U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Virginia > Northern Virginia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 04-09-2013, 08:47 PM
 
10 posts, read 14,190 times
Reputation: 11

Advertisements

Hello all,

I'm considering enrollment into the Marymount MBA Program as a part-time student. I'm doing a bit of due diligence and would appreciate your honest opinions on aspects of the college. Is anyone here alumni or know someone who attended the MBA Program? Could you please share your experience? I'm not native to the NOVA area - does the school have a prestigious reputation? My only concern is that it carries an ACBSP accreditation vs AACSB.

Your feedback is greatly appreciated.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-10-2013, 06:49 AM
 
617 posts, read 1,151,869 times
Reputation: 540
I am an alum of the Marymount MBA program, and I got my undergrad from another college, so going to Marymount was a conscious choice I made after some thought, it wasn't like I was just continuing on from undergrad.

My answer would be that it depends on what you want out of the degree. I worked full time and went to night school at the Ballston campus, with an occasional class in Reston. Some of the classes were difficult, some of them felt like I was just doing refresher courses from my business undergrad. The school certainly does not carry the same reputation as a Georgetown or a GW, and that might be important depending on what you want to do with it.

For me, I work in the Federal Government. My initial reasons for entering the program were to strengthen my resume to get a Fed job at a certain level, and to do it for myself, since my HS (and part of my undergrad time) weren't exactly marked by high achievement. At the time I was a contractor, starting a family, and wanted the stability. In the time I was in the program, I wound up accomplishing the career goals I wanted, so I finished up purely for myself.

While the program does not carry the prestige of some of the other schools mentioned, Marymount is a known name in the DC area, and it is also much cheaper. I had also applied and been accepted to GW but determined that the total cost would be twice as expensive, and for what I wanted out of it, I didn't want to take on the extra loans. If you were going to work in another city, or make a play for a high powered job at a private firm, you might want to consider a different school.

This is not to say that I didn't go in with high achievers. I worked with a group of people that, off the top of my head, held jobs in banking, as project managers in the Fed, one who was a marketing account executive for an auto company, and in government contracting.

As a bonus, you will have the opportunity to travel abroad for a week depending on which international class (one is required) you take. Each year, one of the internationally focused classes involved a trip. The year I had planned to go, it was the International Finance class. As I understand it, they spent the majority of the semester working on group projects, then they spent a week in Prague touring, going to lectures at the Prague Stock Exchange, and sampling the local beer markey during down time. Oh, I suppose they also did their presentations, but all I heard about was the touring, the Stock Exchange, and the beer.

I didn't get to go because the trip was around the same time my wife was expecting our first child. Clearly I made the right choice, but I do wish I had the opportunity.

Anyway, that's one person's opinion. I enjoyed my time there. Like any place, some professors are good, some are bad. If you're looking for prestige and an in for something high powered and private, you might want to look somewhere else. If you're looking to strengthen your resume, get a foot in the door somewhere, and use the achievement as a tool to help you work your way up (and also have less debt) Marymount should be fine for your needs.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2013, 08:48 AM
 
244 posts, read 481,205 times
Reputation: 207
I don't have any knowledge of the quality of the curriculum, but based on the ranking of the school, I'd say it's at least adequate.

In terms of reputation, it doesn't really matter unless you are from a top 10 school. Some would say top 5. Even MBAs from schools that are well ranked but not business-focused like MIT/Sloan are looked down upon compared to a Harvard MBA.

In other words, unless you are looking to get into a top program, don't worry about reputation. Just focus on getting a good education and have a solid plan on what to do after you graduate from it. I got my MBA from a good state university, and it was the best thing I've ever done in terms of education.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2013, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
4,489 posts, read 9,553,761 times
Reputation: 3656
I did Marymount's cohort program in Reston for my M. Ed. I have much the same thoughts as Forehead--it depends what your goals are from the program. As an education major, I realized that the prestige of the school didn't matter--it wasn't like there was more money or better job opportunities graduating from the 3x as expensive GW school of education.

An MBA is different though. If you want to head to wall street, you want a name that travels well. If you are just looking for a promotion within your company, or want to stay local and get a pay bump, then Marymount is fine.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2013, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Arlington, VA and Washington, DC
23,565 posts, read 33,282,476 times
Reputation: 32116
This thread gets created the same night I start thinking of Marymount for grad school for HR Management. Small world.

Forehead gave me some serious insight. I'm trying to stay local and get a segway to get out of banking which may be Marymount's MA Human Resources program.

Thanks.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2013, 11:55 AM
 
1,196 posts, read 1,861,954 times
Reputation: 686
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliTerp07 View Post
An MBA is different though. If you want to head to wall street, you want a name that travels well. If you are just looking for a promotion within your company, or want to stay local and get a pay bump, then Marymount is fine.
I agree with this quote most. Reputation is important beyond the top 5 or 10 if you leave the DC area. That being said, if you have solid experience from a good company (or well-known govt agency) or consulting firm then the MBA adds weight to the experience that is already there.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2013, 04:45 PM
 
262 posts, read 757,854 times
Reputation: 68
Know nothing about that particular program, but have seen this online program mentioned positively over at a computer forum:

Online MBA | Master of Business Administration Degree | WGU College of Business Online

Anyone do an online MBA? - AnandTech Forums

Last edited by mshan242709; 04-10-2013 at 04:59 PM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2013, 06:01 PM
 
1,623 posts, read 4,322,995 times
Reputation: 1291
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Dissenter View Post
This thread gets created the same night I start thinking of Marymount for grad school for HR Management. Small world.

Forehead gave me some serious insight. I'm trying to stay local and get a segway to get out of banking which may be Marymount's MA Human Resources program.

Thanks.
If the aim is just to get a job in HR because you are having trouble breaking in, there is no need to get a degree. You enroll, take the min. amount of classes since they charge by the credit for part time programs, you put the school and your concentration on your resume, you can even print fancy business cards for networking, use the school's career services department aggressively to find a job ASAP (help with your resume, cover letter, job boards, on campus interviewing, setting up informational interviews with alums), network with your classmates like crazy (they will have jobs and connections with the HR depts where they work), meet HR professors and ask career advice and any leads for jobs later (they love to talk about themselves), and interview as soon as you can, etc.

Hopefully you can find a job before the semester runs out and then you can drop out and you aren't obligated to pay for anything except to the one class you took.

This is called "renting" a degree and it is popular for graduate degree programs for fields where advanced education isn't necessary for entry level jobs. To the employers, you look like a prospective HR professional who is on their way with a graduate degree in the field. Once you get there, they sort of forget and only care about your performance at work. Sometimes they even have programs to pay for you to complete the MBA program.

This obviously works better for the better schools where they have more extensive career services offices and better quality alumni. Even the most expensive and prestigious part time MBA program wouldn't cost more than $4K or so for one class. So it might be worth it to pay for a prep class to do very well on the GMAT.

Added bonus: student discounts at movies and the Kennedy Center.

Good luck.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2013, 10:53 PM
 
2,333 posts, read 2,360,303 times
Reputation: 1126
all i know is their grad level administration are so..disorganizaed. my friend got her teacher stuff from them and she got the run around and had her diploma mispelled. inept, yes but decent. id choose another school tbh.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2013, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
4,489 posts, read 9,553,761 times
Reputation: 3656
Quote:
Originally Posted by BarqCider View Post
all i know is their grad level administration are so..disorganizaed. my friend got her teacher stuff from them and she got the run around and had her diploma mispelled. inept, yes but decent. id choose another school tbh.
This is true. I had a heck of a time getting my student teaching placement, and then I got short changed compared to other universities (I only had one placement, other schools did two so you could experience middle and high school both). I also had tax issues last year, because they didn't check the right box on my tuition statement.

I also don't feel like the education was that great. Compared to what I learned in undergrad, the Marymount education classes were the type of thing I could sleep through, write a paper in a couple hours, and get an A. I didn't sleep--I participated readily in discussions with my very intelligent peers and read the journals we were assigned, but I did not feel stretched, and most classes were fluff. That being said, I don't know if it was the university, or the change in majors that made things easier.

Still though...the price couldn't be beat.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Virginia > Northern Virginia
Similar Threads
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top