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Old 01-28-2016, 05:47 PM
 
Location: New-Dentist Colony
5,739 posts, read 8,948,971 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JasperJade View Post
Not in public, no. If I had to clear my car out, I am assuming someone else will come along and take it because it's PUBLIC space that they paid for as much as I did.

However, when I lived in a gated community, management sent around flyers whenever it snowed for people to only park in the spaces they cleared out themselves. There was plenty of parking and no need to play musical spaces.
Yes, it's a public space--but when it's private citizens who render it usable on their own time, I think they are entitled to claim the sole benefit. In other words, I think it should cease to be public when it stops being publicly maintained.

I saw some news report about an older guy in DC who had cleaned out a spot near his home, which took him a long time. Should this old man have to clean out another spot later?
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Old 01-28-2016, 06:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlingtonian View Post
I saw some news report about an older guy in DC who had cleaned out a spot near his home, which took him a long time. Should this old man have to clean out another spot later?
Yes, it goes with the territory when living in the city. But, at the same time, I would hope people look out for the elderly if that guy is that age.
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Old 01-28-2016, 06:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ciscopress View Post
Yes, it goes with the territory when living in the city. But, at the same time, I would hope people look out for the elderly if that guy is that age.
You can't quote that post and not include the first part, because it makes total sense. Previous to someone digging out that spot, it wasn't usable.
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Old 01-28-2016, 07:05 PM
 
Location: New-Dentist Colony
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ciscopress View Post
Yes, it goes with the territory when living in the city. But, at the same time, I would hope people look out for the elderly if that guy is that age.
So this old man is supposed to dig a new spot every time he comes back from an errand? Really?

People can't look out for him if they don't know what spot is his. If they clear a spot for him and it's taken by someone else once he leaves, he's once again without a spot when he returns. It's not like there's an army of shovelers always at the ready whenever an older person is looking for a spot.

Putting older folks aside: Are we all supposed to clear a new spot every time we come back from somewhere in the aftermath of a snowstorm?

Wouldn't it be easier for everyone if we just honored the saved spot?
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Old 01-28-2016, 07:15 PM
 
7,931 posts, read 9,655,970 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlingtonian View Post
So this old man is supposed to dig a new spot every time he comes back from an errand? Really?

People can't look out for him if they don't know what spot is his. If they clear a spot for him and it's taken by someone else once he leaves, he's once again without a spot when he returns. It's not like there's an army of shovelers always at the ready whenever an older person is looking for a spot.

Putting older folks aside: Are we all supposed to clear a new spot every time we come back from somewhere in the aftermath of a snowstorm?

Wouldn't it be easier for everyone if we just honored the saved spot?
To my earlier post - what if you were out of town during the storm and didn't have the "opportunity" to dig your car out of a spot (because it wasn't in a spot)? Does that mean you can never park your car near your home again??

Last edited by spencgr; 01-28-2016 at 08:02 PM..
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Old 01-29-2016, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Metro Washington DC
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This issue will never be resolved unless they allow people to own their space. Until then there is no solution.
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Old 01-29-2016, 10:27 AM
 
Location: New-Dentist Colony
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spencgr View Post
To my earlier post - what if you were out of town during the storm and didn't have the "opportunity" to dig your car out of a spot (because it wasn't in a spot)? Does that mean you can never park your car near your home again??
I'm assuming you mean if I got home to find that someone else had cleared the spot and then parked in it. In my view and experience, that would violate the unwritten social contract in residential neighborhoods.

I think the latter is an important distinction. In urban areas, it's a free-for-all. In SFH neighborhoods (especially older ones, where garages are a rarity and not all homes even have a driveway), the universal practice is to park only in front of your own house. So the spot in front of each house, while officially public, is in practice treated as private--because it serves the interest of everyone living nearby. We all prefer to park in front of our own houses, so if everyone honors that, then everyone gets to enjoy that convenience. Obviously, that isn't possible when there are far more dwellings than on-street spots (as in cities).

And as to so-called public streets, let's remember that in many neighborhoods, street parking during certain hours requires a zone permit, making those spots off-limits to anyone not living in that neighborhood. This means the municipality is basically doing, on a wider basis, what individuals are doing with lawn chairs and flower pots.

Last edited by Carlingtonian; 01-29-2016 at 10:37 AM..
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Old 01-29-2016, 01:17 PM
 
7,931 posts, read 9,655,970 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlingtonian View Post
I'm assuming you mean if I got home to find that someone else had cleared the spot and then parked in it. In my view and experience, that would violate the unwritten social contract in residential neighborhoods.

I think the latter is an important distinction. In urban areas, it's a free-for-all. In SFH neighborhoods (especially older ones, where garages are a rarity and not all homes even have a driveway), the universal practice is to park only in front of your own house. So the spot in front of each house, while officially public, is in practice treated as private--because it serves the interest of everyone living nearby. We all prefer to park in front of our own houses, so if everyone honors that, then everyone gets to enjoy that convenience. Obviously, that isn't possible when there are far more dwellings than on-street spots (as in cities).

And as to so-called public streets, let's remember that in many neighborhoods, street parking during certain hours requires a zone permit, making those spots off-limits to anyone not living in that neighborhood. This means the municipality is basically doing, on a wider basis, what individuals are doing with lawn chairs and flower pots.
My example was for an urban environment. Where all spots are normally occupied at night. Where is that person supposed to park when he returns?
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Old 01-29-2016, 02:19 PM
 
232 posts, read 293,495 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlingtonian View Post
In SFH neighborhoods (especially older ones, where garages are a rarity and not all homes even have a driveway), the universal practice is to park only in front of your own house. So the spot in front of each house, while officially public, is in practice treated as private--because it serves the interest of everyone living nearby.
Not my neighborhood. Although all SFH near me have garages, the number of times that people park in front of my house (instead of the one they are staying at and/or visiting) is amazing. There does not seem to be the common respect that the street in front of the house is still for "that" house. Wish more people did...if only for making it easier for me to get in/out of my driveway.

But for the whole topic of the cleared space, unless someone specifically was watching and waiting to snatch a spot as soon as it is cleared, still do not see where anyone would believe they could leave and come back to the same spot. Especially during this kind of snow event where any parking is at a premium. Would say that it might make sense to coordinate with neighbors who might be able to "move into" that spot until your return. Otherwise, while I understand the frustration at the extra work, don't think it will ever be reasonable to expect that someone calls "dibs" on a spot.
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Old 01-29-2016, 02:36 PM
 
Location: New-Dentist Colony
5,739 posts, read 8,948,971 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spencgr View Post
My example was for an urban environment. Where all spots are normally occupied at night. Where is that person supposed to park when he returns?
Ah--OK, I think I follow now. It's an urban street, and you're outta town. You come back, and all the spots are cleared and occupied by either cars or lawn chairs. I guess in that scenario, the only option is to park somewhere farther away until the snow melts.
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