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Old 02-11-2014, 05:38 PM
 
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I'm curious to know when (approx. what year) Northern Virginia left the "South," or stop being identified with the rest of Virginia? My dad was born in DC and raised in Great Falls (1950s/1960s), and from the stories he shared about growing up, it sounded like Northern Virginia was no different than much of the rest of the state at that time. He always identified as a Virginian, was cognizant that even NoVa was south of the Mason-Dixon line, had a pretty thick Southern accent, and grew up with pastimes that might today be considered a little "redneck" (think drag racing, fishing, etc.). I asked him when he thought that NoVa began to take on its own identity, or at least a more "Northern" identity, and he thought it around the time that the Tysons Corner Center opened in 1968.

When do you think the big change occurred?
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Old 02-11-2014, 06:12 PM
 
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I won't answer your question because I haven't been in Northern Virginia nearly long enough (moved here in 2008) - but I'll say this: there are vestiges of the South here, in the infrastructure, the roads, the atmosphere. There's something just very different about it, compared to DC, or Montgomery County. But I can't quite put my finger on it. Of course, I'm not talking about Tysons Corner, or Ballston, or Rosslyn, or Reston (despite the best efforts of the master planned community, it wasn't trying to create the South).

This is only in areas that have maintained their historical feel. I'm thinking Warrenton, Winchester, Leesburg, Middleton, as well as certain pockets closer to DC, including historic Clifton, Manassas, Herndon, one block of Fairfax. Spotsylvania and Stafford feel very similar to the towns further down I95, the old South. Pockets of Old Towne Alexandria make me feel like I'm in Charleston. Many of these historic districts can bring back memories of Mount Airy, NC, or Asheville NC. Even Falls Church, Park Avenue, feels like you're in the sleepy south on a lazy Saturday. Parts further west have more of an Appalachia feel to it - Front Royal, Upperville, Berryville, Strasburg. Winchester/Leesburg are sort of hybrids between old South and Appalachia / West Virginia.

Northern Virginia is perhaps the most dynamic region around, because you can get an Old South feel in certain pockets, classic Appalachia, Americana, rural, as described above - as well as artsy enclaves (Del Ray, Occaquan), concrete jungles (Rosslyn, Crystal City), corporate areas (Tysons), youngish yuppie crowd (Ballston), incredible wealth and high real estate (Great Falls). You don't find this diversity anywhere else in the area.

So if Northern Virginia has unofficially "seceded" from the South, it's not all of it that has
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Old 02-11-2014, 06:32 PM
 
Location: New-Dentist Colony
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1865.
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Old 02-11-2014, 08:27 PM
 
Location: Ormond Beach, FL
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My wife was born in Richmond and moved to Fairfax in 1964. She does not consider northern Virginia southern. And never felt northern Virginia southern. To get a sense of when it diverged you would have to ask southside VA.
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Old 02-11-2014, 08:46 PM
 
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I grew up in nova and it's always been more northern than southern. Granted, at one point PWC and Stafford were still considered southern but that changed once the culture changed, more transplants came as well as urban sprawl and the amount of people commuting to DC grew... So it's various factors imo.
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Old 02-12-2014, 06:08 AM
Status: "Coastin’" (set 10 days ago)
 
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From what I hear from my mom it sounds like the culture initially started to change after WW2. After WW2 the population started to boom you can see a lot of post war housing and quite a few transplants started moving in then. My family has been in the area for over 100 years so I've heard stories about what it was like back in the day. My mom did grow up in arlington in the 60s there was still a huge plantation home up the street from her on 10 plus acres and across the street was a working farm until the 70s so that gives you an idea of how much the area has changed in a relatively short time.
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Old 02-12-2014, 06:09 AM
 
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Alexandria was occupied immediately at the start of hostilities, so 1861, sort of. Read about the state school shutdown protesting the 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education decision. I think NoVa reacted differently than the rest of the state, or at least parts of NoVa did...
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Old 02-12-2014, 05:13 PM
 
Location: New-Dentist Colony
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ecko_complex24 View Post
...My mom did grow up in arlington in the 60s there was still a huge plantation home up the street from her on 10 plus acres and across the street was a working farm until the 70s so that gives you an idea of how much the area has changed in a relatively short time.
I'm curious; where in Arlington? I'm near what used to be a dairy farm (till the '50s) in Bluemont Park.

There's still a grand old Victorian house on about 3 acres, at Wilson and McKinley (right after Upton Hill) in Falls Church. I fear for the day this property is developed.
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Old 02-13-2014, 05:21 PM
Status: "Coastin’" (set 10 days ago)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlingtonian View Post
I'm curious; where in Arlington? I'm near what used to be a dairy farm (till the '50s) in Bluemont Park.

There's still a grand old Victorian house on about 3 acres, at Wilson and McKinley (right after Upton Hill) in Falls Church. I fear for the day this property is developed.
I know exactly the house you're talking about. You're right it has been holding out development for sometime. The dairy farm you're talking about is that the one that is in the boulevard manor neighborhood? My mom grew up on north glebe about a mile passed Marymount university. All the houses sat a lot further off the road back then until eminent domain was used to widen glebe and put in sidewalks.
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Old 02-13-2014, 06:01 PM
 
Location: New-Dentist Colony
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ecko_complex24 View Post
I know exactly the house you're talking about. You're right it has been holding out development for sometime. The dairy farm you're talking about is that the one that is in the boulevard manor neighborhood? My mom grew up on north glebe about a mile passed Marymount university. All the houses sat a lot further off the road back then until eminent domain was used to widen glebe and put in sidewalks.
Yeah, Reeves Farmhouse is going to be turned into some kind of agricultural educational center or something. It's right between Boulevard Manor and Bluemont, and across the street from Dominion Hills.

Lame that they took all those people's land, but I guess when you're on a major road, it's always a risk.

A working farm on Glebe Road into the '70s--who woulda thought?!
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