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Old 07-06-2009, 03:24 PM
 
715 posts, read 1,866,444 times
Reputation: 99

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Quote:
Originally Posted by VRE332 View Post
Yea maybe it was one of those cash bars, could have been a missile or a republican's lips lying going mach 1 . You never know
Here's some news for you. All politicians lie. Case in point Slick Willy.
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Old 07-06-2009, 03:26 PM
 
715 posts, read 1,866,444 times
Reputation: 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by DustyButt View Post
So lemme get this straight...

If there's an auto accident which results in the fuel tank on a car exploding, you tell people a car bomb went off? Interesting.

Also within the past two years there have been attacks. I don't feel like looking them all up but here's one from last year...

Small explosion hits New York's Times Square

Not to mention the shootings at an immigration center, the abortion shootings, etc.
You can list a number of small incidents that are probably no worse than a drive by shooting in the hood with regard to the number of casualties.

Can you provide an example of a large scale casualty attack caused by Al Qaeda of which they favor?
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Old 07-06-2009, 04:23 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
30,103 posts, read 67,204,935 times
Reputation: 15753
I happen to be employed as an auditor of defense contractors and work in a building in Tyson's Corner (or is it McLean? or is it Fairfax County? or is it the Seventh Layer of Hell?) adjacent to SAIC, and I can truly tell you that not all government contractors and/or Department of Defense employees are "lazy." On the contrary my audit team is very devoted to helping to save tax payers money through our "findings," some of which would shock and repulse some fiscally conservative types like myself.

I go into work normally for 6:30 AM and leave around 3 PM. We are afforded 30 minutes for lunch, but I normally just take 15 minutes and work through the other half of my lunch. I don't take breaks. Why? I feel blessed to be afforded this opportunity to serve my country (because Lord knows I couldn't serve in the military, but that's for a different political rant), and each day I walk into my building hoping to make a difference! It's a WISE investment on the behalf of the American tax payer if you pay me $40,000 annually to save the country $100,000 annually (net tax payer savings of $60,000).

I won't disclose WHICH contractor I happen to audit, as I am privvy to secure and classified information that I refuse to ever divulge, but from what I can tell every employee there whom I've had correspondence with has been very helpful, vigilant, and committed to their work. I've only been with my agency for roughly a month, but in that time I feel like I'm really trying to invest 110% effort! The learning curve is EXTREME for new hires with my particular specialty, but after a few years as my experience level and responsibilities rise I'll certainly be much more capable of helping to save YOU, the tax payer, money!
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Old 07-06-2009, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Mountain View, CA
1,152 posts, read 2,845,197 times
Reputation: 1056
Of course it's not "welfare." Yes, the government procurement system is cumbersome, and is in some ways inefficient, but it's all a tradeoff. More regulation and checks means less efficiency. You could streamline the process, but that means less oversight and regulation, which make abuse more possible. And actually, MOST large institutional purchases are fairly cumbersome. Anytime you start talking about six figures or more of money being spent on one contract, the process becomes slower but safer. This is true even for consumers - compare buying a computer to buying a house.

Is there waste in the contracting industry? I'm sure. But there's waste everywhere. I'm sure in any large corporation and in plenty of small ones too, regardless of their business, you will find a group of people who work with the "bare minimum I can do and still get a paycheck" philosophy. You will also find people who are dedicated to their work and work hard at it.

I recently started work in Contracts Administration for a contractor myself. Everyone I work with works hard, does good work, and doesn't waste time. I think, OP, that your office was an exception, rather than the rule.
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Old 07-06-2009, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Mountain View, CA
1,152 posts, read 2,845,197 times
Reputation: 1056
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScranBarre View Post
I happen to be employed as an auditor of defense contractors and work in a building in Tyson's Corner (or is it McLean? or is it Fairfax County? or is it the Seventh Layer of Hell?) adjacent to SAIC, and I can truly tell you that not all government contractors and/or Department of Defense employees are "lazy." On the contrary my audit team is very devoted to helping to save tax payers money through our "findings," some of which would shock and repulse some fiscally conservative types like myself.

I go into work normally for 6:30 AM and leave around 3 PM. We are afforded 30 minutes for lunch, but I normally just take 15 minutes and work through the other half of my lunch. I don't take breaks. Why? I feel blessed to be afforded this opportunity to serve my country (because Lord knows I couldn't serve in the military, but that's for a different political rant), and each day I walk into my building hoping to make a difference! It's a WISE investment on the behalf of the American tax payer if you pay me $40,000 annually to save the country $100,000 annually (net tax payer savings of $60,000).

I won't disclose WHICH contractor I happen to audit, as I am privvy to secure and classified information that I refuse to ever divulge, but from what I can tell every employee there whom I've had correspondence with has been very helpful, vigilant, and committed to their work. I've only been with my agency for roughly a month, but in that time I feel like I'm really trying to invest 110% effort! The learning curve is EXTREME for new hires with my particular specialty, but after a few years as my experience level and responsibilities rise I'll certainly be much more capable of helping to save YOU, the tax payer, money!
Good post. There's one thing I'd add to this discussion. A lot of Americans conflate working long hours with being dedicated and think that if you leave after 8 hours you are somehow "lazy." That couldn't be farther from the truth. There are plenty of people who "work" 10 hours a day and accomplish nothing, while others work 8 hours a day and accomplish an amazing amount.

That's part of the reason I left the pure legal profession. The focus is on time worked, not what you actually produce in that time. I've got news - I have a vibrant life outside of work, and frankly, working 50+ hours a week every week doesn't allow time for it. But I work hard, and highly efficient, and get more done at higher quality than most of the "smoke blowers" who sit in their office surfing the net for 10 hours a day so the boss thinks they are "dedicated."
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Old 07-06-2009, 05:14 PM
 
10,596 posts, read 12,092,834 times
Reputation: 6458
I was a defense contractor from 1988 until 2008. Depending on who my civil servant "client' was, I could be extremely busy or not. I was lucky to work for one client for over 10 years who valued me, taught me everything, and treated me as an equal on the program. Unfortunately, this arrangements NEVER last, and my next client was a very nice person, but could hardly delegate and I spent around 3 years surfing the web. It was very humiliating and an awful experience.

I took the first opportunity I could to leave defense contracting because I had learned so much over 20 years and I never wanted to be at someone's mercy again for my mental stimulation or my job security. I became a federal employee in March 2008 and have worked by a$$ off ever since---and I love every minute of it. It is SOOOOOOOO much better than being a contractor and being at some nutjobs mercy. Now I get to be the nutjob!

To the original poster of this thread--I believe you in what you say because I've seen it. It is not always the contractor's fault. It is the contractor's job to fill as many billets as he can get away with, whether the work is there or not. It is the government client's fault for continuing to fund billets/manhours when no work is being produced. If you get stuck in that position, it is very difficult. You keep hoping for work and it never comes. Then when it does, you don't know what the heck to do because you haven't done anything for months. It's awful.
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Old 07-06-2009, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
30,103 posts, read 67,204,935 times
Reputation: 15753
What does 9/11 have to do with this thread again?
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Old 07-06-2009, 07:25 PM
 
65 posts, read 340,378 times
Reputation: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by live_strong28 View Post
You can list a number of small incidents that are probably no worse than a drive by shooting in the hood with regard to the number of casualties.

Can you provide an example of a large scale casualty attack caused by Al Qaeda of which they favor?
Don't want to hijack this thread, so this is my last post regarding this...

So, terror attacks only count if they are in the form of a "bomb", cause mass casualties, and are done by al qaeda. Also, bombs are anything that ignite with any force regardless of the trigger.

Welp... You really tied me up with that one then... you got me.
Guess you win that discussion.

Get the banner boys! Mission accomplished!
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Old 07-06-2009, 09:39 PM
 
715 posts, read 1,866,444 times
Reputation: 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by DustyButt View Post
Don't want to hijack this thread, so this is my last post regarding this...

So, terror attacks only count if they are in the form of a "bomb", cause mass casualties, and are done by al qaeda. Also, bombs are anything that ignite with any force regardless of the trigger.

Welp... You really tied me up with that one then... you got me.
Guess you win that discussion.

Get the banner boys! Mission accomplished!
You're welcome.
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Old 07-06-2009, 09:44 PM
 
515 posts, read 1,506,115 times
Reputation: 234
Do I understand correctly that you are proposing to judge the entire defense industry based on your experience in one office?
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