U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Virginia > Northern Virginia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-18-2011, 02:25 PM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,816 posts, read 10,725,934 times
Reputation: 2523

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by hilsmom View Post
all I know is that the single family homes I have seen in lorton station and south riding area where you are inches away from your neighbors are not at ALL what I want. If THAT is what "smart growth" advocates are pushing for, no thanks.
smart growth advocates are pusing for a range of options. Not one size fits all. But enough dense/TOD/more walkable (realizing those arent ALWAYS correlated) to meet the growing demand for it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-18-2011, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Fairfax, VA
1,449 posts, read 2,810,594 times
Reputation: 471
I get it - those bizarre might-as-well-be-a-gigantic-TH houses just perplex me. There MUST be some demand for them, and I totally understand why they build them in places that are actually rail accessible. But the ones on former farmland with no public transport nearby make NO sense to me.

I worked for the Arlington County Board at one point - I'm very familiar with the concepts under discussion. I would LOVE to live a lifestyle where a car was NOT a necessity. Our new house gets me closer to my "office" and about the same distance to my husband's. He also has the option to bike to work. I guess I could to, but I'm not that motivated and only have to go to "the office" 2 days a week. We have done all we can to be as close to amenities as possible. I just know we want a yard to go with that. If I had to commute downtown, a charming smaller house closer in with a yard still would have beaten the gigantic no-yard house any day of the week.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2011, 03:14 PM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,816 posts, read 10,725,934 times
Reputation: 2523
Quote:
Originally Posted by hilsmom View Post
I get it - those bizarre might-as-well-be-a-gigantic-TH houses just perplex me.

Id think thats worthy of its own thread. At one point we lived in a small old sfh in the shadow of much larger notquitebutalmost McMansion, and it was far more of a privacy issue than living in a TH.

Not exacly the same as what you find in a development like Barristers Keep on Pickett, but similar privacy issues.


I guess some people just DO NOT LIKE common walls.

From the societal POV, the density (and resultant impacts on local retail, transp mode choice, etc) are similar enough, I guess.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2011, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Fairfax, VA
1,449 posts, read 2,810,594 times
Reputation: 471
maybe it is worth its own thread. I think the reason they are built in the transit oriented communities is for those folks who do NOT like common walls, but still support density near transit.

But driving around our new area out near Chantilly and seeing these bizarre no-yard homes right off route 50 makes me say "Huh?" And they don't appear to be walkable to anything. At least in South Riding, you get the community amenities.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2011, 04:12 PM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,816 posts, read 10,725,934 times
Reputation: 2523
Quote:
Originally Posted by hilsmom View Post
maybe it is worth its own thread. I think the reason they are built in the transit oriented communities is for those folks who do NOT like common walls, but still support density near transit.

But driving around our new area out near Chantilly and seeing these bizarre no-yard homes right off route 50 makes me say "Huh?" And they don't appear to be walkable to anything. At least in South Riding, you get the community amenities.

I doubt many people buy large houses on small lots, or townhouses, to express their support for TOD. At least not as the major factor - I think its more about getting convenient space, without paying for land they dont need, and dont want to maintain.

There are folks who dont want to pay extra for a quarter acre lot, and dont want to deal with a lawn in places no where near transit or anything walkable. For several decades there have been THs in the middle of nowhere for those folks (and in the past there were hirises in some rather odd locations). Now that big houses on small lots are in fashion, folks who dont like lawn mowing and dont like common walls, have an option.


I dont know why people think smart growthers invented density. There are high rises in Annandale and in Fairfax circle from the time before the smart growth movement. Those are not near transit, and are not advocated by smart growth people. Smart growth isnt so much at more density, as about putting more density in the places where it makes more sense.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-19-2011, 06:27 AM
 
Location: Fairfax, VA
1,449 posts, read 2,810,594 times
Reputation: 471
Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
I doubt many people buy large houses on small lots, or townhouses, to express their support for TOD. At least not as the major factor - I think its more about getting convenient space, without paying for land they dont need, and dont want to maintain.

.
I stated that incorrectly. I meant people who want a big newer house without common walls walking distance to public transportation...which indirectly supports the way the counties are trying to deal with density/smart growth in this area. But for most, you're right - they are not making that part of their thinking process.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-19-2011, 06:50 AM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 26,935,396 times
Reputation: 42862
Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
I guess some people just DO NOT LIKE common walls.
Yup. Different strokes for different folks, as they say. I tolerated common walls when we lived in California but you'll never see us living that way again. When we moved back here we were so happy to have a SFH and get more space and especially more light. I like having windows on four sides of my house, as well as plants and grass on all four sides of my house (IMO having greenery surrounding your house is very important for air quality and general well being/health. I also like being able to grow my own food in lots of little pocket spaces).

Having a shared wall meant I used to hear my neighbor's snoring at night and I knew way more than I wanted to about their bathroom and laundry habits since their plumbing ran down the wall we shared. I especially appreciate not sharing my neighbor's termites. Insects were a real problem in our California townhouse, especially when one of the renters brought in some flea bitten pets and the next thing you know the whole building got infested. Townhouse living is great for many people but we'll never do it again.

Anyway, it's nice to live in an area where you have choices. People who like density can find communities that suit them, those who prefer being more spread out can find neighborhoods like that as well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-19-2011, 06:57 AM
 
Location: New-Dentist Colony
5,740 posts, read 8,985,599 times
Reputation: 3858
Default Re. Common Walls

I know that walls are often/usually too thin in modern construction, but I will say that when I lived in a 100-year-old row house in DC 10 years ago, the (plaster) walls were so thick, you could hear absolutely nothing next door. It was wonderfully quiet. Actually quieter than our current SFH (which also has plaster walls but does have windows on the side of the house).

When you can hear someone snore next door, I believe you have what's called a "common-wall marriage."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-19-2011, 07:09 AM
 
5,073 posts, read 8,648,214 times
Reputation: 2727
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlingtonian View Post
I know that walls are often/usually too thin in modern construction, but I will say that when I lived in a 100-year-old row house in DC 10 years ago, the (plaster) walls were so thick, you could hear absolutely nothing next door. It was wonderfully quiet. Actually quieter than our current SFH (which also has plaster walls but does have windows on the side of the house).

When you can hear someone snore next door, I believe you have what's called a "common-wall marriage."
When we lived in a 90-year-old row house in DC 20 years ago, the walls may have been thick, but not thick enough to drown out the noise of (1) the post-college kids who moved next door and partied at all hours, (2) the combined forces of the ATF/FBI/DC Police, on the beautiful spring morning when they conducted a raid on the next group to live next door, who kept a low profile but turned out to be enforcers in a local "crew," or (3) the loud fights within, and medical emergencies of, the extended family who lived three doors down.

It was a walkable, transit-oriented community with many other attractions, but it wasn't enough to keep us or most of our neighbors with young children there. When you live in close proximity to others, it very much helps if they behave. When you can't safely or consistently make that assumption, other places with a bit more space between neighbors quickly start to look better.

Last edited by JD984; 08-19-2011 at 07:17 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-19-2011, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Fairfax, VA
1,449 posts, read 2,810,594 times
Reputation: 471
Quote:
Originally Posted by JEB77 View Post
When you live in close proximity to others, it very much helps if they behave. When you can't safely or consistently make that assumption, other places quickly start to look better.
This is VERY true. We have a nutcase who lives in my townhome neighborhood who causes all kinds of trouble. The other neighbors are very nice and/or keep to themselves. You unfortunately have no control over the actions of others.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Virginia > Northern Virginia
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:46 PM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top