read 2,486,751 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bilbono View Post
Wow, 130 views and no replies. What, is Scranton made up of only introverts? I'm also curious about your question.
LOL I'd like to help but as a 56 year old married guy who lives 50 miles from Scranton and has never been to Cincinnati for comparison, I really can't speak to the "quasi urban experience" of that depressed area.


Although older single guys are a thing now, with the high divorce rate and all, so I'm sure there are lots of bike rallies and church picnics to blend in and find older single women at.
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Old 08-29-2016, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
29,084 posts, read 61,248,991 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bilbono View Post
Wow, 130 views and no replies. What, is Scranton made up of only introverts? I'm also curious about your question.
This sub-forum is pretty much dead anymore.

I wouldn't consider any part of PA to offer a hip/quirky/urban experience, sadly. Urban sprawl ravaged the region for decades to the point where the neighborhoods that SHOULD be trendy with today's Millennial stalwarts still aren't because, for whatever reason, the rush from the suburbs back into the central cities that's been experienced in many other metropolitan areas still hasn't happened in NEPA. People still would rather buy a suburban McMansion on a cul-de-sac than take a chance on an iffy city neighborhood.

Pittston, actually, has been experiencing a revival over the past five years, and it has a great location equidistant to Scranton or Wilkes-Barre. I know the NEPA Rainbow Alliance (LGBT community) relocated its headquarters to Pittston, and when I resided there it seemed like most people were at least socially moderate. The town is overwhelmingly a Democratic stronghold. The problem? So much of the town's history was shamefully bulldozed in the '80's-'00's that it's hard to really view the large strides it has taken as being that large of a victory when handsomely-restored buildings are still bookended by vacant lots---"gap teeth" in the urban fabric.

Otherwise most of the "old bones" communities in the region that have the potential for walkability sit as ugly blighted messes---Nanticoke, Plymouth, Edwardsville, Carbondale, Dupont, Avoca, Duryea, etc. Scranton has some of that quasi-urbanity going on that the OP seeks, especially in the Hill Section and Green Ridge, both of which are "old money" neighborhoods. The Hill Section feels livelier and more youthful because it's adjacent to the campus of the University of Scranton, along with Lackawanna College, and The Commonwealth Medical College. Green Ridge feels more "fuddy-duddy", if you will. Green Ridge feels like a streetcar suburb. The Hill Section feels better integrated with Downtown.

Downtown Wilkes-Barre has been attempting to revitalize itself for many years with some success. In my opinion even though Wilkes-Barre has a MUCH smaller population than Scranton it feels much more urban because its city limits are tiny, which makes its population density relatively high whereas Scranton has a lot more spread out neighborhoods. The housing stock in Wilkes-Barre is a HUGE detractor, though, unfortunately, because even though smaller houses in urban areas are in fashion right now the old miner's homes in Wilkes-Barre are largely aesthetically unappealing and outdated. Scranton has a better housing stock overall, but the larger lot sizes make it feel less urban to me.

Scranton has a 2013 population of 76,089 in 25.23 square miles for a population density of 3,016 people per square mile.

Wilkes-Barre has a 2013 population of 41,200 in 6.9 square miles for a population density of 5,971 people per square mile.

Pittston has a 2010 population of 7,739 in 1.6 square miles for a population density of 4,837 people per square mile.
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Old 08-31-2016, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Williamsport PA
108 posts, read 159,848 times
Reputation: 99
The Poconos can be cooler than the rest of Pennsylvania. Nothing in Pennsylvania could be described as bohemian, but New Hope PA comes pretty close with its art community.

The art community in Williamsport PA has improved considerably with the Pajama Factory, an old clothing factory converted into artist studios and lofts. It is like a little slice of Brooklyn! But otherwise that city is very conservative and culturally dead.

New Hope PA is probably exactly what you are looking for but the cost of living there is very high. You often see expensive sports cars on the streets of New Hope.
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Old 08-31-2016, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Location: Location
5,676 posts, read 6,205,161 times
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I, too, have been waiting for someone to answer the OP. Since it doesn't seem like anyone is prepared to respond as to a 'low cost, high quality, bohemian..." life style, I suggest thomasarick take a vacation and come to Scranton for a week or so.

Explore the neighborhoods, the bars, the art galleries, the churches. Check out the state parks, the golf courses, and be sure that the medical facilities are up to your standards. (They are to mine) Look at the surrounding smaller towns that ring the city. See if you feel any sort of connection.

I'm not sure if you want to find cooler temps but I can tell you that this Summer has been one of the warmest on record for the area and we've been sweltering with the best of them.

I can't answer the question of whether age-integration would be a factor. If I'm reading between the lines correctly, it sounds like you want to know if the young(er) women would be interested in a more mature escort. Who knows? May be a question that would be answered if you did the road trip.

I don't live in Scranton, although I once did, but since you aren't getting much in the way of response, I offer my POV. While I still live in the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre "metroplex", I wish more people who are thinking of moving here would take the time to look around at the smaller communities that are safe and quiet for living but only a short walk to the livelier entertainment spots.
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Old 09-02-2016, 01:15 AM
 
30 posts, read 14,473 times
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I do live in scranton, west scranton, all my life actually. What specifically do you want to know? Most of the downtown bars/clubs are not age diverse. They're mostly college age patrons. Outlying bars are more older folks. The one gay bar/club (12 Penny) is actually in Moosic, and has a diverse age range, split between younger in the dance club section, and mixed in the bar areas.
Large sections of the city are now full of low income blacks/hispanics transplanted from ny/nj/south america. I wouldn't say we're welcoming to new faces at all anymore, if we ever were. The only neighbors we speak to are the originals still here from the old guard. And I wouldn't say we're an old stronghold anymore. Those neighborhoods died out with the last of the old grandparents, and are now taken over by out of state slumlords renting to all the new ny/nj/south american transplants.
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Old 09-04-2016, 11:10 AM
 
3,789 posts, read 4,317,899 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nepa76 View Post
I do live in scranton, west scranton, all my life actually. What specifically do you want to know? Most of the downtown bars/clubs are not age diverse. They're mostly college age patrons. Outlying bars are more older folks. The one gay bar/club (12 Penny) is actually in Moosic, and has a diverse age range, split between younger in the dance club section, and mixed in the bar areas.
Large sections of the city are now full of low income blacks/hispanics transplanted from ny/nj/south america. I wouldn't say we're welcoming to new faces at all anymore, if we ever were. The only neighbors we speak to are the originals still here from the old guard. And I wouldn't say we're an old stronghold anymore. Those neighborhoods died out with the last of the old grandparents, and are now taken over by out of state slumlords renting to all the new ny/nj/south american transplants.
those coming from other areas tend to be more welcoming and quasi urban--tis the died in wool locals that are dragging this area further down---most of the slum lords in my experience tend to be greedy locals that ignore their properties in my experience--large sections of diversity are still a myth
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Old 09-04-2016, 04:20 PM
 
30 posts, read 14,473 times
Reputation: 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by auntieannie68 View Post
those coming from other areas tend to be more welcoming and quasi urban--tis the died in wool locals that are dragging this area further down---most of the slum lords in my experience tend to be greedy locals that ignore their properties in my experience--large sections of diversity are still a myth
I didn't say diversity wasn't a myth. The large areas, south side, west side, etc, where the problems are are concentrations of minorities, when a few move in they're quickly followed by more of the same race until entire blocks are switched over, so an all black, or all Hispanic block isn't diverse, it's a concentration.

All of the homes that were converted into low income apartments in my neighborhood are not owned by greedy locals, they're owned by out of state slumlords, mainly residing in NY, NJ, or Delaware. Just was warned by my longtime neighbor today that a member of the bloods gang has just moved in to a low income black rental at the end of my block. Word is he just got paroled from prison. This is coming from her son who works as a corrections officer. So this gang banger is now just a few doors down living directly across the street from a drug dealing shop fronted as a hair cutting shop.

It's not those of us who've lived here all our lives that are dragging the area down, it's the low income trash from NY and NJ, and other countries, that are dragging the area down into ghettos. When you see these properties crumbling and tenants flipping monthly there's nothing actual home owners can do except report them to the city gov. There are currently three houses on my street alone that are now condemned and and slated for tearing down because the landlord's allowed renters to literally destroy the places. I spoke to a city inspector that was checking on the abandoned house across the street from my house a few weeks ago and all three condemned houses are owned by new Yorkers who have not responded to claims sent by the city. That's a drain on the city, not long time residents.
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