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Old 09-06-2009, 05:20 AM
 
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Whatever they have done, it hasn't helped at all. There is still very few hispanics/african-americans attending TJ. They need to work on this in the elementary school level. By the time they get to middle school, a lot of these kids will not be able to take Algebra (which is a requirement for TJ). It starts at home and the parents emphasizing the importance of education to their kids.
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Old 09-06-2009, 05:45 AM
 
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Well, to begin with, not all high schools actually offer the full range of AP courses. And many, if not most, high school students who will be ready for college work at age 18 are not actually equipped for that work at age 15 or 16. Nor are their teachers, especially those whose degrees are in education, equipped to teach a TRUE college-level course. They can teach AP courses because of the rigid, teach-to-the-test formula, but they don't have the breadth of knowledge or experience that comes with a PhD and years of university-level teaching. The courses themselves are typically watered-down, memorization-heavy versions of the survey courses taught at universities. An excellent high school instructor and a room full of highly gifted classmates can make an AP course better than the university version, but in too many cases the AP course is a forced march through names, dates, and facts that inevitably speeds up toward the end of the year as the AP test looms. The push to make these courses open to all (or most) students means that they will be less challenging to that handful of advanced students for whom these courses were originally designed.

An increasing number of private and public schools are considering or actually dropping AP courses.
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/07/ed...l?ref=nyregion

And, of course, individual universities are making it more difficult for students to earn credits or bypass distribution requirements with AP tests, either by requiring higher scores on the AP tests or otherwise limiting these credits.

And although universities have different designations for particular departments, departments of biology or chemistry are often housed in the College of Science, not the liberal arts college.
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Old 09-06-2009, 06:37 AM
 
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My child has 44 AP credits so he can use 8 for math/science and 6 for humanities for his engineering major. He plans to do co-op which seems to be the "in" thing so it will take him 5 years to graduate spending 3 semesters in the co-op program.

For pre-med, the medical schools require certain math/science courses and it seems most do not accept AP credit for them. UVA gives credit for Chemistry but not the Lab credit which medical schools requires so a pre-med student would have to take Chemistry again with the lab (unless UVA allows them to take the lab only). It seems a lot of students are BioE majors with an intention to go onto med school but the BioE major gives them an option just in case they decide against med school.
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Old 09-06-2009, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Dudes in brown flip-flops
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UVA may give a lot of credits for AP classes, but not all universities do. I graduated from TJ in '99 and went to a college that only accepted up to two AP classes for generic "credit", although you could get placement into more advanced classes. I ended up double-majoring in two social sciences there, and under no circumstances could I have taken a normal course load each semester, avoided summer school, and graduated with even one degree in three years.

A lot of people may overload and do summer school in order to finish a semester or even a year early, but just because liberal arts classes typically give higher grades than the sciences doesn't mean we don't have to work, or that we can graduate early without putting in a lot of extra effort.

And yes, TJ does produce a lot of people who excel in non-science fields. Although I get the impression that recent TJ grads are a lot less diverse (ethnically and in terms of interests) than when I was there.
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Old 09-07-2009, 12:00 AM
 
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I don't know why you would think that TJ is producing a less diverse student body because they aren't. The administration works hard to keep TJ nearly half girls, and most of those are not that into science and tech and math. In addition, many of the boys aren't either. TJ administration has worked hard to encourage liberal arts types.
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Old 09-07-2009, 08:40 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Denton56 View Post
I don't know why you would think that TJ is producing a less diverse student body because they aren't. The administration works hard to keep TJ nearly half girls, and most of those are not that into science and tech and math. In addition, many of the boys aren't either. TJ administration has worked hard to encourage liberal arts types.
When people think "less diverse," they think fewer blacks, hispanics, and mixes.

Why would non science/tech types be interested in TJ anyway? Oh, forgot, just for the college apps.

In fact, as I've said before, TJ needs more diversity because otherwise they couldn't field sports teams like crew, football, soccer, track, field hockey, etc.

I wonder what % of those 55% asians actually participate in school sports.
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Old 09-07-2009, 10:27 AM
 
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Originally Posted by live_strong28 View Post
....I wonder what % of those 55% asians actually participate in school sports.

I don't know, but the ones that do are pretty good. I took an unbeaten (14-0, I think) Chantilly varsity basketball team over there one night and TJ whooped 'em. This one Asian kid was nailing 3-pointers all night!

I imagine football is a different story....but TJ has ALWAYS stunk at football, even when it was a regular high school.
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Old 09-07-2009, 10:48 AM
 
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Quote:
In fact, as I've said before, TJ needs more diversity because otherwise they couldn't field sports teams like crew, football, soccer, track, field hockey, etc.
Should TJ lower their standards even more so they can increase their diversity to have a winning football team? I think not!
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Old 09-07-2009, 02:07 PM
 
715 posts, read 1,866,291 times
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Originally Posted by Muffy62 View Post
Should TJ lower their standards even more so they can increase their diversity to have a winning football team? I think not!
No, but colleges do give preferential treatment to athletes...most even get full athletic scholarships (except for ivy league schools) to include free tutoring, advising, etc.

Having a winning sports team boosts interest in a school with more applicants, booster dollars, etc.

Even UVa freely admits this:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

A GAP IN SAT SCORES
Race actually is among several nonacademic factors considered by admissions officers here, who say they assess applicants individually, and use no formulas. Being a Virginian or an athlete, having a parent who is a graduate of the university, or coming from a rural area of the state can also bolster one's chances ranks of Virginia's Many black the fact that only come under scrutiny.



Race clearly does carry a lot of weight in admissions, however. Data from the university show that, in selecting freshmen for the fall of 1998, officials accepted 56.3 per cent of black applicants and 45.8 per cent of white applicants who were Virginians. Among those from out of state, the university admitted 56.1 per cent of the black applicants and 20.1 per cent of the white applicants. Among those who accepted offers of admission, black students had an average SAT score of 1149, compared 1339 for white students.



University of Virginia Office of African American Affairs: Documents: UVa's Affirmative-Action Debate
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Old 09-07-2009, 03:08 PM
 
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"No, but colleges do give preferential treatment to athletes...most even get full athletic scholarships (except for ivy league schools) to include free tutoring, advising, etc."

Once again, I'll ask where on earth you get your information?
Most college athletes receive partial scholarships. Full rides are typically limited to football and basketball stars at Division I schools or former Olympians. Everyone else gets a few thousand dollars plus some free workout gear.

"Excluding the glamour sports of football and basketball, the average N.C.A.A. athletic scholarship is nowhere near a full ride, amounting to $8,707. In sports like baseball or track and field, the number is routinely as low as $2,000. Even when football and basketball are included, the average is $10,409. Tuition and room and board for N.C.A.A. institutions often cost between $20,000 and $50,000 a year."

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/10/sp...olarships.html

Granted, it's a lot better than zero, but nowhere close to a free ride for the vast majority of athletes. Plus, they do have to work much harder than the average student.
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