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Old 03-23-2012, 04:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlingtonian View Post
One example: 511 N. Wakefield, 22203. Spacious, if you like this style of architecture.
I stand corrected, as I immediately ruled out any split level houses when I was looking. Does anyone actually like this type of architecture?
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Old 03-23-2012, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Prince William County, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spencgr View Post
I stand corrected, as I immediately ruled out any split level houses when I was looking. Does anyone actually like this type of architecture?
Not my style, but my grandparents have lived in a split level for the past 40 or so years...my brother and his wife are in the process of buying one (in another state)...
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Old 03-23-2012, 05:31 PM
 
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Originally Posted by HereinVA View Post
Not my style, but my grandparents have lived in a split level for the past 40 or so years...my brother and his wife are in the process of buying one (in another state)...
Oh, I don't deny that people live in split levels (for many years), and there are probably people that don't mind the look, but is there anyone out there that actually PREFERS the look of split levels to other types of architecture?
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Old 03-23-2012, 06:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spencgr View Post
Oh, I don't deny that people live in split levels (for many years), and there are probably people that don't mind the look, but is there anyone out there that actually PREFERS the look of split levels to other types of architecture?
I do not live in a split-level myself, but I guess people liked the look of split levels back in the 1960s and 1970s when a lot of them were built. While I can't say I prefer the look, I find them inoffensive, which is more than I can say for a lot of the housing going up now (particularly the McMansions, most of which I would be embarrassed to live in). Personally, I would rather live in a bland, non-pretentious split level than many of the architectural nightmares going up today. It will be interesting to see how the style of today's houses is viewed in 45 years.
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Old 03-23-2012, 06:32 PM
 
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We are not big fans of split level houses (hubby grew up in one and doesn't want another). Interesting comments about Shirlington - sounds like a place we would have loved 5 years ago, not so much now that we are a little older and have a little family.
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Old 03-23-2012, 07:06 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Carlingtonian View Post
I just don't see them living in Shirlington, given what the OP specified.

Sure, there are other areas within an hour of the 'Gon, but if they don't like NARL, with its rationally-sized prewar homes and unfortunate lack of garages, they won't like those other areas, either.

Except for McLean. They should definitely look at the eastern part. (Don't you think? You're a McLeanean, as I recall.) But I don't know if they can find anything there within that range that's not a fixer-upper or tiny.
I'm not sure that either North Arlington or McLean would have a lot to offer the OP that doesn't fall into the old and/or split-level category. They are close to the Pentagon, but expensive.

I guess I had places like Falls Church near EFC or WFC in mind, as well as some of the other places OP had mentioned like Springfield and Burke. They are more affordable and I wouldn't prejudge whether the OP might not end up liking them better than North Arlington and McLean. Or there might be places in South Arlington, putting aside Shirlington, that might interest the OP, if proximity to the Pentagon is the most important consideration.
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Old 03-23-2012, 07:14 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
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Why were split levels popular in the East but not the West? When growing up in CA in the 60s there were one story and two story houses, all generally on concrete slabs (no basements) with 2 car garages. Why wasn't that the case here?
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Old 03-23-2012, 07:51 PM
 
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Originally Posted by RamblingMan View Post
Personally, I would rather live in a bland, non-pretentious split level than many of the architectural nightmares going up today. It will be interesting to see how the style of today's houses is viewed in 45 years.
Well, that's a tough call. I guess if I was forced to choose split level versus McMansion, I'd likely choose McMansion, only because it is more apt to be updated. In terms of curb appeal, both are equally hideous.
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Old 03-23-2012, 09:01 PM
 
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I would rather buy something older than live in a McMansion. So much space, who needs that much? The heating and cooling bills would be outrageous! We are will to compromise on the size and the style doesn't matter as much, as long as the layout inside is functional and updated. Although I would rather not have to worry about a remodel, it is not completely out of the question if we were able to get a property for the right price. There are quite a few homes in Burke that have been nicely remodeled that fall within (and below) our price range, just not sure about the commute. Thanks again for all the input, def. gives us more to think about!
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Old 03-24-2012, 01:49 AM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
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How about Mount Vernon? You can get a nice older home in an established neighborhood off the GW Parkway in your price range. We don't have any metro or VRE down here but the bus service is pretty good. It would also be an easy and pleasant drive up the parkway to the pentagon. Some of my neighbors even bike to it up the Mount Vernon trail when the weather's nice.
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