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Old 07-08-2011, 06:59 AM
 
Location: New-Dentist Colony
5,740 posts, read 8,971,886 times
Reputation: 3858

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Quote:
Originally Posted by brenpilot View Post
People only move here for jobs. The DC area is a great place to visit, but so awful a place to live that people would rather struggle to survive in places like Colorado and California than move here. If I didn't work in an industry that forced me to be here, I would be long gone as well.


Speak for yourself, bucko. Don't project your unahppiness onto everyone else.

I love this area--and I have lived in Colorado, Vermont, NC, NYC (Manhattan), Texas, Georgia, and other places. Some might be prettier, and some might be more polite, but they can get boring. And having a good job is a big part of happiness.

Not only does the DC area have jobs; it also has a huge number of museums (often free), a variety of cultural offerings, many parks, bike paths, access to rivers and beaches, easy access to other interesting cities, great medical facilities, great restaurants, and in many places a lower cost of living than other areas in the Mid-Atlantic (such as the greater NYC/CT/NJ area).

You could not pay me enough to live in California--other than the Bay Area (and that's only if I were fabulously wealthy). The state is bankrupt, there's a ton of crime and racial strife, taxes are crazy high, it's much more polluted than here, and the average person there has no idea when WWII was fought or who was president during the Civil War. No thanks.

Sure, we have traffic. What place doesn't? But the traffic isn't that bad if you move closer to your job, find a job closer to home, or engineer a reverse commute. If you work in DC and live in Loudoun because you absolutely must have a three-car garage and 5,000 SF of indoor space, you're an idiot, and you deserve the hell you're enduring during rush hour.

Last edited by Carlingtonian; 07-08-2011 at 07:26 AM..
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Old 07-08-2011, 07:00 AM
 
564 posts, read 1,277,597 times
Reputation: 390
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
I guess they'd rather stay in place, starve, and whine. People are irrational.
Hey, my extended family has been in the DC area for almost 50 years. Never once have I heard of a family member being laid off or who couldn't find work. For me, that's one of the biggest factors making somewhere a "good" or "bad" place to live.
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Old 07-08-2011, 07:06 AM
 
4,711 posts, read 10,891,978 times
Reputation: 3774
Quote:
Originally Posted by brenpilot View Post
...If I didn't work in an industry that forced me to be here, I would be long gone as well.
With all due respect....who forces you to work in that industry?
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Old 07-08-2011, 07:10 AM
 
65 posts, read 104,441 times
Reputation: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
I guess they'd rather stay in place, starve, and whine. People are irrational.
That's true.

By the way, please don't think I'm trying to be combative or start a fight. I'm personally happy here and have a great job that I love. However, I also know that when I try to persuade former classmates to take a job in this area, they turn it down. There has to be a reason for that.

Here's my thinking: The collective ego of this area is over inflated, and we have a hard time understanding why anyone wouldn't want to live here.

Yes, it is great for some, however I would argue the majority of people don't feel they fit in here. It's too urban for people from the Midwest and South, too suburban for the Northeasterners, and too "East Coast" for West Coasters (again, this is a generalization, not saying it's every single persons individual opinion). This area is just too much of a mishmash for it to feel right for a lot of people.
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Old 07-08-2011, 07:10 AM
 
Location: Dudes in brown flip-flops
660 posts, read 1,501,839 times
Reputation: 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by brenpilot View Post

Second of all, if this is such a great place to live, what is the explanation for people not leaving places like San Diego, Colorado Springs, etc. for this area?

Again, I understand the CD opinion may be that this is a great place to live, but I don't buy that as the majority opinion.
I agree with you that most people in the U.S. aren't clamoring to move to the DC area, but does that mean it's a bad place to live? That's debatable.

People aren't moving to San Diego, either. Its growth rate is lower than Fairfax County's and pales in comparison to Loudoun or Prince William's. I'd also wager that 2/3 of the growth in San Diego is coming from across the border, rather than other parts of the country. If San Diego's so great, why are there so few transplants there? I lived there for a summer and hardly met anyone who wasn't from California or Arizona.
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Old 07-08-2011, 07:17 AM
 
Location: New-Dentist Colony
5,740 posts, read 8,971,886 times
Reputation: 3858
Quote:
Originally Posted by brenpilot View Post
Second of all, if this is such a great place to live, what is the explanation for people not leaving places like San Diego, Colorado Springs, etc. for this area?
Your "logic" here is hilarious. You're seriously suggesting that if a place is a really great place to live, then no one will live anywhere else?

Funny you would cite Colorado Springs as such a great place to live. It has exponentially less going on culturally than Denver or Boulder. That tells me a lot.
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Old 07-08-2011, 07:18 AM
 
65 posts, read 104,441 times
Reputation: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen 81 View Post
I agree with you that most people in the U.S. aren't clamoring to move to the DC area, but does that mean it's a bad place to live? That's debatable.

People aren't moving to San Diego, either. Its growth rate is lower than Fairfax County's and pales in comparison to Loudoun or Prince William's. I'd also wager that 2/3 of the growth in San Diego is coming from across the border, rather than other parts of the country. If San Diego's so great, why are there so few transplants there? I lived there for a summer and hardly met anyone who wasn't from California or Arizona.
Where I lived, my parents were from Nebraska, I had neighbors from Pennsylvania, Maryland, New York, Florida, and Oregon, just to name a few. Having NAS North Island and Camp Pendleton makes Southern California mostly transplants.
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Old 07-08-2011, 07:19 AM
 
65 posts, read 104,441 times
Reputation: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by car54 View Post
With all due respect....who forces you to work in that industry?
Being a pilot limits your choice of domicile...
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Old 07-08-2011, 07:20 AM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,799 posts, read 10,709,555 times
Reputation: 2522
Oh dear.

I think what others have said - that some folks decide they want to live in Calif, or Colorado, or NYC and then try to find a job, while most folks here come here for a job, or at least knowing the market is strong, and or because they are drawn to one of the unique niche job markets in the areas, and NOT because they are in love with the area.

I dont want to poke at what others have said about nice things abiout this area - my family and I LOVE the Smithsonian, we love (I guess youve gathered that) the trails, and we like being between the SNP and the beaches. ANd not too far from NYC. I think the climate is, overall, pretty good.

But cmon folks. If one didnt have a job here, you could get the same climate and similar locational advantages, in Charlottesville, or Baltimore or Lancaster PA - at significantly lower housing costs. Yeah, it would be longer to get into the Smithsonian, but how many times do you really get in to it? You can pay for a LOT of admissions at the Baltimore Museum of Art and Maryland Science Center, and the cost of an occasional trip down to the Smithsonian, for the incremental housing costs of living here. Charlottesville would be farther from the shore and NYC, but closer to the mountains. Lancaster and Baltimore closer to NYC.

ANd the folks doing important things? Firstly, a lot of our neighbors do private sectorish things no different from what folks anywhere else do (that of course is one of the areas little secrets). Second lots of folks working as Fed staff or fed contractors, do stuff thats not terribly different from what private sector folks do everywhere - whether its HR, IT, accounting or whatever. Or even academic/research work. ANd of course theres lots of feds/contractors/military who are located in places other than here. Sure the occasional person with a unique fed job, or working for one of the more interesting NGO's, adds a certain extra spice to life in the region (the CIA folks would, if only they could talk about what they did) but I wouldnt say they transform social life here. Maybe for y'all who live up in Great Falls or in Clarendon its different.

I mean I can see why someone who is retired, AND is in a paid off house they like (and has no particular desire to cash in that equity), would choose to stay here. I mean especially if you have established ties here. But that folks with no particular ties here, who A. Need a job (and presumably will need to commute) and B. would start out from scratch in the RE market - DONT seek this area out unless they are already drawn to the job market, makes abundant sense to me.
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Old 07-08-2011, 07:21 AM
 
Location: New-Dentist Colony
5,740 posts, read 8,971,886 times
Reputation: 3858
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen 81 View Post
I agree with you that most people in the U.S. aren't clamoring to move to the DC area....
The fact is (unfortunately, IMHO), people ARE moving here in droves from other places. Look at the population growth in NOVA and in Montgomery County. And every other day someone posts on here saying "I'm going to be moving from XXX and wonder where I should live."

(BTW--kudos on the "brown flip flops" reference!)
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