U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Virginia > Northern Virginia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 03-16-2009, 07:00 PM
 
73 posts, read 173,459 times
Reputation: 16

Advertisements

Some parents don't realize that 9th grade course selection is pre-determined by the classes their child takes in middle school. People don't want to believe that there is different "tracks" for students but there are. You do not want your child stuck in the lower or middle track -- those classes will be filled with kids who are not motivated with behavior issues. Heck, I see them everyday so I know some of the kids heading into the high schools. I would not want my child in their classes.

Yes, the schools are very into their test scores. They do so much to try to raise them. We are entering the SOL remediation time-frame were we will be intensively trying to get those borderline students more help so they will pass the SOL.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-16-2009, 09:07 PM
 
85 posts, read 168,027 times
Reputation: 19
This is a little off topic, but school/education related. Do NOVA schools have AVID programs?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-16-2009, 11:06 PM
 
229 posts, read 530,404 times
Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by nwlv View Post
I think that in the classess with a high percentage of ESL students, the teachers are frustrated and overwhelmed. Even the average kids are kind of forgotten about. The ESL students are sucking resources from the taxpayers at an alarming rate. Many of them are here illegally, and the schools refuse to crack down, because they fear lawsuits. Even though, they know good and well, about the overcrowded, multi-family, residences, many of these students live in.
Amen.

Add also that poor kids also get free summer school while other parents not deemed poor have to pay out of pocket for camps and summer school.

The "poorer" areas of NoVA all have all day kindergarten, while the "wealthier" areas of NoVA still haven't had full day kindergarten phased in yet.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-16-2009, 11:13 PM
 
229 posts, read 530,404 times
Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by becwells View Post
Ha. This is very interesting to me. It seems that the whole "my school is better than your school" is a hot topic in this area, which is strange to me given the overall high caliber of the schools. I mean, my husband and I would love to relocate to Chicago, but the quality of schools there is pitiful compared to what's available in NoVA. I don't know if parents here really realize just how good they've got it when it comes to finding a school for their kids - the choices here are far superior to most of the country, and I find it bordering on ridiculous how competitive and picky they can get. Then again, what else is to be expected in such a wealthy area?
That's an interesting point.

If you look at the "worse school" in FFX Cty, it's either Falls Church or Annandale. Both schools have test scores at or above the state average.

Now, if you checked out the worse schools in DC and/or PG County, the worse schools would be well below the state average.

I find it silly and stupid when PG and the news media get all in a tizzy because PG's test scores have increased, let's say 10% while FFX has "only" increased by, let's say, 3%. Well, 10% of a previous score of 50 for PG is still sad compared to a 3% of a previous score of 80.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-16-2009, 11:15 PM
 
229 posts, read 530,404 times
Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by nwlv View Post
I've encountered large numbers of families that were multi-generational sharing a house with another multi-generational family. Some of these folks make their kids speak Spanish in the home, further increasing their burden on the taxpayers.
That's when you need to do your civic duty and get on this webpage:

Zoning/Noise Ordinance Complaint Reporting Form - Fairfax County, Virginia
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-17-2009, 01:11 AM
 
Location: James Island, SC
1,628 posts, read 2,413,631 times
Reputation: 921
Quote:
Originally Posted by sls76 View Post
The schools with excellent reputations generally pull from afluent, highly educated populations. IMO that translates into very involved parents who volunteer their time and money. These schools get a lot of free highly skilled labor and obviously it's easier to attract good teachers into these environments.

I don't have kids, but I have worked with many kids as a mental health clinician.

In my experience, affluent = spoiled kids who are just as disruptive as ESL students, because they don't give a crap about grades, only who is wearing which labels. Arlington breeds these kids. Lawyer parents who work insane hours and throw money at their kids to make up for it.

In downtown D.C., parents are uninvolved for a different reason - they either have to work too much just to make ends meet, or they don't trust counselors.

Given a choice, I'd rather deal with the latter - at least they come by their attitudes honestly.

As far as involvement, it is the parents of white students who have time to volunteer in schools, because they can afford to. I can only imagine this makes the minority students (children of immigrants, etc.) feel even more left out.


FYI - Lest you think I'm biased, I am white.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-17-2009, 04:16 AM
 
80 posts, read 214,923 times
Reputation: 33
I went to school in the 90's. What you hear about the "tracks" is correct. My middle school had one 8th grade algebra class and I wasn't deemed "good enough" to be in it. So what did the school do? In the 7th grade they put me into a pre-algebra class and in the 8th grade they put me into (because I wasn't "good enough") pre-algebra again! Now keep in mind that I did fine in the 7th grade class. I didn't fail or anything. I got A's and B's. In my 8th grade pre-algebra class I sat in class doing my homework while the teacher taught then slept the rest of the class because I already knew the curriculum.

When I got into high school, I looked at the math classes available and saw there was a 12th grade AP Calculus class. I decided that I wanted to take it but then realized that there were 5 (yes FIVE) prerequisite classes in order to take Calculus! These classes were (in this order) Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2, Trigonometry, and Pre-Calculus. The kids that had Algebra in middle school were able to jump right into geometry in the 9th grade. They had to double up on their Junior year and take Trigonometry and Pre-Calc the same year to get into calculus in the 12th grade. I on the other hand was stuck on the "average" track. I had to convince the counciler (and others) that I would be okay doubling up TWO YEARS in a row on math to get into calculus. The thing is, they didn't want to let me but I insisted. If I had been in "regular math" for the 8th grade (as opposed to pre-algebra), they would have wanted me to take pre-algebra in the 9th grade!

You really do have to fight to get your kids into good classes as soon as you can. Intuitively, you wouldn't think that middle school would play that large a role in what your children do in high school but in reality it makes a huge difference.

Oh, one other thing, honors classes = good. My science teacher in middle school refused to sign off on a form saying I could go into honors science in the 9th grade (because I kept my head down and was not "advanced" enough). Well, my science class in the 9th grade was full of problem kids and those that did not want to learn. The class basically consisted of the teacher handing out a worksheet that was (literally) taken word for word from the text book. The student would then go through the text book chapter (supposedly) reading and filling in the blanks. The "tests" were basically the same thing. It was a joke. As a student in the 9th grade, I could tell it wasn't even worth my time to show up to class. What did I do? I refused to continue on their track. When going into the 10th grade, I got all my teachers to sign off on moving me into the more advanced classes because I thought (I know, it's a novel idea) it would be a good idea to actually LEARN at school. Once I was out of the "regular" classes, I started to learn more and was more challenged. you have to realize that these schools are the councilers at them do not care about your kids. They care about their scores. I saw the school councilers once a year and that was (supposedly) to help me chose my classes. That was it!

I find it no wonder that most college students spend 5 or 6 years there now. The high schools are doing everything they can to screw up the education system for everyone. We shouldn't have science classes with fill in the blank class assignments every day (and unlimited extra credit word search's - yes, there were word search worksheets where you circle words - find them all and you get extra credit. I finished each semester in that science class with a 115% score!). IMO, all the schools should have is the advanced classes. If kids don't want to be in the advanced classes and they are not there to learn, kick them out. Seriously, put them to work. Why should we have a bunch of 15 and 16 year old kids in our schools bringing down the system for everyone. I'm not saying that everyone should take calculus in high school but I am saying that if you can't take a science class that forces you to learn and actively perform experiements then you need to get the heck out of the school (same is true for English, History, and other subjects).
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-17-2009, 05:50 AM
 
Location: Virginia (again)
2,442 posts, read 5,443,028 times
Reputation: 1444
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mearth View Post
I don't have kids, but I have worked with many kids as a mental health clinician.

In my experience, affluent = spoiled kids who are just as disruptive as ESL students, because they don't give a crap about grades, only who is wearing which labels. Arlington breeds these kids. Lawyer parents who work insane hours and throw money at their kids to make up for it.

In downtown D.C., parents are uninvolved for a different reason - they either have to work too much just to make ends meet, or they don't trust counselors.

Given a choice, I'd rather deal with the latter - at least they come by their attitudes honestly.

As far as involvement, it is the parents of white students who have time to volunteer in schools, because they can afford to. I can only imagine this makes the minority students (children of immigrants, etc.) feel even more left out.


FYI - Lest you think I'm biased, I am white.
Affluent kids "don't give a crap about grades"? I highly doubt you've spent much time in a top high school. The kids care a lot about grades and getting into the right college.

If only stay at home moms would stop volunteering at their children's schools so the minority students don't feel left out.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-17-2009, 06:16 AM
 
2,439 posts, read 6,027,178 times
Reputation: 904
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mearth View Post
I don't have kids, but I have worked with many kids as a mental health clinician.

In my experience, affluent = spoiled kids who are just as disruptive as ESL students, because they don't give a crap about grades, only who is wearing which labels. Arlington breeds these kids. Lawyer parents who work insane hours and throw money at their kids to make up for it.

In downtown D.C., parents are uninvolved for a different reason - they either have to work too much just to make ends meet, or they don't trust counselors.

Given a choice, I'd rather deal with the latter - at least they come by their attitudes honestly.

As far as involvement, it is the parents of white students who have time to volunteer in schools, because they can afford to. I can only imagine this makes the minority students (children of immigrants, etc.) feel even more left out.


FYI - Lest you think I'm biased, I am white.
You are biased, because you are basing your sweeping generalizations on an extremely small sample of non-randomly selected students and their families -- the ones who come on the radar screen of the "mental health clinician."
Of course, it's much easier to deal with poor and ignorant mostly single parents of troubled students rather than the afffluent and educated mostly married parents of troubled students. The former are probably intimidated by someone who is a "mental health clinician" while the latter are not.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-17-2009, 07:36 AM
 
Location: Censorshipville...
2,439 posts, read 3,843,748 times
Reputation: 1199
I don't know if you can blame the school 100% on how the kids end up. A lot of it is on how seriously the kids take school. If they make that mental choice to succeed, they will. The person who posted about her daughter getting make-up in class, I'm certain no one held her down and applied the make-up forcefully. She made the mental choice to goof off too.

Kudos to typical guy to taking the initiative and changing the direction his school was taking him. I have a similar story where a teacher pushed me to take an AP class that I didn't want to. I did really well in math, but I was behind one class to be able to take Calculus in my senior year. My math teacher recognized that I could get into Calculus if only I doubled up math courses. I didn't think I could handle it, but she encouraged me to try and she thought I could. Well I have to say it was tough but I had a math course for 3rd and 4th period and passed both courses. This was at Potomac High School, so there are teachers out there willing to challenge their kids, even though we're not in the fabled FFX county...
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Virginia > Northern Virginia

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top