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Old 08-31-2009, 07:21 AM
 
715 posts, read 1,866,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by changyai View Post
My nephew majored in English Literature--an honor student from a fine "Christian" college. It took him a year to get a job--with his mother's company, no less. He won the Physics competition as a HS Junior, but got some very bad advice from some very well intentioned people.
Even physics majors have it tough now, with just a BS, unless they can find a government job.
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Old 08-31-2009, 07:25 AM
 
715 posts, read 1,866,128 times
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Originally Posted by claremarie View Post
"And that where my "board scores and good work experience" comes in...along with networking and family connections."

Top law schools care about LSAT scores and grades. Work experience, networking, and family connections (unless your family's name is on a campus building) count for very little in law school admissions. Any rigorous major is acceptable, which is why there are lots of philosophy, history, and classics majors in law school.
There are many paths to personal and professional success. It's not a narrow tunnel reserved for engineering, accounting, and economics majors.
When did philosophy, history, and classics become a "rigorous major?"

All those who majored in these subjects relaxed on the quad during finals, while the "non flaky" majors actually had to study.

I agree that there are many paths to personal and professional success, but that path is made "easier" with a more "valuable" and "marketable" and "in demand" degree.
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Old 08-31-2009, 07:27 AM
 
715 posts, read 1,866,128 times
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Originally Posted by Ashburnite View Post
I don't understand why this issue continues to be an argument. People get degrees in all kinds of fields, get jobs in all kinds of fields, make different levels of money, and are happy in a variety of jobs. A degree is just a degree - what you do with it and yourself is what is important. Money isn't the number one priority for everyone and many people (when the overall economy isn't in the tank) make a good living at their job. Not everyone will be an engineer, lawyer, or doctor or hold a job where the name is recognizable to you. The colleges where degrees are earned employ thousands of people, all who have the potential to make decent money and be happy with their jobs. You simply may not have noticed their existence and the value they added to your degree process.

Furthermore, someone with two bachelors degrees - one in political science and one in emergency administration and planning - can get a job and earn a good salary doing a job that never occurred to someone else that it even existed.

College can train you in book learning and show a student how things are done but actually doing the job teaches a person so much more.
I think I've already answered these points. No need to repeat myself.
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Old 08-31-2009, 07:30 AM
 
Location: Ashburn, VA
577 posts, read 1,783,963 times
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Originally Posted by live_strong28 View Post
I think I've already answered these points. No need to repeat myself.
But I'm sure you will since you seem to enjoy arguing about everything.
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Old 08-31-2009, 07:35 AM
 
715 posts, read 1,866,128 times
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Originally Posted by Ashburnite View Post
But I'm sure you will since you seem to enjoy arguing about everything.
I think I've already proven my point.

Most lucrative college majors - highest starting salaries - Jul. 24, 2009


"What happened to well-rounded? There are far fewer people graduating with math-based majors, compared to their liberal-arts counterparts, which is why they are paid at such a premium. The fields of engineering and computer science each make up about 4% of all college graduates, while social science and history each comprise 16%, Koc noted.

As a result, salaries for graduates who studied fields like social work command tiny paychecks, somewhere in the vicinity of $29,000. English, foreign language and communications majors make about $35,000, Koc said.


"It's a supply and demand issue," he added. "So few grads offer math skills, and those who can are rewarded." "
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Old 08-31-2009, 08:01 AM
 
2,462 posts, read 8,042,400 times
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"When did philosophy, history, and classics become a "rigorous major?" "

You ARE kidding, right?
Taught by competent professors at demanding colleges, these fields are the backbone of a solid liberal arts education. They require high-level reading, writing and analytical skills that, sadly, many college students simply don't have.
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Old 09-03-2009, 09:08 PM
 
715 posts, read 1,866,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by claremarie View Post
"When did philosophy, history, and classics become a "rigorous major?" "

You ARE kidding, right?
Taught by competent professors at demanding colleges, these fields are the backbone of a solid liberal arts education. They require high-level reading, writing and analytical skills that, sadly, many college students simply don't have.
I suppose what is rigorous to some isn't rigorous to others.

You ask a liberal arts major why he didn't major in eng, math, or science, and he/she will say the math is too tough.

You ask an eng., math, or science major why he/she didn't get a liberal arts degree and he/she will say it doesn't pay enough/can't get a job.
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Old 09-03-2009, 09:20 PM
 
5,071 posts, read 8,616,501 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by claremarie View Post
"When did philosophy, history, and classics become a "rigorous major?" "

You ARE kidding, right?
Taught by competent professors at demanding colleges, these fields are the backbone of a solid liberal arts education. They require high-level reading, writing and analytical skills that, sadly, many college students simply don't have.
It really varies from school to school. At the university I attended, sociology, psychology and civil (as opposed to chemical, mechanical/aerospace or electrical) engineering were considered relatively non-demanding majors. The philosophy and classics departments were small and the undergraduate programs were quite rigorous.
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Old 09-03-2009, 09:43 PM
 
715 posts, read 1,866,128 times
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Let's assume philosophy, classics, engineering, math, science, etc. were all equally rigorous. The next question would be, what is the "cost-benefit?"

Most lucrative college majors - highest starting salaries - Jul. 24, 2009
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Old 09-03-2009, 11:12 PM
 
3,164 posts, read 6,118,809 times
Reputation: 1264
Quote:
Originally Posted by claremarie View Post
"When did philosophy, history, and classics become a "rigorous major?" "

You ARE kidding, right?
Taught by competent professors at demanding colleges, these fields are the backbone of a solid liberal arts education. They require high-level reading, writing and analytical skills that, sadly, many college students simply don't have.
If they are so rigorous, why are there so many students who graduate in those fields? And why are they, sadly, still unable to write?
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