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Old 07-20-2012, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,989,181 times
Reputation: 6824

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I don't find people here particularly snobby. Most come from very middle class backgrounds and seem to reflect values common to that station in society. Pedestrian would be a better descriptor.
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Old 07-20-2012, 08:03 PM
 
2,688 posts, read 5,946,885 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
Most come from very middle class backgrounds and seem to reflect values common to that station in society. Pedestrian would be a better descriptor.
Quite true.

Regarding cars, I don't care much about them but I've noticed that a lot of people who grew up in lower-middle-class or lower-income families and were the first in their families to go to college like to indulge in an expensive car or two once they're settled into a good career. Maybe they grew up seeing that as a sign of success and so it means a lot to them, especially considering all the time we spend in our cars here. As long as they're generally responsible financially and can afford it, it's a harmless indulgence.
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Old 07-20-2012, 09:20 PM
 
49 posts, read 67,277 times
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Having lived here for a year, I don't think people are snobby. But, they are not overly friendly like some regions. And they are mostly busy like crazy, working to pay for expensive houses and lots of fun, but costly activities. it's suburban living at an urban pace.
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Old 07-20-2012, 10:39 PM
 
2,688 posts, read 5,946,885 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cdrmike View Post
it's suburban living at an urban pace.
Good observation.
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Old 07-20-2012, 11:13 PM
 
3,503 posts, read 7,909,907 times
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Interesting takes on how to live and spend money. I used to be very conservative until my Mother got old and sick - she had two health insurances from her job and my late Fathers job - but she had to go through Medicare first - it is very hard to find good Doctors that accept Medicare. My Mother had a big bank account, investments, ss, dividends, and 2 large pensions coming in - but a good nursing home costs around $15,000 a month - if she did not pass when she did she would have went through all her money and if we could not afford to pay be moved to a cruddy Medicade nursing home.

What I am saying is - live it up because most of us will be poor in the end no matter what we do.
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Old 07-21-2012, 08:37 AM
 
968 posts, read 1,438,353 times
Reputation: 638
Quote:
Originally Posted by midlifeman View Post
You sound like a snob to me. Your saying that your lifestyle is better than someone who happens to spend money. Just because you live within your means doesn't make you a better person than the girl who goes out buys $80 shoes every month... Some people consume life others never really live.

I am a consumer of life and without us, there would be no economy.
Reading comprehension: I never said I was better, nor did I say my lifestyle was better, than anyone else. But the topic of materialism (such as nice cars and big houses) came up, and I was offering up that I think many in this area live beyond their means in order to be perceived as "affluent," which sometimes comes across as "snobby." Also relates to, as someone else previously mentioned, keeping up with the Joneses.

I "consume" plenty. Just because I don't spend money I don't have (outside of financing a home purchase) doesn't mean I'm killing the economy

I don't consider spending money essential to "living life." I just lost my father very recently and very suddenly/unexpectedly. He was 59 and healthy. It's hard enough dealing with the loss of a parent and all the planning and coordinating and emotional upheaval that comes with it; I'm glad he didn't leave us piles of debt to manage as well, despite having only ever worked in hourly manual labor type positions and never having earned in excess of $35k annually.

I don't think it's "snobby" to buy $80+ shoes. I think it's snobby to look down on someone else who only buys <$30 shoes, and I've encountered both of these types of people EVERYWHERE, not just in northern Virginia.
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Old 07-21-2012, 12:27 PM
 
Location: NoVA/DC
84 posts, read 192,893 times
Reputation: 55
I'm too snobby to grace this thread with my fascinating opinion.

Except to say most snobby people are unaware of their pretentiousness.



Except me.
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Old 07-21-2012, 02:44 PM
 
1,403 posts, read 1,846,049 times
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It's always strange to me that some people define wealth as ability to buy luxury goods (oh and by the way $80 pairs of shoes are not luxury -- try $800 a pair and up). I have always measured wealth as one's ability to live without having to earn income, especially wage income -- being a gentleman or a lady of leisure if you will.

I also find odd the notion that one should consume with abandon since our end-of-life care may cost substantially (that's all the more reason to save and invest, in my view, rather than spend).

In any case, despite the reputation of Northern Virginia as a place inundated with luxury cars and McMansions, I actually find this area perhaps the least showy mass affluent area in the United States. Neighborhoods and houses here may be "plastic-y," but certainly people aren't.
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Old 07-21-2012, 03:02 PM
 
813 posts, read 1,103,584 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IndiaLimaDelta View Post
$80 shoes? Where is this, K-Mart?
No silly, it's Walmart and their designer line of Jimmy Ahchoo shoes!
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Old 07-21-2012, 04:05 PM
 
2,688 posts, read 5,946,885 times
Reputation: 1288
Quote:
Originally Posted by jillybean720 View Post
Reading comprehension:I just lost my father very recently and very suddenly/unexpectedly. He was 59 and healthy. It's hard enough dealing with the loss of a parent and all the planning and coordinating and emotional upheaval that comes with it; I'm glad he didn't leave us piles of debt to manage as well, despite having only ever worked in hourly manual labor type positions and never having earned in excess of $35k annually.
Good for him. I'm sorry about your loss.
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