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Old 04-26-2019, 07:13 AM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,743 posts, read 10,653,617 times
Reputation: 2479

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Quote:
Originally Posted by EmiSky View Post
The mass exodus from Greater Washington continues. And it got worse last year.

"The number of people leaving continues to dwarf the number of people moving here, according to data from July 1, 2017, to July 1, 2018, from the Stephen S. Fuller Institute at George Mason University's Schar School of Policy and Government. About 30,600 more people moved away than moved here during that time, a concept called “net domestic out-migration.”

When the mass in migration was happening, people said "its not sustainable, its because we have a strong job market and the rest of the country has a weaker job market"

Now that its reversing, to some degree, instead of saying that is because the rest of country now has a stronger job market, people are blaming immigrants. Feh.
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Old 05-01-2019, 07:31 AM
 
164 posts, read 77,960 times
Reputation: 258
Wow, when I wrote the below statement I didn't know how right I was! I just made the statements from my observations, what I was seeing from my commuter bus while the kids were being dropped off by a school bus.

"I worked in Crystal City (until yesterday as luckily my employer is moving to another location), and when commuting home I sometimes was stuck behind a school bus. All the kids that were dropped off, that I saw, were of the Middle Eastern decent or other nationalities, judging by their parents traditional attire. And I realize that this isn't PC thing to discuss, but the fact is that there are many children who crossed the border illegally in the past few yrs., have been scattered throughout the U.S. I'm sure some of them ended up in Arlington as well as my county. So someone must pay for their schooling."

This article shows that it wasn't just my imagination.

One of the most backlogged immigration courts in America is in Arlington

"Latest local figures from February 2019 show Arlington immigration court has a backlog of more than 44,000 cases. Baltimore is not far behind with more than 37,000 backlogged cases. Numbers from 2017 have Arlington as the 5th most backlogged immigration court in the country. "

https://wjla.com/features/7-on-your-...s-in-arlington

So yes, looks like this could help to explain the increase in property taxes in Arlington; an increase for school budget. Sorry Amazon, for trying to blame you for this!
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Old 05-01-2019, 10:06 AM
 
2,669 posts, read 4,510,798 times
Reputation: 2117
The surge in school enrollment has come from legal residents, many of whom are white. Please stop with the baseless accusations.
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Old 05-01-2019, 02:27 PM
 
164 posts, read 77,960 times
Reputation: 258
According to the article, "Because APS enrollment is growing so much more quickly than Arlington’s overall population, that means more students per taxpayer, which means higher taxes if there are no significant changes in the ways in which APS operates its schools."


Peter’s Take: County Budget Deal Defers APS Budget Problems
https://www.arlnow.com/2019/05/01/pe...dget-problems/


"Last week, the County Board adopted its FY2020 budget. The County Board approved a 2-cent increase in the real estate tax rate, effective January 1, 2019. The Board earmarked 1.5 cents of that tax rate increase for Arlington Public Schools (APS).

APS long-range operating budget remains unsustainable without significant tax rate increases.

APS currently projects that school enrollment will increase 24.6% over the next decade.
Last year, the APS Advisory Council on School Facilities and Capital Programs (FAC) prepared an excellent report on future school facilities’ needs. That report was prepared prior to the latest APS enrollment projections. But, even without the benefit of those new projections, the FAC report systematically and correctly documents that APS continuously is going to be opening new schools throughout the next decade and beyond to educate this large body of new students.

As other posters have pointed out, there are many empty nesters and young individuals living in Arlington who do not have children, so how does one explain the vast increase for schools.
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Old 05-01-2019, 02:36 PM
 
164 posts, read 77,960 times
Reputation: 258
Quote:
Originally Posted by ACWhite View Post
The surge in school enrollment has come from legal residents, many of whom are white. Please stop with the baseless accusations.
What baseless accusations?! What's baseless about this? "The latest local figures from February 2019 show Arlington immigration court has a backlog of more than 44,000 cases". I didn't make up those numbers! In fact, I'm stunned how high the number is. If all these people immigrated here legally then they wouldn't need to go through immigration court. I waited yrs./my turn before I could immigrate to U.S. I came here legally so there was no need for me to go through immigration court. Given the fact that the immigration court in Arlington is so backed up, it shows that majority of it's immigrants came here illegally and/or overstayed their visas.
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Old 05-01-2019, 06:27 PM
 
Location: Arlington, VA
1,430 posts, read 3,475,174 times
Reputation: 773
Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
When the mass in migration was happening, people said "its not sustainable, its because we have a strong job market and the rest of the country has a weaker job market"

Now that its reversing, to some degree, instead of saying that is because the rest of country now has a stronger job market, people are blaming immigrants. Feh.
That article was also poorly written- I appreciate the economic enthusiasm from Fuller's group but you rarely read any positive news from them unless we are adding 100k plus a year in people and in jobs. Despite the decline in domestic migration, this area still had the 10th largest numeric increase in population in the country. 50k in the past year and about 600k since 2010. This has always been a transient area, add in some of our migration flows out to counties that are still commutable but not considered as in our metro area (Frederick Va, Berkeley Wv, Washington Md, Howard Md, Anne Arundel Etc) and the domestic losses are even less.
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Old 05-02-2019, 06:22 AM
 
Location: Beautiful and sanitary DC
1,479 posts, read 2,148,652 times
Reputation: 1369
1. Arlington has not been alone in finding that many young families would rather stay closer in, rather than move out to the distant suburbs. Hence, school systems all across the core of the region have all been surprised by student growth, including DC (which is racing to reopen schools that had been scheduled to be sold off), Montgomery (which has even put moratoriums on new apartments), and even in northern Prince George's.

2. Immigration courts are backlogged everywhere. That the local courts are backlogged is not newsworthy.
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Old 05-02-2019, 06:41 AM
 
164 posts, read 66,290 times
Reputation: 299
The DC metro area was never designed to accommodate all the people living there now -- the founding fathers would have never wanted a bloated central government. Baltimore should still be the bigger city of the region but it has been striped off its productivity as DC bloats.
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Old 05-02-2019, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Beautiful and sanitary DC
1,479 posts, read 2,148,652 times
Reputation: 1369
Of course, nobody in 1790 thought that one million people would be a somewhat-large city (the entire country had fewer than four million), BUT the DC metro area absolutely was intended to be the country's largest city, and both L'Enfant and Washington forecast that it would have over a million residents.

(Remember that Washington had a vested interest in its urban growth, as one of the largest landowners in the Potomac basin and a key investor in the Patowmack canal.)

Quote:
The resulting L'Enfant Plan of 1791 encompassed 20,272 building lots, at a time when the country's largest cities had but several thousand houses. The overall District was vast by urban standards of the day, even without the section subsequently retroceded to Virginia; today's District has 39,072 acres of land.

DC's area dwarfed the then-newly designated "metropolis" of London, which as of an 1801 census spanned 30,002 acres and counted 864,035 residents — long before elevators, railroads, or even sanitary sewers made high-density living more comfortable and healthful. It was then by far the largest city in Europe and the second-largest city in the world, after Beijing. https://ggwash.org/view/66684/one-mi...ce-not-to-fear
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Old 05-03-2019, 09:53 AM
 
49 posts, read 17,474 times
Reputation: 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by paytonc View Post
Of course, nobody in 1790 thought that one million people would be a somewhat-large city (the entire country had fewer than four million), BUT the DC metro area absolutely was intended to be the country's largest city, and both L'Enfant and Washington forecast that it would have over a million residents.

(Remember that Washington had a vested interest in its urban growth, as one of the largest landowners in the Potomac basin and a key investor in the Patowmack canal.)
Interesting... You learn new things everyday...

I am the type to embrace and look forward to growth, - especially in the capital.
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