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Old 03-23-2011, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
4,489 posts, read 9,563,765 times
Reputation: 3656

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Quote:
Originally Posted by gingerbreadgirl View Post
Look at DCDogFinders | The DC area's finest in-home puppy breeders

I don't know anything about them, but they sure have some cute puppies. It is not a rescue group, hopefully not a backyard breeder either. Most of their dogs are the 'hair' type of dogs, not the 'fur' types which might be better for your allergies. Maybe someone knows something about that group?
These guys are total backyard breeders. Actually, they're distributors of backyard breeders. They're breeding mixes without health testing. They "guarantee" health based on nothing--there are no xrays or cerf tests on file. They're breeding a half dozen different kind of mixes, which says they can't specialize in any of the dog breeds. None of the parents have titles in anything, none have been temperament tested, etc. What is the purpose of their breeding? WHY are they putting dog "A" with dog "B"? Because the puppies will look cute? Because someone came to them asking for a malti-poo? Or is it because dog "A" has great structure that will balance out with dog "B"s temperament, their drive is complimentary, and together the puppies show great promise?

What's the difference between them and any dog from a shelter? You're paying hundreds of dollars for an unknown mix of characteristics with no proof of health. Why not pay $20 and get the exact same mix of unknown characteristics from a shelter, save a life in the process, and prevent lining someone's pockets with money?

If you want to find a good breeder, start attending breed shows now. Start attending trials. Attend a poodle breed specialty. Go to a therapy dog event and talk to the poodle owners and see where their dog is from. Get recommendations for good breeders, and find out when one is planning a litter. Get on the wait list for a puppy, or talk to them about adopting a retired breeder.

Finally, make sure the disposition/energy level/etc of a poodle is something you really want. Just because they look nice and have the right fur doesn't mean they're going to fit in with your household. (For that reason, I'd recommend looking at an older mix so you can find one with the right energy levels)
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Old 03-23-2011, 08:37 AM
 
639 posts, read 1,149,211 times
Reputation: 207
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5stones View Post
OMG... everyone has a soapbox and not many with actual help!!

Yes dogs(pets) can be a GREAT way to help kids cope in this situation!
Also who said you shouldn't own a dog with kids under 10?? BS! She wasn't asking about Rotties or Pit Bulls for goodness sake! Dogs(pets) give kids a great sense of responsiblity etc...

So for the smaller type dog that is GREAt with kids and is considered "hypo allergenic" I would suggest...
1) Bedlington Terrier.... Bedlington Terrier Information and Pictures, Bedlington Terriers
although they are not MY favorite dog... In this situation I think they would be great.
They have an excellant temperment are very smart and easy to house train!...(also I perfer them "natural" and not trimed...but that is me!)


While yes, shelter dogs can be great and I too volunteer with ours. We are cautious with placing dogs in first time households with kids. Yes, we do get "surrenders" and those have been rasied around kids etc... but they get placed QUICKLY. Unforuntately MANY of our shelter friends have a bad history and they DO NOT make good pets for a family with small children. This OP wants a dog for her child to play with and hug etc....


Our dog (Brittany) is now 12 and he helped my Kids through many deployments... BTW they were 5 and 2 when we got him with #3 on the way....NEVER had any issues!!
I think the main concern here is for the welfare of the dog - someone shouldn't really get one if they have no idea whether their other half is on board with it; it will be the dog that suffers if he isn't, and that's not fair.
Take it easy
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Old 03-23-2011, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Brambleton, VA
2,187 posts, read 6,815,683 times
Reputation: 2161
Quote:
Originally Posted by HereinVA View Post
I've seen a few people suggest rescues, but I don't think a rescue would place a dog with the OP if they didn't feel assured that her Dh was 100% onboard with the idea. And from what the OP has said, it doesn't sound like he is. For rescues, the number one goal is to see the dog in a forever home, and if one of the family members doesn't like it, there's a much higher risk of the pet being returned.
If they were a foster family then it would be different scenario. Plus, they would have the added support of the other foster families. Before I worked with rescue, I was overwhelmed with our first dog. She was stubborn, hard to train, and couldn't seem to get the concept of housebreaking and was just destructive. There were many times that I just wanted to give up and send her back to the pound. If I had a special needs child in addition, that would have definitely happened. Luckily, I had the support of my dh to try some different approaches with her and we resolved everything but I sure would have loved to have the support from the rescue...it was nice just being able to voice my concerns and not feel judged about it. Because I was never the only one that had gone through something like that. I think that a dog would be great for the OP, but that she needs to have a support system in place for those high stress times...and a plan B just in case things don't work out. For the record, I think it is more traumatic to a child, especially a special needs child, to have a dog come into their house and then be returned because it was too chaotic. If a rescue will work with you on just having visits for a couple hours, and gradually going up to a day or two it would be such a great experience for the family to adjust.
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Old 03-23-2011, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
4,489 posts, read 9,563,765 times
Reputation: 3656
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5stones View Post
Yes dogs(pets) can be a GREAT way to help kids cope in this situation!
Also who said you shouldn't own a dog with kids under 10?? BS! She wasn't asking about Rotties or Pit Bulls for goodness sake! Dogs(pets) give kids a great sense of responsiblity etc...
Pitbulls are actually one of the best kid-friendly dogs. Seriously. They are dog aggressive, but they are absolutely not bred to be human aggressive--that would be a MAJOR liability in a dog fighting ring where someone has to stick their hand in the middle of a fight to break it up.

Because of their history, they don't flinch from ears being pulled or tails stepped on, and they're total cuddle bugs.

Again, you have to get one with a good temperament, but I had hearing people say they're bad family dogs.
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Old 03-23-2011, 09:17 AM
 
Location: TX
3,029 posts, read 10,647,892 times
Reputation: 1362
^ yes I totally agree...
I used a Pit as an EXAMPLE of a dog that people get up in arms over etc...
(I never said they make bad family dogs)

I love Pits but understand people being cautious and warning people esp new pet owners with small kids to be wary. BUT the eway alot of people reacted in this thread was RIDICULIOUS!

In my expirence the WORST dogs for kids...CHIHUAHUA's!!
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Old 03-23-2011, 10:45 AM
 
27 posts, read 69,668 times
Reputation: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denton56 View Post
How old are your children. Little kids aren't very good with dogs and often don't like them or understand how to play with them. If your kids are under 9 or 10, I wouldn't recommend getting a dog. They'll lose interest quickly when the dog behaves like a dog, needs attention, needs exercise, etc.

That is just such a blanket comment that may be correct in isolated circumstances, but most young families also happily have dogs.

We got our golden when the big girls were not quite 2 and when we got our second dog our kids were 8, 4 and 2 and it has always been wonderful and the kids have loved feeling important in helping care for the dogs.

We also chose very kid friendly dogs and worked on socializing them. The first dog a golden is a wonderful family dog - but if you want 20lbs and non shedding NOT your kind of dog. Our second dog is a Havanese -- hypo-allergenic, non shedding - Think she is around 12-13lbs (so maybe too small) GREAT breed. Kind of Golden personality in a small package. Fun outdoors to romp around with and loves to be cuddled inside (only problem is finicky eater - which is very odd after being used to the big dog).

I haven't read all the posts - but I think adding a dog once your household settles a bit could be wonderful. Just don't rush into the first dog you find. Best of luck
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Old 03-23-2011, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Ashburn, VA
989 posts, read 2,469,242 times
Reputation: 637
Okay, I also wanted to weigh in on this. First, please think this through. Don't suprise your husband with this, it's really not fair (put yourself in his shoes). Second, I agree that the added stress of adding a new animal (puppy or not) is HUGE, regardless of whether you are also dealing with other stressors in your life (like an extended deployment). You mentioned you like to keep a clean house so you want a dog that doesn't shed. I am sorry to say that, despite your best efforts, a dog WILL bring dirt and grime into your house. I know, you can clean it up, but it's just one more thing to think about. Honestly, I would highly recommend going the foster route before you commit to dog ownership at this point. You may realize that it's perfect for you but you may also realize that it's not...

On a side note, check out this facebook fan page (a litter of rescued pitbulls and their adoptive families)- sorry, but I need to defend the pitties a bit....

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Annie...2378389?ref=ts
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Old 03-24-2011, 03:36 AM
 
Location: somewhere
4,264 posts, read 8,144,001 times
Reputation: 3143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denton56 View Post
How old are your children. Little kids aren't very good with dogs and often don't like them or understand how to play with them. If your kids are under 9 or 10, I wouldn't recommend getting a dog. They'll lose interest quickly when the dog behaves like a dog, needs attention, needs exercise, etc.

I have to disgree with you on this, we have always had dogs and never had an issue with our kids and the dogs. Our kids never tired of the dogs or didn't want to interact with them.
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Old 03-24-2011, 04:04 AM
 
Location: Floyd Co, VA
3,414 posts, read 5,115,776 times
Reputation: 7226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alley01 View Post
But, I would recommend a shelter, like the ASPCA that has a foster program.
Alley01 - Just a bit of a clarification - The ASPCA is a New York City shelter - even though they have the kind of funding that allows them to run national ads to raise money from people all over the country.

Every SPCA and HS is an independent organization with no affiliation to the ASPCA or HSUS and they do not receive any of the monies donated to those two big name groups.

I think that you want to suggest that the OP go to her local Humane Society, Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals or other rescue, which may or may not have a foster program. In larger cities and towns that group may have a shelter facillity separate from the local municipal "pound" (Animal Control) or they may have a contract with the government to run the governments facility. Smaller groups are often strictly foster based, may be all -volunteer, no paid staff and don't have the kind of $ that it takes to support a shelter.

To the OP - there is a great dog out there for your family - take your time. May your new best friend bring much joy to your lives.
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Old 03-24-2011, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Brambleton, VA
2,187 posts, read 6,815,683 times
Reputation: 2161
Quote:
Originally Posted by zugor View Post
Alley01 - Just a bit of a clarification - The ASPCA is a New York City shelter - even though they have the kind of funding that allows them to run national ads to raise money from people all over the country.

Every SPCA and HS is an independent organization with no affiliation to the ASPCA or HSUS and they do not receive any of the monies donated to those two big name groups.

I think that you want to suggest that the OP go to her local Humane Society, Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals or other rescue, which may or may not have a foster program. In larger cities and towns that group may have a shelter facillity separate from the local municipal "pound" (Animal Control) or they may have a contract with the government to run the governments facility. Smaller groups are often strictly foster based, may be all -volunteer, no paid staff and don't have the kind of $ that it takes to support a shelter.

To the OP - there is a great dog out there for your family - take your time. May your new best friend bring much joy to your lives.
Yes, I included the link in my previous post - if you click on it, it is to our program here in NOVA not to the National program. I completely understand the financial differences between the two. The program I posted the link for is local to Northern Virginia, is a shelter, and is recognized as being a part of the ASPCA national group as they work to pull dogs and cats from situations that the ASPCA and HSUS work with. It also does have a great foster program.
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