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Old 10-23-2015, 04:06 PM
 
Location: New-Dentist Colony
5,740 posts, read 8,977,253 times
Reputation: 3858

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Quote:
Originally Posted by frostopsy View Post
They look ugly, boring, they serve as nothing but a status symbol. I've been to a few around here and they are tacky inside and seem like they are cheaply built. You can tell the when people over bought when they don't have landscaping, the house is the same color as every other house on the block, there's a 12 y/o car in the driveway...

My opinion, bulldoze them and build more roads. That would solve the traffic problems and McMansion problems at the same time.
I think your last sentence is in jest--but I do worry what will happen in 20 or 30 years, when these things start falling apart. Or are simply not wanted, because they're neither charmingly old nor new and modern anymore.

I fear they'll be subdivided into apartments--or perhaps demolished to make way for something even larger.

We have some on our street. Their front doors are all way up above the street (above the street-level garage), reachable only by a flight of stairs. Nothing but siding on them. A neighbor I'm friendly with calls them "beach houses"--which is perfect.
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Old 10-23-2015, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Chicago IL
472 posts, read 515,685 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlingtonian View Post
I think your last sentence is in jest--but I do worry what will happen in 20 or 30 years, when these things start falling apart. Or are simply not wanted, because they're neither charmingly old nor new and modern anymore.

I fear they'll be subdivided into apartments--or perhaps demolished to make way for something even larger.

We have some on our street. Their front doors are all way up above the street (above the street-level garage), reachable only by a flight of stairs. Nothing but siding on them. A neighbor I'm friendly with calls them "beach houses"--which is perfect.
Nothing wrong with a little humor thrown around. But I think you're on the money. Styles and tastes change, and turning them into a 3 flat apartment wouldn't surprise me.

It amazes me that an area that is on the more progressive side would be unopposed to 20 foot ceilings in the hallways and the customary all-purpose-room smack dead in the middle of the house that needs to be heated and cooled all year long. Talk about a waste.

I don't understand the front door on the second level. People seem to love those things in sterling. Been in one, and eh...
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Old 10-25-2015, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
3,311 posts, read 1,657,568 times
Reputation: 3580
I'm a huge fan of newer construction homes/apt. I will admit some "McMansions" look better than others. I like it when they are mixed into neighborhoods with other housing models. If there are miles and miles of just McMansions that don't look very different from one another, then I'm not as big on that. In general, I don't mind them though, and I prefer newer model homes.
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Old 10-26-2015, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Arlington, VA
420 posts, read 801,960 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Novamom3 View Post
An original older home has typically lower ceilings
To me, a low ceiling is desirable because it makes replacing light bulbs easier. Without a ladder, it may be difficult to reach a light bulb on a 10' ceiling if you were not 8' tall.
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Old 10-26-2015, 01:14 PM
 
2,185 posts, read 2,658,876 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Novamom3 View Post
AND there are as many old homes with no charm and cheap fixings as there are new ones.
This is so very true. The places where most of the redeveloping happens are areas like Arlington, Mclean, Vienna. Places where land is extremely valuable and there is none sitting around unused. And you're right, so many of the old homes don't have charm. And look very cookie cutter(two of the things mcmansions are criticized for). The style in the 50s was the raised rambler so in Vienna you just have crappy old raised ramblers for as far as the eye can see until someone bulldozes it and builds a new house. The only issue I have with the newer houses is when they try to cram too big of a house on the lot. Then it looks ridiculous. But it can and is done very tastefully a lot of times. And if the lot is big enough and can support the McMansion, then I say build your McMansion. It seems like the style in Vienna that's most often used is a craftsman style and a lot of them look really really good
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Old 10-26-2015, 01:21 PM
 
7,964 posts, read 9,715,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FCNova View Post
This is so very true. The places where most of the redeveloping happens are areas like Arlington, Mclean, Vienna. Places where land is extremely valuable and there is none sitting around unused. And you're right, so many of the old homes don't have charm. And look very cookie cutter(two of the things mcmansions are criticized for). The style in the 50s was the raised rambler so in Vienna you just have crappy old raised ramblers for as far as the eye can see until someone bulldozes it and builds a new house. The only issue I have with the newer houses is when they try to cram too big of a house on the lot. Then it looks ridiculous. But it can and is done very tastefully a lot of times. And if the lot is big enough and can support the McMansion, then I say build your McMansion. It seems like the style in Vienna that's most often used is a craftsman style and a lot of them look really really good
Everyone has different definitions.....I don't consider a home built in the 50s as "old"; and I also agree that those built then usually are devoid of charm.
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Old 10-26-2015, 01:23 PM
 
2,185 posts, read 2,658,876 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spencgr View Post
Everyone has different definitions.....I don't consider a home built in the 50s as "old"; and I also agree that those built then usually are devoid of charm.
A home built in 1950 is old. Not as old as a home built in 1925, but still old. And yeah homes of that vintage are generally butt ugly. Although I'll probably be living in one at some point because we're not moving away from Vienna and can't afford a McMansion
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Old 10-26-2015, 01:41 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,678 posts, read 23,258,366 times
Reputation: 48876
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Dissenter View Post
Trust me, I'm in no way jealous of a McMansion, as someone who lives in an old studio condo. Me personally, I appreciate character and provided I don't hit my head on the ceiling, I'm 6'5, I don't mind sacrificing newness or size for character. I just have a different taste than other people. I'd move into a row house with street parking on T St in DC before I would move into a McMansion in a subdivision in McLean.
You can say that you are not jealous, oh 500 times to a new house-McMansion advocate and it just does not register. They don't believe you.

To them, old is "bad" and new is "good".

They generally start with the attitude. Old home lovers do not. My cousin recently bragged that she and her husband "prefer quality new construction to anything used". That's downright rude, since she knows that I love my 1920s home.

So. I responded that "quality" and "new construction" were antithetical. No. I do not admire your vinyl shrink wrapped house in a subdivision of extremely similar large vinyl shrink wrapped pseudo colonials and Victorians on postage stamp properties with gaping three car garages.

If I did, I would live in one. And I hated the 10 years that I spent in "new construction".
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Old 10-26-2015, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
5,104 posts, read 5,399,275 times
Reputation: 12617
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
You can say that you are not jealous, oh 500 times to a new house-McMansion advocate and it just does not register. They don't believe you.

To them, old is "bad" and new is "good".

They generally start with the attitude. Old home lovers do not. My cousin recently bragged that she and her husband "prefer quality new construction to anything used". That's downright rude, since she knows that I love my 1920s home.

So. I responded that "quality" and "new construction" were antithetical. No. I do not admire your vinyl shrink wrapped house in a subdivision of extremely similar large vinyl shrink wrapped pseudo colonials and Victorians on postage stamp properties with gaping three car garages.

If I did, I would live in one. And I hated the 10 years that I spent in "new construction".
Pot calling the kettle black.

Why is your cousin stating their preference rude? Why can't you agree to have different preferences without trying to be offensive?
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Old 10-26-2015, 02:28 PM
 
7,964 posts, read 9,715,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
. My cousin recently bragged that she and her husband "prefer quality new construction to anything used". That's downright rude, since she knows that I love my 1920s home.
She stated an opinion. Just because it isn't your opinion, it doesn't make it rude.



Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
So. I responded that "quality" and "new construction" were antithetical.
These two things are not mutually incompatible. New construction absolutely can be quality; it's all about the builder. Most new construction is done quickly and is not of very high quality, but that doesn't mean it can't be; or that all new construction is low-quality.
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