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Old 01-02-2010, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
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I've seen a few references to exurb and suburbs lately--looks like there's a difference of opinion where the dividing line is. I know we touched on this once before as part of another thread, but it seemed like an interesting topic that deserved its own thread.

So.... what do you think? Where should the dividing lines be placed heading north, west, and south? Is Springfield a suburb or an exurb? How about Manassas? or Leesburg?
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Old 01-02-2010, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
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By the way, the thread that touched on this before was:

Highest income counties in U.S.

A particularly interesting quote in that thread was:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen 81 View Post
Brookings Institution did a study of exurbs in the United States in 2006. Fortunately (and unsurprisingly) for us, one of their maps was of census tracts in the DC/Baltimore metropolitan areas.

On page 18 of http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/Files/rc/reports/2006/10metropolitanpolicy_berube/20061017_exurbia.pdf you can see a map of how they defined exurban Washington based on population density, population growth, and commuting patterns. As you thought, Caladium, the dividing line was roughly Leesburg, although Great Falls and Clifton in Ffx County qualified as exurbs, too.

Page 20 even goes so far as to say that Loudoun County, taken as a whole, has passed beyond the exurban stage of development. I would say congrats, but I'm sure not everyone would agree
So we may have established the western boundaries (Loudoun as a whole). Or not--because you know what, I'm not sure I agree with Brookings Insititution. I still think Leesburg is the western boundary. What do you guys think?

And what about the dividing line heading south?
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Old 01-02-2010, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Fairfax County
1,534 posts, read 3,321,812 times
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See graphic on the second page of this (linked) PDF file from the Bureau of Labor and Statistics:

Industry dynamics in DC
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Old 01-02-2010, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
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I don't think Leesburg is the dividing line West. I'd consider the suburbs to end at the Fairfax County line both West and South. To me exurbs are areas that were developed after the 70s. Anything before that is a suburb.
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Old 01-02-2010, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OrangeFish View Post
See graphic on the second page of this (linked) PDF file from the Bureau of Labor and Statistics:

Industry dynamics in DC
Wow, what an interesting report. I'm going to have to spend a little time perusing that. But back to the question for a moment, the graphic defines it by county. What I wonder is, is the actual dividing line somewhere within the counties.
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Old 01-02-2010, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
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I consider Leesburg an exurb of Washington, DC and a suburb of Fairfax County, which in and of itself is a dominant force with well over a million residents and many of the region's major employment, shopping, and recretational centers. As Leesburg continues to grow in the coming years and eventually attracts more major employers of its own then I can guarantee Hamilton, Purcellville, Round Hill, and Lovettsville will all look like Ashburn, for better or for worse.
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Old 01-02-2010, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Fairfax County
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Quote:
Originally Posted by normie View Post
Wow, what an interesting report. I'm going to have to spend a little time perusing that. But back to the question for a moment, the graphic defines it by county. What I wonder is, is the actual dividing line somewhere within the counties.
Not according to the Census folks. But Census defines terms differently from other (federal) government agencies (like OMB).
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Old 01-02-2010, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Dudes in brown flip-flops
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Quote:
Originally Posted by normie View Post


So we may have established the western boundaries (Loudoun as a whole). Or not--because you know what, I'm not sure I agree with Brookings Insititution. I still think Leesburg is the western boundary. What do you guys think?

And what about the dividing line heading south?
To refer back to my post (hehe), I would agree with you, Normie, that Leesburg is the western boundary. Purcellville and Round Hill pretty much define exurbia - no jobs, homes spread out on multi-acre lots, etc.

I'd say that anything west of Manassas or south of Woodbridge is also exurban.
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Old 01-02-2010, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Dudes in brown flip-flops
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScranBarre View Post
As Leesburg continues to grow in the coming years and eventually attracts more major employers of its own then I can guarantee Hamilton, Purcellville, Round Hill, and Lovettsville will all look like Ashburn, for better or for worse.
Not unless Loudoun changes its zoning laws. In an effort to preserve the "rural" character of western Loudoun, the county passed these insane zoning ordinances that encourage sprawl and McMansions while still gobbling up farmland.

I keep waiting for Loudoun to realize its mistake, but I'm not holding my breath.
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Old 01-02-2010, 02:45 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 25,819,531 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
I don't think Leesburg is the dividing line West. I'd consider the suburbs to end at the Fairfax County line both West and South. To me exurbs are areas that were developed after the 70s. Anything before that is a suburb.
Technically the definition of exurb doesn't have anything to do with what era an area was built. A suburb has businesses, and an exurb is strictly a residential bedroom community.

It all comes to to commuting. One can live and work in the same suburb, but if you live in an exurb you have no choice but to commute to another area to work (unless you're a local police officer or something like that).
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