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Old 05-14-2010, 05:38 PM
 
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RR, have to agree with Guy Incognito and Denton on this one, and I say that with the best intentions for you. Why didn't you move to a rental in Winchester last weekend instead of where you did go ?
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Old 05-14-2010, 07:09 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Claire2900 View Post
I've lived here my whole life and worked for many years in law firms and have met my fair share of wealthy individuals with expensive cars, big houses, etc. Most wealthy people I know do NOT parade their wealth, they simply live their lives and yes than can afford expensive things. I can't help but think that its more about you than "them". I get wanting to have a home of your own and I didn't buy in this area until I was 36! You have moved to the Nations Capital, this IS a very transient area, it comes with the territory. If you truly hate it here, get a job in a small town in a mom n pop accounting office and be done w/ it!
Great post! The richest people I know are also the nicest, the most generous, and humble. They live their lives, care about their families and friends, and their neighbors. They are great assets to their communities.
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Old 05-14-2010, 07:17 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Yankeesfan View Post
RR, have to agree with Guy Incognito and Denton on this one, and I say that with the best intentions for you. Why didn't you move to a rental in Winchester last weekend instead of where you did go ?
That's an excellent point. I would suggest that anyone who is thinking of a move to Winchester should rent first before buying to see if they really do like it and to see if they can tolerate the commute.
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Old 05-14-2010, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC & New York
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The catch is time and money. Winchester is too far for most people to drive, that's why the prices are significantly lower. Geographically, it's in the northern part of the state, but it's the Valley, since NoVa (as in DC-centric and Dulles-centric) does not extend beyond Loudoun. Up to four hours (round trip) in the car, or car to train (MARC) or one of two buses that heads to Rosslyn/DC, is just not feasible for most people everyday, especially if they have a family. Winchester is over 50 miles from Dulles, and over 60 to Tysons. If you have to go Downtown, it's almost 70 miles to some parts of the city. Winter travel can be terrible from Winchester, too, so the time could easily extend beyond what would be reasonable. If one works in the Tri-State, Winchester market, then the problems narrow. But, for the majority of DC and Fairfax/Loudoun commuters, it's too far.

And, don't forget to add the extra costs of commuting in car repairs, fuel, and higher insurance for the number of miles driven if one were to drive to work in the DC suburbs or Downtown. Add in these extra expenses, including having to purchase a new/newer/commuter car for said trip, and the "savings" begin to evaporate.

You can find pretentious people wherever you go; and just because someone can afford a Lexus, Acura, BMW, or even Rolls Royce does not mean that they are materialistic or pretentious. Some are, but there are many more low-key people in this area who have a decent amount of money, but they live where they want to live, and have options. Some live in average 4BR colonials built in the 1960s-1980s in Vienna, Oakton, Fairfax, Fairfax Station, etc. that are neither showy, nor a McMansions. There are also pretentious people who drive Nissans, Fords, Subarus, and other non-luxury marques, too.
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Last edited by bmwguydc; 05-14-2010 at 08:45 PM.. Reason: Fixing a typo
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Old 05-14-2010, 08:31 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Alicia Bradley View Post
Hmm... I live with someone I adore, and I still hate it here. I honestly think DC suburbia (with a few notable exceptions) is actually not well... This might sound crazy, but I think as a community (or set of 'communities,' if you want to call the census-designated places that make up most of these such an elevated term) it's actually dysfunctional to the point of being ill, and I can really feel this seeping in to my soul whenever I have to go out and about in (most of) this area. It's like a place that is functioning because it literally has to, due to all the (mostly government-related) work in this area, and people obviously need places to live (and do other stuff - even if just barely). But it's not 'functioning' through any efforts of its (or its planners', or leaders', or infrastructural administrators') own. DC suburbia has three things going for it - location, location, and location. It doesn't have to be appealing in any other way, or function very well, or serve as any sort of development innovator - it is still going to be packed with people, with more wanting in all the time.
What is your definition of functioning? Does NY city function better? You can't drive or park there, constant noise of horns blasting, often very rude people, yet millions of people love living there. It seems the city functions well for them, just like many people in NOVA love where they live.

What makes NOVA dysfunctional? Trash gets picked up, UPS and the post office deliver everyday. Pubic schools are running, with the kids transported to their schools with most parents and students happy with their schools. People can shop, with a huge choice of stores, they can go to school, go to work, go out at night, take their kids to the park and library, buy a house, rent an apartment, ride their bikes, walk their dogs, park their cars, wash their cars, get high speed internet, buy a big screen and rent a movie to go with it, go to Starbucks, watch fireworks on the 4th of July, take the subway to some of the world's best museums which are free, have a choice of hundreds of restaurants and parks and bike paths and historical places. All of this while avoiding crime (for the most part). So what is not functioning about NOVA?
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Old 05-14-2010, 08:34 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Alanboy395 View Post
I disagree to a point. I was absolutely miserable in NoVA. Now that I'm in KY, while I'm a distance from happy, I'm not miserable even though I'm facing the challenges here.
As I recall, RestonRunner felt the same way when he first moved to Reston. In fact, he was very, very, excited and happy to be in NOVA.
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Old 05-14-2010, 09:43 PM
 
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Lower real estate prices and probably lower cost of living are appealing.
But it's a long haul even to Chantilly. Now keep in mind that you'd be driving east in the morning, west in the evening -- the sun in your eyes both ways at least part of the year. I work in Chantilly and have the opposite commute. Looks like a lot of traffic going west in the evening!
Not that there isn't traffic everywhere.
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Old 05-15-2010, 02:01 AM
 
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I want to live somewhere where I can sit on a front porch and invite a neighbor over to shoot the breeze. I want to live in an area where you get trick-or-treaters. I want to live in an area where you can go to the grocery store and bump into three people you know from work, church, college, etc. I want to live in an area where people seem to value other people equally as themselves. I want to live in an area where people don't think you need to work yourself to the core just to bank enough money to buy flashy things to impress others.
Seriously, I feel like I have all of these things in my neighborhood in West Springfield and MORE. Fairfax County is far from perfect, but I love my local library, rec center, nature center, and community pool, all of which are within walking/biking distance. Three days after we moved in my next door neighbor invited us to a neighborhood potluck in our honor. Since then we have had get-togethers with five or six families that live close by. We bake for each other, share plants from our gardens, give one another rides to the airport, and look after each other's kids. Granted, my neighborhood consists of mostly families, but I truly believe you can find the vibe you describe somewhere within Fairfax County.

Also, I used to live about 20 minutes from Winchester and went there for some of my medical care and shopping (although the shopping is not great). Yes, real estate is truly a bargain there compared to here, but I never got the great small town feeling you are describing. That at part of VA has always struck me as being somewhat intolerant and Moderator Cut(if that's even a word). And you certainly won't find the diversity and culture that exists here. For me that would be the "catch."

No area is perfect. For every positive thing about my neighborhood, I could list an equal number of drawbacks. (Christmas lights in May - really?!) Perhaps you should consider renting in Winchester and and giving the commute a try for a year before you commit to anything permanent. I hope you find what you're looking for.

Last edited by FindingZen; 05-15-2010 at 09:20 AM.. Reason: watch the stereotypes
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Old 05-15-2010, 05:05 AM
 
Location: Arlington, VA and Washington, DC
23,587 posts, read 33,333,953 times
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Originally Posted by Denton56 View Post
As I recall, RestonRunner felt the same way when he first moved to Reston. In fact, he was very, very, excited and happy to be in NOVA.
He may have been because of his job.

A couple of differences.

- I didn't move here solely for a job. (I'm looking for one now.)
- The housing here is very affordable, so if I hate the neighborhood I'm moving into I can pretty much move to nearly any part of Louisville proper. Sadly, RR doesn't really have that option.
- This is not planned as a long-term move. In fact, when I finish my degree (Hopefully Dec 2011), I'm probably going to move if there are better jobs to be had in my list of cities (Newport News, VA being at the top).
- I had much more time to research this place and prepare for the drawbacks.

I'm probably still in the honeymoon phase of this move but I do feel slightly better for leaving NoVA.

As for RestonRunner, I think he should just cut and run away from NoVA. He is in no better time period of his life than now to cut his losses and bite the bullet. I know he is absolutely miserable here and while moving will definitely not solve all of his problems (that I agree with you on) a change of scenery can help.
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Old 05-15-2010, 06:31 AM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
1,419 posts, read 3,013,799 times
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RR I think you need to actually do your potential commute one Monday morning, you can estimate all you want, but until you're actually on the road, you don't know what it will feel like. I live in Round Hill and my husband commutes to Herndon. It takes him 40 minutes during rush hour ON THE GREENWAY. I would estimate it takes a solid hour if not more to get to Tysons during rush hour. I am 30 minutes from Winchester with no traffic. SO if I do the math, that would be a 90 min one way commute, even with no extraordinary traffic issues and dealing with the expensive tolls on the Greenway. You're right that the traffic once you get to Hamilton on Route 7 going west is pretty non-existant, but even so, you're logging some serious miles.

Have you considered Purcellville? It's a great little small town, very friendly. No social life but close to Leesburg.

Honesly when we moved here, my husband had an offer to work in McLean, we figured our commute would be at least an hour from here. Go any further west and you're really going to suffer.
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