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Old 08-16-2010, 02:46 PM
 
10,596 posts, read 12,092,834 times
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No help for you but I would be furious.

I know that when I buy a house next time, I won't even LOOK at a house that has cats. I'm allergic anyway but their urine "issues" are just the worst. Far worse than a dog.
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Old 08-16-2010, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Orange, California
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You might start with replacing the carpets, which is only relatively inexpensive in the scheme of things. Sometimes, that can solve the problem, although sometimes the problem is more serious and the odor seeps into the subflooring. Uggh.

This whole thing makes me scratch my head at why some landlords are amenable to renting their houses/townhouses/condos to cat owners, but not dog owners. IMO, cats are much more destructive to a home than dogs, primarily because of the urine issue.
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Old 08-16-2010, 08:33 PM
 
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To the OP--one thing I was told is that you have to use large amounts of Nature's Remedy and let it soak in rather than mop it up with a paper towel (which I was doing). Unfortunately, this could ruin the floor, but if you think it's already ruined and has to be replaced, you may have nothing to lose by trying this (other than the cost of the NR and your time).

Goozer, I think the reason is that relatively few cats have this problem. I've had several over many years, and fostered many more. Only my current foster kitty, who has significant kidney problems, has ever urinated outside the box--and fortunately, this is limited to rare occasions, in a small area. I'm not trying to diminish how awful the problem is when it does happen, just trying to explain why landlords/ladies have the rules they have.

Dog waste can be as bad as cat waste.

Some dogs are every bit as destructive as cats who urinate everywhere, and cats are never more than 25 lbs, whereas dogs can get much bigger. I've looked at many houses where the hardwood or bamboo floors were damaged ruined by deep, large dog scratches. And bear in mind that many houses and apartments you see have already been repaired partially (e.g., where dogs may have scratched walls).

On the other hand, I had to rent a previous residence when it didn't sell, and the tenants were far more destructive (and inconsiderate) than their little dog.

Also, landlord/lady decisions may have nothing to do with litter box problems but instead they believe that cats are usually quiet and hide if afraid, whereas dogs' barking (and possibly threatening visitors) can irritate neighbors, or provide a basis for a lawsuit.
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Old 08-16-2010, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, VA
11,368 posts, read 20,163,370 times
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Sadly, it's the people that had the cats that were irresponsible - I had a cat for 25 yrs. and she never went outside her litter box. Male cats that aren't fixed can and do spray and cats that have dirty litter box(es), not enough boxes, etc. don't want to go in them for obvious reasons. If cats do urinate on the floors, it usually will involve at the minimum sanding down wood floors, or if carpeted, removing the carpet and drying to repair the subfloor. Shame on the the owners who obviously didn't care for their cats or it never would have happened in the first place, just because a prior owner had cat(s) doesn't mean there are problems but those kinds of people perpetuate it.

Sorry you've had such problems.
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Old 08-16-2010, 08:47 PM
 
Location: Northwestern VA
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People don't have to disclose that their cats peed where they weren't supposed to. You're bothered by the odor, and there are other methods available to remove the odor that don't required replacing subflooring. It's not a material defect affecting the integrity of the structure. Out of curiousity, where were the cats when you went to preview, inspect, and do final walk through?

Quote:
Originally Posted by VicodinES View Post
[SIZE=2]I bought a house last fall. The previous owner had cats. This summer, the area above the garage(living room) has started to smell horribly of cat urine, due to the garage being heated which is making the once dormant smell unbearable.
The previous owner didn't disclose that her cats had urinated on the floors. It's goign to cost around 2 grand to rip out the flooring and subfloor and replace it. I've already tried using gallons of Natures Miracle, and it helps slightly, but not much.
Is there any way to go after the previous owner for not disclosing the fact that she let her cats urinate on the floor, or is this one of those things that falls under the buyer beware dept? I remember my realtor saying that they had to disclose if they knew about a documented foundation issue, but that was it.
[/SIZE]
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Old 08-17-2010, 07:26 AM
 
15 posts, read 43,931 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tish Thompson View Post
People don't have to disclose that their cats peed where they weren't supposed to. You're bothered by the odor, and there are other methods available to remove the odor that don't required replacing subflooring. It's not a material defect affecting the integrity of the structure. Out of curiousity, where were the cats when you went to preview, inspect, and do final walk through?
I don't recall ever seeing the cats when we looked at the house initially, and the house was empty when we did the inspection and the final walk-through. There was a litter box and a cat hutch when we looked at it.

What other methods are there? I've talked to two different cleaning companies, and both of them have suggested that we take up the hardwood flooring and the sub-floor to get rid of the smell. Both of them said that they do not do this kind of work, so I don't think that they were trying to get more money out of us. I'm open to any and all suggestions at this point. Thanks.
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Old 08-17-2010, 07:35 AM
 
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To the OP--one thing I was told is that you have to use large amounts of Nature's Remedy and let it soak in rather than mop it up with a paper towel (which I was doing). Unfortunately, this could ruin the floor, but if you think it's already ruined and has to be replaced, you may have nothing to lose by trying this (other than the cost of the NR and your time).

Be careful about soaking anything into the subfloor. You will cause mold and mildew problems on top of the cat odor.

Although expensive, the best solution is to replace the subfloor and I would check the baseboards.
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Old 08-18-2010, 01:31 AM
TPL
 
Location: Washington, D.C.
136 posts, read 274,579 times
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Even though this isn't the reason for why my family put in brand new wood flooring during our renovation a few years back (It replaced our original carpeting and linoleum), it sure has turned out to be an amazingly positive benefit since we now have three dogs and a cat. We just buy area rugs, and smaller foot rugs. When the foot rugs get a wet spot, we just toss them into the washing machine. The area rugs we can clean from both sides, and we sometimes will place them on the deck and steam-clean them. When they get to the point where that's not enough however, we just swap them for new ones.
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Old 08-18-2010, 04:47 AM
 
10,596 posts, read 12,092,834 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TPL View Post
Even though this isn't the reason for why my family put in brand new wood flooring during our renovation a few years back (It replaced our original carpeting and linoleum), it sure has turned out to be an amazingly positive benefit since we now have three dogs and a cat. We just buy area rugs, and smaller foot rugs. When the foot rugs get a wet spot, we just toss them into the washing machine. The area rugs we can clean from both sides, and we sometimes will place them on the deck and steam-clean them. When they get to the point where that's not enough however, we just swap them for new ones.
I did the same thing many years ago. When it was time for new carpet, I was SHOCKED at the price of good carpet and padding. Plus, I always have dogs and who wants to shell out all that money and then they have an accident. Plus, our backyard always seems muddy.

I opted to have hardwood installed all over the house. Best decision I ever made. Same as you, we just replace little rugs now and again. I have an area rug in my family room that can be well cleaned because we can pick it up and let it dry on the deck.

If the OP can afford it, I would highly recommend removal of everything and have hardwood installed.
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Old 08-18-2010, 09:12 AM
 
61 posts, read 138,938 times
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I have use the following for cat urine and works pretty well Anti-Icky-Poo Cat and Dog Urine Odor Removal - Welcome

Not sure on how bad you have it but if in carpets and matting...probably have to replace carpeting
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