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Old 02-17-2013, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Chicago(Northside)
3,719 posts, read 6,441,171 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dxdtdemon View Post
Bangladesh has 1.5 times the land area of Ohio (in their dry season) and around 13 times the population. Given that they have much less land area during monsoon season, and it's during then that they are the world model for overcrowding, I think we can safely conclude that Ohio is not overpopulated.
Glad your thinking out of the box but you cant compare an developed area to a underdeveloped area.
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Old 02-17-2013, 04:53 PM
 
882 posts, read 1,503,316 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zerhacke View Post
Excellent statistic, but it's a bit unfair to compare an entire state to the smallest Borough of a single city.
If Ohio had the population density of Cuyahoga County, there would be 125,510,000 people in the state, more than California, Texas, New York, Florida and Illinois (five most populous states) combined.

If the state had Cleveland's population density, there would be 228,921,275 people, over 2/3 the total population of the United States.

Ohio is definitely not overpopulated. Sure, the state isn't losing people from census to census like Michigan did from 2000 to 2010, but it's growing at a much slower rate than most other states. From 2000 to 2010, Ohio gained 183,364 people, only a 1.6% increase in population. Only Louisiana (1.4%), Rhode Island (0.4%) and the aforementioned Michigan (-0.6%) had smaller percent changes in population than Ohio did from 2000 to 2010.

We lost two congressional districts as a result of the stunted growth.
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Old 02-17-2013, 06:20 PM
 
10 posts, read 31,949 times
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What is the benefit of having the population density of Manhattan? It is nice to live in a state where you don't have a 3 hour commute to work and housing is cheap.
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Old 02-17-2013, 06:25 PM
 
74 posts, read 151,880 times
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I can see where you're going with this, but overpopulation and population growth are not necessarily linked.

Even if Ohio had a population growth of 10% it would still only have a population density of about 270 people per square mile.

Overpopulation is measured by population density and not population growth. A classic illustration of this is Texas. Even if Texas tripled in population (a population growth of 300% in 1 year) there'd be a population density of about 95 people per square mile, meaning that even with never before performed population growth they'd still be considerably underpopulated compared to Ohio.

Also, I have to repeat that it's an apples to oranges comparison to compare an entire state's population density to a cherry picked and entirely different geographical region. It makes little sense to compare all of Ohio to just Cuyahoga County, or Manhattan, or anywhere else.

After all, the opposite and just as ridiculous idea is to compare Ohio's population density to Guernsey County's population density which is makes Ohio look like it only has 3 million and some some change people.

When comparisons are made, it's best to stick to similar geographic designations. States need compared to states.
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Old 02-17-2013, 06:27 PM
 
1,295 posts, read 1,665,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zerhacke View Post
Excellent statistic, but it's a bit unfair to compare an entire state to the smallest Borough of a single city.
I just thought it was interesting, and it was framed in a way that is comprehensible for people who have been to Manhattan. No doubt it's not realistic (not in this century, anyway), but there's nothing "unfair" about it -- it was just sort of a thought experiment: what might a "full" Ohio be like?

Here's something more "apples to apples": New Jersey is the most densely populated state. If Ohio (currently the 10th most densely populated state) had the same population density as NJ, the state would be home to 53,296,925 people. That's roughly 15 million more people than the most populous state, California. (California ranks 11th in density, just behind Ohio.)
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Old 02-17-2013, 10:16 PM
 
74 posts, read 151,880 times
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That strikes an interesting side question. If Ohio had the population density of New Jersey, would we suddenly develop a beach full of needles? Would we develop a complex about being right next door to a gigantic city but have none of our own? Finally, would Kevin Smith decide to smudge our name by filming cruddy movies about shopping in our state?

Is New Jersey's problem that of overpopulation or does New Jersey just have all the bad luck?
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Old 02-19-2013, 02:56 PM
 
2,106 posts, read 6,100,978 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott SW Ohio View Post
I think "overpopulated" is a function of how people live. We may indeed be pushing the limits of the suburban/exurban commuter model pretty soon. On the other hand, if there were jobs for them and with the right new infrastructure I think the City of Cincinnati could accommodate a lot more residents, and I'd guess the same is true of the other major cities in Ohio who have lost population density over the last few decades.
Cleveland has the infrastructure for far more people than Cincinnati. Within city limits, cleveland almost reached 1 million people. I know Cincywas never close to that. Columbus certainly has the sheer size to add a sizable population due to its consolidation of neighboring communities.
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Old 02-19-2013, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Chicago(Northside)
3,719 posts, read 6,441,171 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WeSoHood View Post
Cleveland has the infrastructure for far more people than Cincinnati. Within city limits, cleveland almost reached 1 million people. I know Cincywas never close to that. Columbus certainly has the sheer size to add a sizable population due to its consolidation of neighboring communities.
You got to remember Cleveland is flat while Cincinnati has many steep hills especially in its city limits.
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Old 02-20-2013, 02:31 AM
 
74 posts, read 151,880 times
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Seattle and Atlanta are nothing but hills and they're two of the biggest cities in the US.

What's your point?
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Old 02-20-2013, 07:44 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
35,299 posts, read 64,612,835 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cali3448893 View Post
You got to remember Cleveland is flat while Cincinnati has many steep hills especially in its city limits.
Oh, good grief.
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