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Old 02-12-2016, 09:19 AM
 
11 posts, read 6,152 times
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I've told that the lifespan for each house structure type is different. I am puzzled. Can someone shed me some light on this subject?

1) I've seen the house structure by wood and aluminum (not sure if it is aluminum, it looks like it, and it's metal, definitely not wood). I think they have different lifespan, not sure which one is longer than the other.

2) If the house was built in '86 and "metal" structure - can it last for another 18 or 24 years? Worth to remodel the house and keep up with it? I don't mind about other stuff like drywalls, gas pipe, HVAC unit, etc, I think those have shorter lifespan than the house structure and expect to replace/repair over the years.

P.S. The house is in Northern VA (if it's matter)

Thanks!
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Old 02-12-2016, 09:54 AM
 
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If it was made correctly, I have never heard that there is a "lifespan" for the actual structure of the house.......well, unless, of course, it was made out of mud or straw.
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Old 02-12-2016, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Boydton, VA
2,438 posts, read 3,093,825 times
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"well, unless, of course, it was made out of mud or straw."....even those structures will last....as long as they are kept dry. I have an adobe house in AZ that was built in 1940, adobe is among other things, mud and straw.

That aside, it all boils down to the care a structure receives....there are plenty of structures in VA that were built in the 1700's and are still functional...others built in the 1900's that are not. Maintenance and preventive maintenance are critical to the lifespan of a building...excessive moisture will eventually shorten the lifespan of any building material....and sooner or later a point will be reached where repair will become too costly...and replace will be the best option.

Regards
Gemstone1
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Old 02-12-2016, 10:56 AM
 
529 posts, read 546,868 times
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You probably need to worry something that's built recently as the quality is not so great as the ones built 20-30-40 years ago.

It all depends on how good the foundation of the house is. It generally lasts 80-100 years or more if properly built/maintained.
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Old 02-12-2016, 11:13 AM
 
2,185 posts, read 2,658,374 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vecon20 View Post
I've told that the lifespan for each house structure type is different. I am puzzled.
Who told you this? I'd be curious to know their reasoning and how they came to the lifespans. Are you looking at IRS or accounting guidelines that tell you useful lives for depreciation purposes? This is just for tax and/or bookkeeping purposes. In actuality houses can last almost forever if properly maintained, although eventually you will probably have costly repairs repairing/maintaining the structure or foundation.
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Old 02-12-2016, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Virginia-Shenandoah Valley
6,585 posts, read 10,896,400 times
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Well this is a first.
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Old 02-12-2016, 01:05 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,896 posts, read 42,133,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigfoot424 View Post
Well this is a first.


Well, maybe.


There was a thread a few months ago in Real Estate from a guy worried about buying an "ancient" house built in.................... 1998. He was concerned about collapsing walls and what not since it was so old.
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Old 02-12-2016, 02:03 PM
 
948 posts, read 674,361 times
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Are you talking about a prefab mobile home? Is that what you mean by metal?
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Old 02-12-2016, 03:43 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, VA
11,419 posts, read 20,270,607 times
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I think it's a first-time homeowner just throwing things out there
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Old 02-12-2016, 03:50 PM
 
230 posts, read 188,338 times
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How about a stone house. They seem like they last a long time.
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