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Old 02-25-2011, 12:36 PM
 
493 posts, read 1,010,821 times
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My subdivision is having a problem with certain dog owners. With one exception, we don't know who they are.

Problem #1:
We have special boxes where people can grab a bag and dispose of the used ones in the attached compartment. Lately, when they are full, some people will leave their used bags on the ground next to the box. I think the company that owns the boxes comes 2x a week to pick up the bags; sometimes it has missed a pick-up day. Obviously, this contract cost is a part of our 4x-a-year HOA assessment.

Problem #2:
Some annoying pet owners do not clean up after their dogs, and not only do they let them do their business on common ground, some residents have spotted an individual using their lawns!

A warning letter from the HOA isn't going to change their behavior, I fear.
Spotting a pet owner not cleaning up has led some of us to kindly say "Have you run out of bags? I have an extra one --here, use this." That's worked -- for that one time. "Confronting" someone will lead to aggressive behavior. (Let's not even get to the point of someone taking revenge by redepositing the poop at the dog owner's front steps or on his/her car, OK?)

If you've been in this situation, what's been done to help change people's behavior?
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Old 02-25-2011, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 25,830,715 times
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You'll find some great tips here: Tip of the Day~~April 27, 2010

Here's the solution that worked for us:

We asked the local kids to write chalk messages on the sidewalk next to our yard. "Please don't let your dog poop here" is surprisingly effective when written in kids hand writing. We have the kids update it fairly often, which I think helps too. In my neighborhood most people are considerate enough not to let their dogs use an area where kids regularly play.

Some other good suggestions:

1. Change your fertilizer. Some animals react strongly to different smells. If you've been using organic fertilizers try using a chemical one for a short period and vice versa.

2. Change your watering times. Neighbors usually walk their dogs at the same time. If they see you out watering, they'll move on. Same thing if the sprinklers are already going. Even having the lawn wet may deter the animal.

3. Post a sign saying "Poison Ivy" or "Danger, chemical used to treat lawn are dangerous to dogs."
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Old 02-25-2011, 01:13 PM
 
Location: In the woods
3,315 posts, read 8,801,828 times
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I second the idea about using some kind of deterrent for the dog. I heard that red pepper + ammonia works.

Or a security camera aimed at your front lawn. I think there are wireless ones for about $100.

Or just act kind of crazy. If you see them out there doing their business, walk out and say, "Excuse me. Do you mind getting your dog out of my yard." Just be very firm about it. No cuss words yet.

I did this once when my neighbor's dog peed on my front lawn. They didn't know that I was on my front porch. They haven't done it since.
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Old 02-25-2011, 01:32 PM
 
5,121 posts, read 5,562,820 times
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I was told that ammonia doesn't work because there is ammonia in urine and dogs love to mark over other dogs "marks" (if you know what I mean). Not sure if it's true, but dog book recommend not cleaning up after a puppy with an ammonia-based product.

As for Problem #1, it sounds like you might need a bigger box for people to dispose of waste. I am not sure if that's really "doable" but if things are overflowing, that sounds like a solution to me. Either that or have more pickups (but that would probably be more expensive).

Problem #2 could be related to problem #1 to a lesser extent. If there is no place to put the waste, some people won't pick it up (why they wont' just bring it home and dispose of it, I don't know... but they won't). So maybe some of problem #2 can be solved with more boxes. (Is anyone else snickering at the unintended puns here?)

As for lazy, selfish people who don't pick up. I can't stand them either. As a dog owner who *does* pick up, I get sick of getting the stink eye from people that assume no dog owners pick up. The best thing to do is probably to just tell them. If you don't catch them, a camera (or a fake one which is cheaper) might do the trick.

You can report them to animal control I think. But be sure you report the right person. I had someone report me and my dogs once (even though I always pick up) and animal control showed up at my house. Luckily, I have a special doggie trash can I keep outside and it was kind of clear that my dogs were a bit on the too small side to make the mess the officer observed. (By the way, in that case it was a mess made by a dog--that was the same color as mine but about 50 pounds larger. That was allowed to run loose in the neighborhood--drove me nuts because people kept asking if my dog was loose and I kept thinking, "can't you see the difference? That dog is a huge, male golden lab and my dog is a little 40 pound female mutt!")
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Old 02-25-2011, 01:35 PM
 
Location: In the woods
3,315 posts, read 8,801,828 times
Reputation: 1510
Quote:
Originally Posted by jillabean View Post
I was told that ammonia doesn't work because there is ammonia in urine and dogs love to mark over other dogs "marks" (if you know what I mean). Not sure if it's true, but dog book recommend not cleaning up after a puppy with an ammonia-based product.
Hmmmm . . . maybe you're right. I heard this was good for critters though (i.e., possums, etc.)
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