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Old 04-14-2012, 04:51 PM
 
Location: You want kimchi with that?
8,479 posts, read 5,869,334 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
For a descent bar scene you need younger people who will ramain in the area after work, and who possibly live close by. There's just not that type of situation right now around Huntington..
I doubt there ever will be. There are a limited number of likely sites for redevelopment within a quarter mile of the metro, and I suspect the new buildings that do exist are drawing a less bar oriented crowd - just as in DC theres big difference between say H Street on the one hand, and Barracks Row on the other. Not all the people who want apts near metro are single 20 somethings, and not all single 20 somethings have the same interests.
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Old 04-14-2012, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,141 posts, read 15,770,769 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
I almost never hear "unwalkable" I here walkable used far, far more, and its legitimate usage. And its used by lots of people who aren't "hipsters" by any stretch of the imagination.

I'd love to see the pejorative use of "hipster" disappear, but I'm not counting on it.
Is "unhipster" a word yet? I'm sure that's one my kids would use to describe me.

I have a fantasy though that hipsters find Mount Vernon wildly ironic and decide to locate around here, turning the Thieves market into an organic produce co-op and the vacant Fisherman's Wharf restaurant into a coffeehouse with live music nightly.

Last edited by CAVA1990; 04-14-2012 at 05:11 PM..
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Old 04-14-2012, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 14,870,398 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
You have said, I think, that you would like the diversity of preferences respected. I don't think calling peoples expressed preferences "excuses" is consistent with that.
LOL LOL you should hear some of the excuses I've heard. It's amazing how many people talk big about how much they want to walk... but when you bring up opportunities, oh how the excuses fly. BTW, I've seen this happen in so-called trendy "walkable" areas as well as out in my neck of the woods. The sad truth is lots of people want to talk the talk, but that's all they want to do. That's why I said I hope all this talk about "walkability" results in more people actually walking, I really, really do hope so. But... to be honest... I have my doubts.
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Old 04-14-2012, 05:29 PM
 
Location: You want kimchi with that?
8,479 posts, read 5,869,334 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caladium View Post
LOL LOL you should hear some of the excuses I've heard. It's amazing how many people talk big about how much they want to walk... but when you bring up opportunities, oh how the excuses fly. BTW, I've seen this happen in so-called trendy "walkable" areas as well as out in my neck of the woods. The sad truth is lots of people want to talk the talk, but that's all they want to do. That's why I said I hope all this talk about "walkability" results in more people actually walking, I really, really do hope so. But... to be honest... I have my doubts.

did you check the link to the MWCOG (Metro Washington Council of Goverments) paper I posted?

There are loads of people walking, but if one doesn't like to walk where loads of people walk, it will be hard to find them (one can drive by those areas I suppose, but I think you get a better view walking)
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Old 04-14-2012, 05:31 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, NC (formerly Vienna, VA)
5,824 posts, read 5,953,230 times
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When I think "walkability" it doesn't have to be urban or hipster (honestly, I don't even know what "hipster" is, but it sounds good). Small towns can be very walkable, too. For example, if you go to St. Michael's, MD, I think that is a walkable small town. Middleburg is also walkable - there's even a big supermarket in town! Historic Williamsburg is walkable. Smaller cities like Roanoke or Lynchburg are also walkable. Of course, big cities, like DC and NYC are mostly walkable. To me, what is least walkable is the middle of the spectrum - the suburbs. The suburbs are generally designed for people with cars.

I used to live near Montgomery Mall in MD in suburb heaven. The mall was literally across the street from my development. I could walk there - there were sidewalks. Next to the mall was a strip mall with a pizza place and some other things. Yet, I would not describe that area as "walkable." Suburbs were designed for and in the motor age. In the DC suburbs, however, it is so congested and built up that one effect is that shopping centers are often built directly across or next to developments. This allows people to walk to them, but honestly, they are designed to be driven to. And while a neighborhood may bump up against a shopping center, I wouldn't describe it as walkable, although there are some places to walk to.

I think the trend to build The Kentlands (Gaithersburg), The Brambletons, the King Farms (Rockville), and The Lakelands (G-burg) of the world is because people want to be able to walk to town again, as was done in the old days. The success of these developments seems to mirror this belief. These developments tend to sell for more money than comparable "non-walkable" developments. I don't think this is a new fad. The Kentlands, which was one of the first neo-traditional "new urbanist" development in the country was built back in the late 80's/early 90's - about 20 years ago. I don't think it's any less in demand today than it was when they were built. The trend has spread across the country.

On a slight tangent, I always loved that in Central American/South American towns were built around squares. There is a square in the middle - usually a park. Businesses, a church and a school or similar were surrounding it on the perimeter. Spreading out from the center are the homes. Everyone can walk to the center of town. In Europe, most places have a village center other than maybe the countryside, but even in small towns there are small town centers. The suburbs is a modern invention that dates from the 20th century (without looking it up, I'm guessing the 1930's/1940's) and really came about from the rise of the automobile. Clearly, it caught on over the past 75 years or so, but I think many people realize that they don't want to be reliant on cars for every little errand or activity, hence the desire for walkability.
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Old 04-14-2012, 05:32 PM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 14,870,398 times
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I haven't had time to read through all the posts, so if the following suggestion has already been made, my apologies. I just wanted to note the variety of opinions I'm seeing when it comes to what this term means... and that's just from the forum regulars. If the regulars on this forum have such differing definitions, just think how many our readers have.

By the way, it's cool to have different opinions--who says we all have to agree? What's important, IMO, is to be aware of the possibility that not everyone may understand what you mean. So, when discussing neighborhoods it's good make a point to give a little more detail about what we mean when we say walkable.

If by "walkable" you mean a trendy area with storefronts, say so. If by "walkable" you mean the sidewalks are good and you can walk to a shopping plaza, say so. Etc. If you're confused by what someone else has said--ask. And most of all, if you think someone has said a neighborhood is not walkable, and you think it is--by all means speak up and say why you think so. It may just be a matter of different definitions. Even better, post a few photos. Photos are a great way to show what you mean.

I said this in another thread, and I'll note it again--we have people moving here from all over the country and all over the world. I've gotten DMs from readers who were confused by this issue, so IMO it's a good idea to use a little more detail when we use this particular term. Just a suggestion.
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Old 04-14-2012, 05:32 PM
 
Location: You want kimchi with that?
8,479 posts, read 5,869,334 times
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this is interesting

Walking in America: How Walk Score puts a number on walkability. - Slate Magazine

'"Were looking at how to start including human commentary in our ratings, says Lerner. [an exec at walkscore - bbd]Its a tricky issue. You have to be wary of people gaming the system; also, aesthetics are important to people. (Planner Jarret Walker wonders: Is someone working on a computer algorithm that will study every Street View photo in the country and assign a universally-respected "design score"?) Walk Score has also contemplated using anonymized cell photo data to track how crowded streets might be. Here its easy to imagine the possibilities for various mashups: Merge Walk Score with, say, MITs Real Time Rome project to see how much walkable neighborhoods and streets correlate to actual walking (something that researchers have already examined, at least in the analog sense'
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Old 04-14-2012, 05:34 PM
 
Location: You want kimchi with that?
8,479 posts, read 5,869,334 times
Reputation: 2182
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caladium View Post
I haven't had time to read through all the posts, so if this has already been said, my apologies. I just wanted to note that from what I have been able to read it's clear that there are a variety of opinions when it comes to what this term means. .

it specifically gives data on increases in walking (and biking) in the greater washington region.
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Old 04-14-2012, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, NC (formerly Vienna, VA)
5,824 posts, read 5,953,230 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
this is interesting

Walking in America: How Walk Score puts a number on walkability. - Slate Magazine

'"Were looking at how to start including human commentary in our ratings, says Lerner. [an exec at walkscore - bbd]Its a tricky issue. You have to be wary of people gaming the system; also, aesthetics are important to people. (Planner Jarret Walker wonders: Is someone working on a computer algorithm that will study every Street View photo in the country and assign a universally-respected "design score"?) Walk Score has also contemplated using anonymized cell photo data to track how crowded streets might be. Here its easy to imagine the possibilities for various mashups: Merge Walk Score with, say, MITs Real Time Rome project to see how much walkable neighborhoods and streets correlate to actual walking (something that researchers have already examined, at least in the analog sense'
It was more interesting when I posted the link to that article yesterday. See post #12
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Old 04-14-2012, 05:38 PM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 14,870,398 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
it specifically gives data on increases in walking (and biking) in the greater washington region.
Glad to hear it. Hope it lasts!
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