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Old 12-14-2013, 09:11 PM
 
Location: not sure, but there's a hell of a lot of water around here!
2,652 posts, read 6,630,159 times
Reputation: 3805

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I don't think you know what you're looking at Vipe. I've never seen a single wall house being built 'new' over here in the last 25-30 years.

Post some pics

And don't forget, according to the CD TOS, this site is DATA ONLY, AS IN FACTS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

One more thing, well, two more, as I have a tendency to exaggerate. #1, do you self-medicate before you go running? #2. Would this plethora of single wall constructed homes perhaps be more suitable for the 'wet' side of the Bigger Island, namely Kona, seeing as single wall buildings 'breathe' better, what with having none of that nasty insulation or vapor barrier.

Inquiring minds need to,,,, uuuurrrrrppppp, scuze me, know these things

Last edited by Jungjohann; 12-14-2013 at 10:06 PM.. Reason: Au make'make he iki hou kolohe 'olelo
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Old 12-14-2013, 09:45 PM
 
Location: Currently stuck on the mainland
181 posts, read 220,255 times
Reputation: 349
Quote:
Originally Posted by OpenD View Post
Don't get freaked out if you go to Home Depot or a local lumber yard and they don't carry some of the items you consider "everyday" on the mainland.
Like, say, LUMBER . . ."We'll get that in for you sometime next week . . ."
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Old 12-14-2013, 11:55 PM
 
52 posts, read 132,995 times
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This is great. I'm glad that I posted this, I now have an appreciation for the architectural significance of the house and I'm going to treat it that way. My daughter wants me to build a Sheetrock wall to frame around their tv. I'm going to try and find similar cedar panelling to build a new single wall around the TV. I understand that this was just a cheap house when it was built but I think that while we can make it more modern and make improvements, I think we should treat it with respect as a part of Hawaiian history that is completely different than the rest of the country.

By the way, while I'm here I'm staying in a huge, hillside, multi-level, timber frame and single wall house over looking the yacht club in Kaneohe. I wouldn't have realized what it was if it wasn't for my daughter's little house in Wahiawa.
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Old 12-15-2013, 12:09 AM
 
Location: Volcano
12,971 posts, read 24,167,715 times
Reputation: 10614
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoloPilot View Post
Like, say, LUMBER . . ."We'll get that in for you sometime next week . . ."
Please, I just HATE exaggeration!

They NEVER get stock replacement in that quickly.
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Old 12-15-2013, 12:55 AM
 
Location: Volcano
12,971 posts, read 24,167,715 times
Reputation: 10614
Quote:
Originally Posted by Retired Early View Post
This is great. I'm glad that I posted this, I now have an appreciation for the architectural significance of the house and I'm going to treat it that way.
If you liked that, you might enjoy this... there are three architectural details that are considered a unique part of Hawaiian culture. You can find them all over Hawai'i, but almost nowhere else. They are the Dickey Roof aka Hawaiian Style roof, a double pitch style with a with a low angle and large overhang at the bottom and a steep pitch on top; Single Wall construction, where the roof is held up by outer walls made of 3/4" thick vertical tongue-and-groove boards; and the Palm Tree Column, which flares widely at the top.

There are some photos of each here:

Hawaiian Architecture

Last edited by OpenD; 12-15-2013 at 01:09 AM..
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Old 12-15-2013, 01:23 AM
 
941 posts, read 1,683,982 times
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I think davephan got whtviper1 confused. He was writing about double walls having 4 layers of sheetrock and 3 dead air spaces, 2 of which had studs. In his terminology, a single wall has 2 layers of sheetrock that enclose one dead air space with studs. In Hawaii, single wall construction means only one layer of wood (usually 3/4 inch thick tongue and groove vertical boards, as the OP mentioned). They're attached to the floor and have a runner at the top, above the ceiling, in the attic. They also usually have several metal bands (or angle iron for rigidity) around the outside to hold the shape. Beyond that, it is just the box shape of the rooms and inner walls that give the house its structure. Electricity runs underneath, in the attic, in baseboards (outlets), and in door frames (switches). Water and waste water often hang outside, which is the ugliest thing about them. But plenty of single wall houses on Kauai survived hurricanes Dot, Iwa, and Iniki, including mine. My house does have an inner double wall (of wood and without studs) between a closet and the bathroom for most of the plumbing. Also, my house an addition from the 1980's that has double wall, but both are wood, including vertical t&g on the inside, so it looks like the rest of the house.

I like the simplicity of the design, having wood everywhere, the vertical pinstripe pattern, and not having Sheetrock/gypsum (remember the bad quality stuff from china that had outgassing issues). They look simple and unpretentious--unlike the newest designs. Many of the old ones have interior accents such as Japanese-looking dividers or built-in shelves. The downside is that you have to tent them againt termites every 6-8 years. I wish there were a modern way to make them (improved electric and plumbing) and building codes that allowed them.
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Old 12-15-2013, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Woodbury, MN
1,472 posts, read 1,593,503 times
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The double wall construction that was taking about is for the exterior walls. There is only one layer of Sheetrock on the interior. Between the two 2x4 walls is a single air space, filled with insulation. Either the inside or outside 2x4 wall can be the support wall. The outside of the double wall has fiberboard or ridgid insulation. Outside of that is the wind blocking material. Outside of that is your siding material.

This double wall construction is very rare and is only found in super-insulated houses. Normally, 2x6 studs are used in exterior walls, except old construction, which were built with 2x4 exterior walls.

The interior walls can be 2x4 with Sheetrock on both sides. Sometimes sound insulation is put in the airspace in between the 2x4 studs. Rarely, but sometimes people up a second layer of sheetlock on both sides of the wall for more sound insulation. One of the reasons Sheetrock is used is for safety reasons, besides esthetics. It takes time for a fire to burn through a Sheetrock wall. The extra time can save people's lives.
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Old 12-15-2013, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Volcano
12,971 posts, read 24,167,715 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davephan View Post
The double wall construction that was taking about is for the exterior walls. There is only one layer of Sheetrock on the interior. Between the two 2x4 walls is a single air space, filled with insulation.
Yeah, if you are talking about 2 X 4 studs and a vapor barrier and sheetrock interiors, at least in Hawai'i that's "double-wall."

Traditional Hawaiian single-wall has no studs, no interior wall sheathing, no vapor barrier. The interior walls are the inside surface of the 3/4" thick exterior wall lumber. Inside, it's like having wood paneling everywhere.

A friend of mine is restoring a lovely old pre-war home that was built single wall, by a family that ran a large plum orchard mauka the village. The orchard was wiped out after Kilauea started erupting continuously 30 years ago, when the emissions interfered with the pollination cycle that sets the fruit. So the property was uninhabited for some time before he bought it, and termites and water damage got to part of the house. He hasn't been able to obtain the 3/4" T&G lumber in the particular millwork pattern originally used, which had different patterns for the exterior and the interior. He's so interested in doing a faithful restoration that he bought a milling machine and custom cutters to do the work himself. And a shipping container to set up shop in. It's a labor of love.

As JJ said, this style of construction probably stopped being used in the 70s, but at least on the Big Island another minimalist style has endured, especially where building permits are dismissed as an unnecessary formality... T&G plywood siding over stud framing, sans interior wall, much as mainland garages or sheds are often built. This style is also referred to as single-wall, further confusing the casual bystander. Again, in a tropical climate, where you depend on the balmy climate and breezes through big open windows to stay comfortable, it's a viable way to build inexpensively. And unless you are prepared to run an AC a lot, it's actually far less prone to developing mold and mildew than sheetrock is.

But alas, when you outlaw single wall construction, only the outlaws get single wall construction.
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Old 12-15-2013, 11:07 AM
 
52 posts, read 132,995 times
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2x4 framing is actually called "platform framing". It was developed by Levitt Builders to standardize the building of their Levittown developments. The first one was on Long Island, NY and it was America's first suburb. Before that it was "balloon framing" and you put studs anywhere you needed them. It didn't matter because the houses had boards for exterior sheathing and lath and plaster inside. With plywood and Sheetrock 16 inch centers for studs were standardized and that's the way we build today. We owe it all to the Levitt Bros.

I built my house in Upstate NY. It's in snow country and it used to seem like winter started in September and didn't end til June. It has 2x6 exterior walls with 6 inches of fiberglass insulation, 8 inch insulation in the floor above the crawl space and 20 inches in the flat ceiling and 12 in the sloping ceilings. Sheetrock inside and cedar clabboard siding outside. With electric heat, a pellet stove and a high efficiency air tight fireplace, I pay less than $50 a month for power. Our rate is a fraction of yours though. I love that house and it's probably the biggest thing keeping me from moving over here. Right now, having my tea on the deck overlooking Kaneohe Bay, it's pretty tempting though.

Here's my house;
Attached Thumbnails
Single wall construction;  I don't get it!-image.jpg  
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Old 12-15-2013, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Kailua
9,479 posts, read 12,731,192 times
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I don't know what defines a "wall" - but the "walls" all around my neighborhood including my newly built house don't seem more than 6 inches wide and it appears at least to the naked eye to be one "wall". Although if that means there are 2 or more "walls" within that "wall" I don't know.
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