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Old 10-06-2012, 06:33 PM
 
Location: Reston, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlingtonian View Post
This one's on a ginormous lot and in one of the most desirable locations--but the exterior styling is nothing exceptional.
"BRING YOUR BUILDER & YOUR IMAGINATION"

This house is being marketed as a tear-down!
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Old 10-06-2012, 06:38 PM
 
Location: New-Dentist Colony
5,739 posts, read 8,950,593 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JfromReston View Post
"BRING YOUR BUILDER & YOUR IMAGINATION"

This house is being marketed as a tear-down!
In that area (near Langley/Great Falls), I'm betting that all that reflects is that it's on a giant lot and surrounded by $3 million mcMansions. I could be wrong, but I'd bet it's totally OK inside by most people's standards (though perhaps a bit dated or whatnot). Just the agent figured they'd get more interest from people who want an 8-bedroom Georgian in that area and will pay 700K to knock down a perfectly good house so they can have their nouveau riche monstrosity.
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Old 10-06-2012, 07:00 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlingtonian View Post
In that area (near Langley/Great Falls), I'm betting that all that means is that it's surrounded by $3 million mcMansions. I could be wrong, but I'd bet it's totally OK inside by most people's standards (though perhaps a bit dated or whatnot). Just the agent figured they'd get more interest from people who want an 8-room Georgian in that area and will pay 700K to knock down a perfectly good house so they can have their monstrosity.
You bet wrong. That area is closer to North Arlington than Great Falls and it is not surrounded by $3M McMansions. More like a mix of homes usually ranging from $800K to $2M. Sellers of these types of properties usually do not market them exclusively as tear downs unless they would require extensive renovation. If a builder or a buyer wants to do a tear down, they will not be deterred by the fact that an existing house is habitable, so why should a seller limit the potential pool of buyers by labeling such a property a tear down?

For the OP, another area to consider might be the Sleepy Hollow area of Falls Church or nearby sections of Annandale - both are near Columbia Pike, which leads directly to the Pentagon.
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Old 10-06-2012, 07:11 PM
 
Location: New-Dentist Colony
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JEB77 View Post
You bet wrong. That area is closer to North Arlington than Great Falls and it is not surrounded by $3M McMansions. More like a mix of homes usually ranging from $800K to $2M.
Ah, only $2 million!

There are plenty of perfectly good houses that get torn down in N. Arlington. If it's a moderately-sized or small house, and it's on a large lot, its odds for survival are not great. Even if it's in great condition. I see it all the time. There is a dearth of large lots close to DC.

Sleepy Hollow/Columbia Pike is heavily low-income Hispanic, and the schools are not as highly rated as they are in FFX, (especially Oakton, FC, McLean and Vienna) or N. Arlington.

Here's another option in N. Arlington. Great schools, quick shot to the P'gon. Only 900 SF, but it's also only $500K. You could use the rest of your budget to expand the upper floor, build a front porch, etc. I suspect the "as is" clause is just because it's an estate sale, and the heirs just want it gone, quickly.

Last edited by Carlingtonian; 10-06-2012 at 07:45 PM..
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Old 10-07-2012, 09:11 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlingtonian View Post
Ah, only $2 million!

There are plenty of perfectly good houses that get torn down in N. Arlington. If it's a moderately-sized or small house, and it's on a large lot, its odds for survival are not great. Even if it's in great condition. I see it all the time. There is a dearth of large lots close to DC.

Sleepy Hollow/Columbia Pike is heavily low-income Hispanic, and the schools are not as highly rated as they are in FFX, (especially Oakton, FC, McLean and Vienna) or N. Arlington.

Here's another option in N. Arlington. Great schools, quick shot to the P'gon. Only 900 SF, but it's also only $500K. You could use the rest of your budget to expand the upper floor, build a front porch, etc. I suspect the "as is" clause is just because it's an estate sale, and the heirs just want it gone, quickly.
I agree that there are plenty of "perfectly good houses" that get torn down inside-the-Beltway, but they aren't invariably marketed as tear downs. Marketing a house exclusively as a tear down, with no interior pictures, suggests that it's in pretty bad shape.

The Sleepy Hollow area is not itself heavily low-income Hispanic, but feeds into schools that draw from a number of such neighborhoods. The median incomes in some of the census tracts in the Sleepy Hollow area, for example, are higher than any of those in the Town of Vienna or City of Falls Church. It's a relatively easy commute to the Pentagon, and the schools are still Fairfax schools that offer a lot of things that are not available in many school systems around the country.

My guess is that the Sleepy Hollow area schools were in South Arlington, some other Arlington poster would likely praise their diversity, breadth of courses, and strong PTA groups. I hate to see these areas red-lined by people who think they are being helpful by steering people away from areas full of nice homes, but too many of "them."
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Old 10-07-2012, 11:17 AM
 
Location: New-Dentist Colony
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JEB77 View Post
I agree that there are plenty of "perfectly good houses" that get torn down inside-the-Beltway, but they aren't invariably marketed as tear downs. Marketing a house exclusively as a tear down, with no interior pictures, suggests that it's in pretty bad shape.

The Sleepy Hollow area is not itself heavily low-income Hispanic, but feeds into schools that draw from a number of such neighborhoods. The median incomes in some of the census tracts in the Sleepy Hollow area, for example, are higher than any of those in the Town of Vienna or City of Falls Church. It's a relatively easy commute to the Pentagon, and the schools are still Fairfax schools that offer a lot of things that are not available in many school systems around the country.

My guess is that the Sleepy Hollow area schools were in South Arlington, some other Arlington poster would likely praise their diversity, breadth of courses, and strong PTA groups. I hate to see these areas red-lined by people who think they are being helpful by steering people away from areas full of nice homes, but too many of "them."
Well, I wasn't "steering people away" from Sleepy Hollow--but it is unhelpful not to give newcomers the full picture so they can make an informed decision. Sleepy Hollow is in fact signficantly occupied by low-income Hispanics. That means the schools and neighborhoods have the challenges attendant to that population--mainly linguistic but some cultural. That said, I would also have given the same description of much of South Arlington, whose high school ranks among the very bottom in average SAT scores. I'd even say it for parts of N. Arlington--e.g., the KW Barrett Elementary zone just north of Route 50, near an area of low-income housing that has recently seen shootings (and an armed robbery last week, in the afternoon.) It's also near relatively well-off neighborhoods--but it was designated as a failing school I believe in 2010 or 2011.

I do think it's hypocritical and sanctimonious to insinuate that it's racist ("redlining") to inform people of the demographic nature of an area, when one would consciously avoid buying in that same area: I believe you went to JEB Stuart yourself, but when it was time to buy your home--correct me if I'm wrong--you chose McLean.

As to your insinuation itself: Remember the black female doctor who started a thread a while back, asking where to move her family? I recommended to her (in the thread and in a PM) that they consider N. Arlington and our neighborhood specifically.

Last edited by Carlingtonian; 10-07-2012 at 12:38 PM..
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Old 10-07-2012, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 27,037,127 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlingtonian View Post
Also: I believe you went to JEB Stuart yourself, but when it was time to buy your home--correct me if I'm wrong--you chose McLean.

Oooh, snap!
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Old 10-07-2012, 11:48 AM
 
Location: New-Dentist Colony
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Let me add that if educated higher-income newcomers came on here asking about Dumfries or much of Manassas, I would warn them about the significant concentrations of low-income/low-education whites, who also bring a whole set of cultural and linguistic challenges.
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Old 10-07-2012, 01:39 PM
 
5,071 posts, read 8,623,365 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlingtonian View Post
Well, I wasn't "steering people away" from Sleepy Hollow--but it is unhelpful not to give newcomers the full picture so they can make an informed decision. Sleepy Hollow is in fact signficantly occupied by low-income Hispanics. That means the schools and neighborhoods have the challenges attendant to that population--mainly linguistic but some cultural. That said, I would also have given the same description of much of South Arlington, whose high school ranks among the very bottom in average SAT scores. I'd even say it for parts of N. Arlington--e.g., the KW Barrett Elementary zone just north of Route 50, near an area of low-income housing that has recently seen shootings (and an armed robbery last week, in the afternoon.) It's also near relatively well-off neighborhoods--but it was designated as a failing school I believe in 2010 or 2011.

I do think it's hypocritical and sanctimonious to insinuate that it's racist ("redlining") to inform people of the demographic nature of an area, when one would consciously avoid buying in that same area: I believe you went to JEB Stuart yourself, but when it was time to buy your home--correct me if I'm wrong--you chose McLean.

As to your insinuation itself: Remember the black female doctor who started a thread a while back, asking where to move her family? I recommended to her (in the thread and in a PM) that they consider N. Arlington and our neighborhood specifically.
I think we have a different understanding as to what "Sleepy Hollow" refers to. I think of it as the residential neighborhoods fairly close to Sleepy Hollow Road in the 22044, 22042 and 22041 zip codes in unincorporated parts of Fairfax County with Falls Church addresses. These areas are not "significantly occupied" by low-income Hispanics, but instead by primarily by middle and upper-income whites. Census tract data from the 2010 census confirms this. The housing stock varies from homes that are around $500K to well over a million, and includes houses that would be in the OP's price range and a reasonably short commute to the Pentagon. Here's one example:

http://www.realtor.com/realestateand...4_M69929-50908

These neighborhoods tend to have a lot of older residents, so the local schools - which pull in students from nearby areas closer to Seven Corners and Bailey's Crossroads - now have a significant number of low-income and/or Hispanic students. That's a reality, and it may serve as a deterrent to some people considering these areas if they believe that their own kids will get less attention, but I do think it's worth pointing out that (1) younger families are moving into areas like Sleepy Hollow because of their proximity to DC, Tysons and the Pentagon; (2) to the extent that people associate Hispanic students with students who don't know English, that is changing in some parts of NoVa (in quite a few NoVa schools, the percentage of students who report as "Hispanic" is stable or increasing, but the percentage of students enrolled in ESOL classes is going down); and (3) neighborhoods and schools don't follow a single trajectory "up" or "down" (just as neighborhoods in Central Arlington and schools like W-L that some people once viewed as having too many low-income residents or students have become more popular, so too might that happen in some other areas). I also commented on your observations about the Sleepy Hollow-area schools because I thought they were confusing. They are part of the Fairfax County schools, but you said "they are not as highly rated as they are in FFX."

The OP is not looking in the price range that we were looking in when we moved to McLean. If he/she were, I'd be happy to provide recommendations in McLean. When we were younger and looking in a price range closer to the OP's price range years ago, we were tired of years of renovations and repairs in our 75-year old DC rowhouse and leaning towards new construction. We seemed to be priced out of McLean and Bethesda, there was virtually no new construction in Arlington or Falls Church at the time (the whole "tear down" phenomenon really came later), and we ended up in a part of Vienna zoned for schools that quite a few C-D posters were then more than happy to characterize as "not so good," "iffy" and the like. These schools served us quite well (and Marshall, in particular, no longer gets bad-mouthed by "helpful" C-D posterslike it used to), but I did eventually find the commute to downtown DC from the other side of Tysons to be a chore, particularly after the additional road closures that followed 9/11 and the ramp-up to the Tysons construction. Where we are now is an easier commute, although it still probably takes longer at times than it would take to get from the Sleepy Hollow area to the Pentagon.

Bottom line is that I am not interested in insinuating that you or any other C-D poster is a "racist," but will continue to push back when you or other posters imply that places like McLean are only for the uber-wealthy, or that wide swaths of Falls Church should be approached with extreme caution because low-income Hispanics attend schools in the area.

Last edited by JD984; 10-07-2012 at 02:56 PM..
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Old 10-07-2012, 02:23 PM
 
518 posts, read 1,293,547 times
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JEB makes good points but there is no "Central Arlington." Some posters on this forum have assumed "Central Arlington" is between Columbia Pike and Lee Highway. Others think it is between 50 and I-66, etc. Whatever it is, it is not a clearly defined area and not used by most people in Arlington. So it can be confusing when people capitalize the c in central. Just say "central Arlington" or "the central part of Arlington" or something else.

Like JEB said, Sleepy Hollow is actually an expensive neighborhood like Lake Barcroft. But both neighborhoods are adjacent to low to very low income apartments in Seven Corners, Culmore, and Baileys Crossroads. The low income areas are growing rapidly (in terms of population), and the schools like Baileys and Glen Forest are grossly overcrowded. The Washington Post had an article on Baileys, the largest Elementary School in the state at close to 1,300 students (which is close to the size of JEB Stuart High School.) Forgive me if I got the figure wrong--it was from memory.

I am surprised at the crime incidents in/near Buckingham, which Carlingtonian mentioned, but the neighborhood continues to lean upscale with about 100 new $1mill townhouses under construction along George Mason Drive in the middle of what used to be the most run down part of Buckingham. While Barrett is still the lowest ranked N Arlington Elementary, the school is rapidly improving and overcrowded because of all the kids in the adjacent expensive middle class neighborhoods.
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